Chapter 15 - Company E, Thirty-Ninth Regiment - Tenth Reserve

Created: Thursday, 25 March 2010 Last Updated: Tuesday, 25 February 2014 Written by Nathan Zipfel Print Email

CHAPTER XV


COMPANY E, THIRTY-NINTH REGIMENT - TENTH RESERVE


Organization - Route to the Field - Service in the Field - Losses - Record of Hugh Wilson- Roll of Company.

ON Friday of the May court in 1861, Brigadier-General R. Laughlin, commanding the First Brigade of the Twelfth Division of the Pennsylvania Militia, organized a company at Clarion under the militia act of 1849. The company was named the "Clarion River Guards," and J.B. Knox, esq., was chosen captain. General Laughlin had letters from the brigade inspector to proceed with the organization of companies in the absence of that officer. The Clarion River Guards encamped at Curllsville with other companies of the brigade early in June, 1861. Captain Knox was commissioned in the State service on the 14th of June, and on the 24th of June he sent out written orders from Clarion to the members of the company which he had recruited, notifying them to report at that town, and be ready to move to Pittsburgh on the 1st of July. Almost the entire company reported, and they proceeded by way of Reidsburg and Curllsville to Watterson’s Ferry, where they got aboard an old canal boat, and floated down the Allegheny River to Kittanning. From there they proceeded by rail to Camp, Wright, where they arrived on the 3d of July. On the 4th the company took a holiday, and most of the men spent the day in Pittsburgh, as Camp Wright was only twelve miles above the city. On the 5th of July eighty-one men of the Guards were sworn into the service of the State, making with Captain Knox, .a total of eighty-two men.

On the 15th of July the company was joined by fifteen other members, who, being mustered in, increased the roster of the company to ninety-seven men; officered as follows: J.B. Knox, captain; David R. Craig, first lieutenant; Valentine Phipps, second lieutenaut; and other officers as noted in the roster which follows this sketch.

At Camp Wright the Clarion River Guards were assigned to the Tenth Regiment Pennsylvania Reserves, and designated as Company E. The Tenth had been partly organized in the latter part of June at Camp Wilkins, also near Pittsburgh. Camp Wilkins was very unhealthful on account of its uncleanliness; however, good, wholesome rations were plentifully and regularly supplied, and immediately after entering camp the men were supplied with a superior grade of blankets. That portion of the regiment which had assembled at Camp Wilkins removed to Camp Wright on the 1st of July, and on the arrival of those troops which completed the regiment, the organization was perfected, and the officers who had been elected at Camp Wilkins proceeded to drill and discipline the troops. The officers were, colonel, John S. McCalmont, a regular army officer, from Venango county, also a West Point graduate; lieutenant-colonel, James T. Kirk, formerly captain of Company D; and major, Harrison Allen, formerly captain of Company H.

The regiment was ordered to Cumberland, Md., July 18. It proceeded to Huntingdon, thence to Bedford Springs, by rail. Here the order was countermanded and the regiment was dispatched hastily to Harrisburg where it was mustered into the United States service July 21, antedating all other Clarion county companies in that respect. Captain Lemon’s company was the first recruited, the first in camp, the first to enter the State service, and the first to reach Washington, but Captain Knox’s company was the first to enter the United States service. It was mustered in the same day the battle of Bull Run was fought, and on account of the anxiety and suspense, it was hurriedly taken to Baltimore late in the afternoon of July 22. It took possession of the open square near the depot and bivouacked there till the evening of July 23, when with loaded guns and fixed bayonets it marched to the common south of the city. July 24 it went on to Washington. At the depot it met some New York troops who had been in the battle of Bull Run. The sight of these wounded and maimed men produced a profound impression on the members of the Tenth, and they then began to realize the terrible work upon which they were entering.

