Chapter 17 - Company C, Sixty-Second Regiment PV

Created: Monday, 11 April 2011 Last Updated: Tuesday, 25 February 2014 Written by Nathan Zipfel Print Email

CHAPTER XVII

COMPANY C, SIXTY-SECOND REGIMENT, P.V.

When Recruited - Organization and Muster - Service in the Field - Death of Colonel Black - Roll of Company

On the 4th of July, 1861, Thomas B. Monks recruited a company at Curllsville and Sligo, Clarion county, which was officered as follows: Captain, Thomas B. Monks; first lieutenant, Benjamin Huey; second lieutenant, Wm. G. Lowry; first sergeant, John E. Myers, and other company officers as shown in the accompanying roll.

Authority to recruit a regiment was given Colonel Samuel W. Black by the secretary of war, on the 4th of July, and when Colonel Black was ready to receive recruits Captain Monks’s company was ready to enter the regiment. It was taken in wagons to Kittanning, from that place it went on the cars to Pittsburgh. It was mustered into the United States service in Lafayette Hall, Pittsburgh, on the 25th of July, 1861, and soon after proceeded to Camp Cameron, near Harrisburg. At Pittsburgh the company was designated Company C, of Colonel Black’s regiment, which was at this time designated the Thirty-third Independent Regiment, and was Organized as follows: Samuel W. Black, of Pittsburgh, colonel; F.T. Lehman, of Pittsburgh, lieutenant-colonel, and J.B. Switzer, of Pittsburgh, major. Colonel Black had served in the Mexican war as lieutenant-colonel, and Lieutenant-Colonel Lehman was afterward made colonel of the One Hundred and Third.

The war department issued orders to recruit troops, but the governor of the States claimed the right to commission all the officers of the troops raised in their respective Commonwealths. This controversy between the national and State authorities was not settled till late in the fall of 1861. On the 19th of November the war department issued an order placing all independent regiments on the same footing as other State troops. The governor then immediately commissioned the officers of the "Thirty-third," and on its being adopted as a State organization, it was designated the Sixty-second Pennsylvania. The commissions bore date July 4, 1861. After spending a few weeks at Camp Cameron the regiment proceeded to Baltimore, and thence to Washington. It took up quarters at Camp Rapp, on Kendall Green, in the northern suburbs of the city. Here the regiment was armed and equipped for service. Six companies were furnished with the improved Springfield rifles. The other six had smooth-bore muskets. Company C had muskets at first, but were afterward supplied with rifles. The regiment crossed the Potomac on the 11th of September, and was assigned to the Second Brigade of Porter’s Division. It was camped near Fort Corcoran. The officers immediately began to drill the troops, but little progress was made in this line, as the men were almost constantly on duty, making roads and entrenchments, and in cutting away the pine forests in the vicinity of Arlington Heights. The Confederates had occupied Munson’s Hill, but they fell back and the lines of our army were advanced and re-formed. In the new line the camp of the Sixty-second was located near Falls Church on the Alexandria, Loudon and Hampshire Railroad. It lay here a few weeks, when it moved to Minor’s Hill and went into winter quarters, in Camp Bettie Black, named in honor of the colonel’s youngest daughter. At Camp Bettie Black drill and discipline were rigidly enforced. The routine observed was squad drill from six to nine A.M., company drill from ten A.M. to twelve M., and battalion drill from one to five P.M., daily. The entire division was also drilled, and occasionally a sham battle was had. Other exercises were observed, and the soldiers felt relieved when spring came with its duties in the field. Before leaving Pittsburgh the regiment received a present of a flag from the ladies of that city. It received the State colors at Hall’s Hill in December. On the 6th of November First Lieutenant Benjamin Huey, of Company C, resigned, and on the 12th of that month Second Lieutenant Wm. G. Lowry succeeded him. The company lost a number of other men during the fall of 1861 and the winter of 1861—62. On the 3d of August John Hubert and Wm. Flick deserted. On the 20th of August Abraham Mock and Alexander Craig were discharged. Wm. Ong deserted from the company on September 1 and joined Company K, of the One Hundred and Fifty-fifth P.V. George W. Springer deserted on the 28th of September. John Karns died at Washington, D.C., October 15. John Barlett died at Georgetown, D.C., November 6, and Andrew Barlett died near Hall’s Hill on the i6th of the same month. Simeon Callen was discharged on surgeon’s certificate December 16. Jackson McCannaha died at Washington, D.C., October 15, and Tate Henry was discharged March 10, 1862. Corporal Robert A. Lowry accidentally shot himself with his brother Wm. G. Lowry’s revolver, February 1, 1862. The greater part of this loss was sustained as a result of a malignant form of camp fever which prevailed in the camp in the early part of the winter. From the date of its entering the service to March 10, when the army moved upon the enemy, Company C had lost fourteen men. When armed and equipped the company numbered 101 men. It received two recruits August 20, 1861; five January 28, 1862, and one on the 7th of February, 1862, making a total enrollment of 109 men. March 10, 1862, it numbered ninety-five men, some of them sick.

When the army moved upon the works of the enemy at Manassas, March 10, it found them abandoned. The Sixty-second was halted at Fairfax Court House. The army was to be transferred to the Peninsula, so the regiment left Fairfax on the 15th of March and proceeded to Alexandria. It embarked upon transports and proceeded to Fortress Monroe, where it went into camp near the little village of Hampton, which Magruder had destroyed. It was soon put on duty in a reconnaissance toward Yorktown. The troops returned to camp after having gone as far as Big Bethel. When the army moved upon Yorktown on the 3d of April, the Sixty-second marched up near the enemy’s works, and the men of Company C got their first sight of Confederate troops uniformed in gray.

Skirmishing ensued, and the Sixty-second marched forward and took its place in line of battle under fire. The enemy was soon obliged to evacuate. Bates says: "Colonel Black was first apprised of the evacuation by three deserters, who came in with a flag of truce; the regiment happening to be on picket near the river on the night in which it was made." The regiment had one man killed and three wounded. Company C suffered no loss. It remained near Yorktown, as did all of Porter’s division, till May 8th, when it moved on transports up the York River to a place opposite West Point, where the division landed and went into camp. Here Porter was placed in command of the Fifth Provisional Corps, which was then formed. Morrell assumed command of Porter’s division and Brigadier-General Charles Griffin became commander of the Second Brigade. When the army advanced up the Chickahominy, Porter’s Corps moved up on the left bank. On the 27th of May Porter’s Corps encountered the enemy at Hanover Court House, defeating him and capturing a number of prisoners and arms. Colonel Black earnestly commended the Sixty-second for its conduct in this engagement. The loss was small. At Mechanicsville the regiment moved to support the Pennsylvania Reserves, and was under fire for an hour, but was not actively engaged and sustained no loss. On the morning of the 27th of June, Porter withdrew his troops from Beaver Dam Creek, where the Reserves were engaged, and posted them on an elevation south of Gaines’s Mill. Here he awaited the advance of the enemy. The enemy came on and opened the battle about 2 P.M., on the 27th. The Sixty-second Pennsylvania, with the Ninth Massachusetts, was ordered forward to charge across a ravine in front. They advanced under a terrific infantry fire, and driving back the enemy with frightful slaughter, they gained the woods on the opposite side of the ravine. Before the regiment reached the woods Colonel Black was instantly killed. Under the lead of Lieutenant-Colonel Switzer the men pressed on, drove the enemy back, and gained a position considerably in advance of the main line of battle. In this position they were soon discovered, and the enemy pressing hard upon their flank, poured into their ranks a withering enfilading fire, which forced them to withdraw. The Sixty-second reformed in an open field to the right of the woods. The battle was raging furiously. Their ammunition was exhausted. The men had scarcely got into position when General Seymour rode up, and ascertaining that they had no ammunition he directed that their cartridge-boxes be filled at once. He then ordered Colonel Switzer to proceed immediately to the extreme left of the line to help check the furious onset of the enemy at that point. Colonel Switzer led his gallant men on a double quick, over swampy ground towards the Chickahominy, to the point indicated. The ranks of the regiment were sadly thinned, but it was immediately formed and bravely charged up the hill and into the woods, upon entering which, it received a most frightful volley of musketry. It returned the fire, and the battle at this time was most terrible all along the entire line. The right gave way. The Sixty-second was again flanked, and unable to sustain the shock of such vastly superior numbers, it was carried back with the entire army toward the Chickahominy. Desperately fighting to hold his ground, Colonel Switzer was captured and taken away to Libby Prison. In this terrible conflict Company C had James H. Craig, Thomas B. McEwen, Henry Stewart, and John H. Boyles killed. William H. Myers was wounded, and Stephen McTigue was captured.