The regiment marched about a mile east of the capitol and encamped. On the 1st of August it left this place and proceeded to the reserve camp at Tenallytown. It served a week on picket duty at Great Falls early in September. The regiment was drilled at Camp Tenally, and it also observed the usual camp duty. General McCall pronounced it well drilled. It was assigned to the Third Brigade. Colonel McCalmont first commanded the brigade, but was succeeded by Brigadier-General E.O.C. Ord. The regiment marched into Virginia and took position in line with the army October 10. On the 20th of December the brigade engaged the enemy, under Stuart at Dranesville. The skirmish began a little past noon and resulted in a Federal victory, which had .a good effect on the army, as it served to counteract the bad effect produced by the Union disaster at Ball’s Bluff, October 21. The Tenth sustained no loss at Dranesville. Major Allen resigned February 14, on account of ill health, and Adjutant Sion B. Smith was elected major. He was succeeded by Sergeant-Major O.H. Gaither, who was appointed adjutant.

After several weeks spent in moving from place to place in the early spring of 1862, the Reserves were attached to General McDowell’s command, which was charged with the defense of Washington. They were now lying in the vicinity of Fredericksburg, which place they had reached via Alexandria, Fairfax, Centreville, and Manassas. While in the neighborhood of Fredericksburg General Ord was transferred from the command of the Third Brigade to the command of a division, and Brigadier-General Truman Seymour succeeded to the command of the Third Brigade. Colonel McCalmont resigned May 9, and Lieutenant-Colonel James T. Kirk was elected to succeed him. Captain A.J. Warner, of Company G, was elected lieutenant-colonel. The regiment was detached from McDowell’s Corps, and ordered to reinforce General McClellan on the Peninsula. It went by water to the White House on the Pamunky. Having marched from the White House to the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the Tenth was attached to the corps commanded by General Fitz John Porter, which occupied the left bank of the Chickahominy. The battle of Mechanicsville was fought on the 26th of June. In that sanguinary struggle Company E received its first baptism of fire, and was consecrated to the cause of the Union by the blood of the first of its members who were killed in battle.

During the battle of Mechanicsville the Tenth lay close to the right of the road leading into Mechanicsville. It faced up the Chickahominy, and looked down into Beaver Dam Creek, which flows into the Chickahominy a short distance below the bridge over which the road passes which has just been mentioned. The Ninth lay on the left of the Tenth and connected with it at the road near the bridge, where there was an embankment by an old mill. The Union troops were on this side of Beaver Dam Creek facing Mechanicsville, and the Confederates on the Mechanicsville side. The creek is here sluggish. On both sides of it the ground is swampy, and was at that time covered with a growth of underwood. On the Mechanicsville side the distance from the brow of the hill down the slope to the creek bottom is about eighty rods. Down this slope the enemy would have to march to attack the Federal troops. Meantime the Tenth had improved its time by digging rifle pits along the slope on its side of the creek. This was its first experience in that line of duty. The work was directed by Captain McDaniel, of Company D, and Lieutenant Joseph B. Pattee, of Company B. As soon as they were completed a portion of the regiment was posted in these pits, while another part was placed in position in the woods to the right of them. Company C and Company I were put forward as skirmishers. Just in the rear of the Tenth was stationed Easton’s Battery. Thus stood facing each other, these two portions of two great armies. They were soon to enact the first carnival of death in which many of them had ever borne a part, and as the men nervously, fearfully, resolutely, and bravely grasped their weapons of death and anxiously awaited the moment when the awful silence would be broken, it indeed seemed to many of them the "pause of carnage- the brink of fate."

The Confederates advanced down the slope on the Mechanicsville side of the creek, along the road and through the fields; but scarcely had they began the descent when Easton’s Battery belched forth its iron hail and poured into their ranks a rapid and constant fire. Still on they came until within rifle range, when they were met with a terrible fire from the rifle pits and from the banks along the old mill dam.