The Sixty-second reached Malvern Hill June 30. It had no field officers. It was commanded by Captain James C. Hull, of Company A, and supported Battery D, of the Fifth United States Artillery. The Confederates gave special attention to the battery. It sustained a fearful cannonading, which was poured upon it in return for its rapid and effective work. When the enemy’s artillery failed to silence the battery, his infantry charged it with frantic bravery, and in the fiery ordeal the Sixty-second suffered severely. Company C’s list of killed at Malvern numbered three, viz.: Corporal Andrew Jenkins, Decatur S. Wyman, and William A. Winkett. William B. Wyman, James C. Meanor, William H. Hileman, Andrew Loux, George Rockafellow, Christian Chromer, John, Freeman, George Kribbs, Daniel D. Smith, and John Stover were wounded.

The regiment took part in the engagement at Harrison’s Bar on the 31st of July, without much loss. At Gainesville, on the 27th of August, the regiment engaged the enemy, had two men wounded, one of whom was George W. Boyer, of Company C, who was also captured. The regiment was held in reserve during the remaining two days of the disastrous second Bull Run. On the 4th of September the Sixty-second went into camp at its old camp near Minor’s Hill, Camp Bettie Black. Few in number and worn down, it presented a strong contrast to the full ranks of strong men who encamped here before starting to the field. At Antietam, on the 17th, Company C suffered no loss. On the 20th of September the regiment crossed the Potomac at Blackford’s Ford, captured a few stragglers and returned to the army without loss. It joined the corps, moved to follow up the retreating army. The corps had scarcely started when the enemy attacked the head of the column and the engagement became general. The Union troops were routed. Company C came out without any loss. On the 29th of September the company was in - the engagement at Kearneysville, Va., but had no loss.

On the 10th of September, 1862, Lieutenant W. G. Lowry, of Company C, was promoted to major of the regiment. When Burnside reorganized the army, Colonel Switzer became commander of the Second Brigade, and Lieutenant Colonel Hull took charge of the Sixty-second.

At Fredericksburg the company, in common with the brigade, were in the front and thickest of the fight from Saturday noon, December 13, to Sunday night, when the troops were relieved. Monday they again went to the front. The regiment was reported to have had two officers and five men killed; seven officers and fifty-six men wounded. Samuel H. Moore and William Timms, of Company C, were killed; and Charles Glaze and Joshua Knox were wounded.

The company next took part in the battle of Chancellorsville, escaping without loss, but participating in some of the most desperate fighting during the progress of the battle. At Middleburg the company was also engaged. The Sixty-second reached the bloody field of Gettysburg before daylight, July 2, 1863. It fought hard all day, and maintained its reputation for bravery and devotion. During the 3d it occupied a position along the stone wall. Major Lowry, Samuel Dearmott, and William H. Myers, of Company C., were killed; Charles Glaze, Milton C. Goheen, James C. Meanor, Thomas H. Bowser, William Geer, John Konkle, William B. Larimer, and James Pence were wounded, and Thomas H. Bowser, John Konkle, David Fink, and Thomas Kiskaddon were taken prisoners.

On the 12th of July the regiment encountered the enemy at Funkstown, Maryland. The company had no casualties. Returning to Virginia, the troops were engaged at Rappahannock Station, Grove Church, and Mine Run. Thus closed the year, and they went into winter quarters at Licking Run. In 1864, during the Wilderness campaign, the regiment lost heavily. On the 12th of May, at Spottsylvania, Adjutant John E. Myers and Lieutenant William H. Johnston, of Company C, were killed. On the 8th of May George Coursin was wounded, and Leroy Abbott on the 12th.

Colonel Hull being mortally wounded, Captain McClay, of Compay C, assumed command. On the night of the 13th the regiment took position in front of Spottsylvania. It was almost constantly under fire here till the 21st of May. It engaged the enemy at North Anna about noon of that day. On the 2d of June it engaged the enemy at a place near Tolopotomy Creek. On the 3d it performed signal service duty, and lost heavily. In this series of engagements Company C sustained no loss. On the 8th of June it was hotly engaged before Petersburg. Company C had Milton C. Goheen killed. The company was again in battle on the 21st of June at Jerusalem Plank Road, without loss. It served on picket and fatigue duty until the 2d of July, when, its term of service having expired, it was ordered to the rear. On the 4th of July it started from City Point for Pittsburgh, and having reached that city, it was mustered out of service July 13, 1864. Not to particularize further, be it said that Company C was a worthy representative of the patriotic organizations of Clarion county. Its officers were men who led. They were found with their men, and the death of Lowry, Myers, and Johnston emphasizes this declaration.

The writer is indebted to Sergeant David R. Lobaugh for valuable assistance in correcting the attached roll; also in procuring some dates of decided importance. It is not too much to say that Company C, of the Sixty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, has every reason to be proud of its record. The few who failed to do their whole duty are entirely lost sight of in contemplation of the great majority who won enviable distinction by their devotion and valor. I.M. Shannon, of this company, was elected sheriff of Clarion county in 1882.

CORRECTED ROLL OF COMPANY C, SIXTY-SECOND REGIMENT.

Thomas B. Monks, captain, July 25, 1861, three years; resigned October 17, 1862.

William P. McClay, captain, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted from first sergeant to second lieutenant November 12, 1861; to captain October 17, 1862; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Benjamin Huey, first lieutenant, July 25, 1861, three years; resigned November 6, 1861, re-enlisted August 8, 1862; transferred.

William G. Lowry, first lieutenant, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted from second to first lieutenant November 12, 1861; to major September 10, 1852; killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863.

John E. Myers, first lieutenant, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted from first sergeant to first lieutenant September 10, 1862; to adjutant June 20, 1863; killed at Spottsylvania March 12, 1864.

Wm. H. Johnston, first lieutenant, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted from sergeant to second lieutenant October 17, 1862; to first lieutenant July .20, 1863; died May 17, 1864, of wounds received in action May 12, 1864.

Charles Glaze, sergeant, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted from corporal October 17, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, and also at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863; transferred to Invalid Corps.

Jacob M. Conrad, sergeant, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted from corporal October 17, 1862; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Reuben Dunkle, sergeant, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted from corporal November 12, 1861; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

David R. Lobaugh, sergeant, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted from corporal March 10, 1862; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Milton C. Goheen, sergeant, July 25, 1861, three years; wounded at Gettysburg, Pa.; killed at Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864.

Tate Henry, sergeant, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged March 10, 1862.

William B. Wyman, corporal, July 25, 1861, three years; wounded at Malvern Hill; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

James C. Meanor, corporal, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted to corporal May 20, 1862; wounded at Malvern Hill and Gettysburg; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Thomas Stover, corporal July 25, 1862 promoted to corporal July 5, 1862; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Wm. H. Hileman, corporal, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted to corporal July 3, 1863; wounded at Malvern Hill; mustered out with company July 3, 1864.

Wm. J. Sample, corporal, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted to corporal July 3, 1863; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Charles Bicehouse, corporal, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted to corporal July 3, 1863; absent, sick, at muster out.

Joshua Knox, corporal, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted to corporal July 3, 1863; wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862; mustered out with company July I 3, 1864.

Thos. H. Bowser, corporal, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted to corporal October 4, 1863; wounded and taken prisoner at Gettysburg; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Andrew Loux, corporal, July 25, 1861, three years; wounded at Malvern Hill; discharged January 23, 1863.

Henry Z. Wilhelm, corporal, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate June 5, 1862.

Andrew Jenkins, corporal, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted to corporal March 15, 1862; killed at Malvern Hill July 1, 1862.

George Rockafellow, corporal, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted to corporal March 15, 1862; wounded at Malvern Hill; transferred to Invalid Corps October 15, 1863.

Robert A. Lowry, corporal, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted to corporal November 12, 1861; killed by accidental shot February 1, 1862.

Lewis Coursin, musician, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged for disability February 9, 1863.

James Low, musician, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Abbott, Leroy, private, August 20, 1861, three years; wounded at Spottsylvania May 12, 1864; in hospital when discharged.

Bartlebough, Jos., private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Boyles, John H., private, July 25, 1861, three years; killed at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862.

Barnes, Joseph, private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged October 23, 1862.

Boyer, George, private, January 28, 1861, three years; wounded and prisoner at Gainesville August 27, 1862; transferred to Invalid Corps September 1, 1863.

Barlett, Andrew R., private, July 25, 1861, three years; died near Hall’s Hill November 16, 1861.

Barlett, John, private, July 25, 1861, three years; died at Georgetown, D.C., November 6, 1861.

Clugh, Thomas, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Caldwell, James A., private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Craig, William, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Coleman, Henry, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Carson, Samuel, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Chromer, Christian, private, July 25, 1861, three years; wounded at Malvern Hill; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Coursin, George, private, July 15, 1861, three years; wounded in action May 8, 1864; discharged, date unknown.

Craig, James H., private, July 25, 1861, three years; killed at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862.

Carson, James, private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged January 14, 1863.

Craig, Alexander, private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged August 20, 1861.

Callen, Simeon, private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate December 16, 1861.

Dunkle, Anderson, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Dearmott, Samuel, private, July 25, 1861, three years; killed at Gettysburg July 2, 1863; buried in National Cemetery, section E, grave 22.

Elder, Marion, private, August 16, 1862, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Elder, William, private, August 16, 1862, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Fox, Obed E., private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Fisher, James M., private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Freeman, John, private, July 25, 1861, three years; wounded at Malvern Hill; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Fink, David, private, July 25, 1861, three years; prisoner at Gettysburg; died at Pittsburgh October 11, 1864.

Frank, Martin, private, July 25, 1861, three years; re-enlisted, veteran, December 27, 1863.

Flick, William, private, July 25, 1861, three years; deserted August 3, 1861.

Geer, William, private, August 16, 1862, three years; wounded at Gettysburg; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Hagan, David, private, August 16, 1862, three years; died in Philadelphia June 19, 1863.

Hagan, Bartlett C., private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Hanger, Andrew, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Henry, Robert J., private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged July 24, 1862.

Hilbert, John, private, July 25, 1861, three years; deserted August 3, 1861.

James, John, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Konkle, John, private, July 25, 1861, three years; wounded at Gettysburg; discharged April 12, 1864.

Kisskaddon, Thomas, private, July 25, 1861, three years; prisoner at Gettysburg; re-enlisted, veteran, January 30, 1864.

Kribbs, George, private, July 25, 1861, three years; wounded at Malvern Hill; discharged.

Karns, John, private, July 25, 1861, three years; died at Washington, D.C., October 5, 1861.

Keller, John M., private, August 18, 1862, three years.

Larimer, William B., private, July 25, 1861, three years; wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863; discharged.

Lewis, John, private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged February, 1863.

Lewis, James, private, July 25, 1861, three years; transferred to Invalid Corps December 1, 1863.

Levan, Elias, private, January 28, 1862, three years; recruited January 28, 1862; discharged October 20, 1862.

Levan, Lorenzo S., private, January 28, 1862, three years; recruited January 28, 1862; transferred

to Invalid Corps September 1, 1863.

Maitland, Jeremiah, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Manly, George B., private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Muhnkarn, John, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Myers, William H., private, July 25, 1861, three years; promoted to corporal; wounded at Gaines’s Mill, Va.; killed at Gettysburg, Pa.

Myers, Samuel, private, July 25, 1861, three years; died at Philadelphia, Pa., January 12, 1863.

Moore, Jacob K., private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged December 20, 1862.

Moore, Samuel H., private, July 25, 1861, three years; killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862.

Mock, Abraham, private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged August 20, 1861.

McBride, Samuel, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

McMillen, Shrader, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

McTigue, Stephen, private, July 25, 1861, three years; prisoner at Gaines’s Mill, Va., June 27, 1862; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

McCartney, Jacob, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

McMillen, Thomas, private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged October 20, 1862.

McEwen, Thomas B., private, July 25, 1861, three years; killed at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862.

McGarvey, Hugh, private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged November 15, 1862.

McCannaha, Jackson, private, July 25, 1861, three years; died at Washington, D.C., October 15, 1861.

Ong, William, private, August 20, 1861, three years; deserted from company and joined Company K, One Hundred and Fifty-fifth P.V., September 1, 1861.

Polin, Henry, private, July 25, 1861, three years; transferred to Invalid Corps September 1, 1863.

Pysher, Stephen G., private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged October 23, 1862.

Pence, James, private, July 25, 1861, three years; wounded at Gettysburg,. Pa.; re-enlisted as veteran volunteer February 8, 1864.

Reynolds, W.N., private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Redick, Alexander, private, July 25, 1861, three years; died January 3, 1863; buried in Military Asylum Cemetery, D.C.

Riley, John, private, March 26, 1864, three years; transferred to Company G, One Hundred and Fifty-fifth Regiment.

Snyder, Samuel T., private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Sampson, Charles, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Sage, Joel, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Salade, Harvey J., private, July 25, 1861, three years; absent at muster out.

Stewart, Henry, private, July 25, 1861, three years; killed at Gaines’s Mill, Va., June 27, 1862.

Smith, Daniel D., private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged November 15, 1862, for wounds received at Malvern Hill July 1, 1862.

Shick, Joseph, private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged July 1862.

Stover, John, private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged on account of wounds received at Malvern Hill.

Shannon, Irwin M., private, January 28, 1862, three years; discharged December 10, 1862.

Shannon, Philip M., private, January 28, 1862, three years; discharged December 10, 1862.

Springer, George W., private, July 25, 1861, three years; deserted September 28, 1861.

Timms, William, private, July 25, 1861, three years; killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862.

Turney, Simon P., private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged February 24, 1863.

Wyman, Samuel, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Wagoner, Solomon, private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Wyman, Decatur S., private, July 25, 1861, three years; killed at Malvern Hill, Va., July 1, 1862.

Williams, Walter L., private, July 25, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 13, 1864.

Williams, John L., private, July 25, 1861, three years; died June 9, 1864; buried in the National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.

Wilson, Joseph, private, July 25, 1861, three years; discharged April 16, 1863.

Winket, William A., private, February 7, 1862, three years; killed at Malvern Hill, Va., July 1, 1862.

SOURCE:  Page(s) 167-178, History of Clarion County, A.J. Davis, A.J.; Syracuse, N.Y.: D. Mason & Co. 1887