They fought hard, but human flesh and blood could not endure such terrible slaughter, and they were forced back up the slope. They rallied and came on again to the attack; struggling desperately and frantically to turn the tide of victory toward their hoped for Confederacy. They concentrated their efforts to pass the bridge and break the Union line, but they were met by men as brave and efficient as themselves. Every attack was repulsed with remarkable vigor by the Ninth and the Tenth, and with broken columns and slaughtered warriors, the enemy was driven from the field, when night mercifully put an end to the conflict. The enemy had gained nothing in this battle, and the result was due largely to the Reserve and to Easton’s Battery. Schmucker says:

"The Pennsylvania Reserves on the left, commanded by Seymour and Reynolds, also fought with much heroism, and succeeded in defeating the attempts of the rebels to cross the bridge over the Chickahominy."

In this battle the Tenth preserved its line intact, and the troops were in an exultant mood when night brought the battle to a close.

Captain Knox’s Company E lost two men. Both were killed. They were John C. Phillips and James G. Treyzulany. This being the first battle for Company E, the sketch details the movement of the regiment. Notes of subsequent battles will be made mainly, with reference to the company only.

About half past three o’clock P.M., June 27, the company became engaged in the bloody battle of Gaines’s Mill. During the struggle it had two men killed- Alpheus Reynard and Amos Kieser. The following were wounded: Lieutenants Valentine Phipps, James L. Wray, and Charles McLaughlin; Corporals Samuel Waley and Samuel S. Wilson; Privates Mathew Black, Thomas Henderson, Daniel Keely, Patrick McLaughlin, George Stiner, John H. Sloan, David Whitehill, Elliott G. Walter, and David Yates- fourteen in all. The wounds of Mathew Black, Thomas Henderson, and John H. Sloan proved fatal. Lieutenant Charles McLanghlin, Sergeant F.M. Lewis, and Private Elliott G. Walter were taken prisoners The regiment made a valiant and effective charge about five o’clock, and when the battle ceased, it closed its broken ranks and retired across the Chickahominy.

In the fighting at Charles City Cross Roads, June 30, Sebastian Cook, Henry Miller, and George W. Wilson were wounded. On account of their wounds Cook and Wilson were discharged. No further losses were sustained by the company during the Seven Days’ fight.

The regiment was at Malvern Hill, but was not seriously engaged in the fight. Burton Turney was taken prisoner July 1, 1862. From Malvern Hill it went to Harrison’s Landing, where Major Sion B. Smith resigned, and Captain Knox, of Company E, was promoted to major, August 15, 1862, and on the same day Lieutenant Phipps became captain of the company.

During the second battle of Bull Run, on the 29th of August, Company E had the following wounded: Second Lieutenant N.B. McWilliams, and Privates Celin S. Kapp and Davis McBride. Kapp’s wounds proved fatal. The regiment was now under Pope in the "Army of Virginia." On the 31st of August Hugh Wilson* was taken prisoner.

While joining in the stubborn contest which the Tenth sustained at South Mountain, September 14, Company E had three wounded- Sergeant George F. Kapp, and Privates Fred Brenneman and David Yates.

Immediately after the battle of Antietam, in which the company took part without loss of any kind, Major Knox was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and Captain Ayer, of Company I, succeeded him as major. On the hard-fought field of Fredericksburg, Lieutenant-Colonel Knox led the Tenth, and was highly commended for his skill and bravery. Fredericksburg was fought December 13, and in this engagement Company E suffered severely. Sergeants Allen W. Corbett and Thomas Vausden, and Privates John Disel and Daniel V. Jones were killed. The following fifteen were wounded: First Sergeant F.M. Lewis; Sergeants John D. Lyon and Samuel D. Grable; Corporals George B. Kieser, David Craig, and Harrison Whitehill, and Privates Fred Brenneman, Henry C. Barr, James K. Clark, William R. Livingstone, Henry Miller, George Stiner, David Smith, Robert Whitehill, and James W. Ganoe. James K. Clark was discharged for wounds here received. David Smith, Robert Whitehill, and William Young were captured. May 1, 1863, William R. Shippen was promoted to regimental quartermaster.

The Tenth reached Gettysburg at nine o’clock, July 2, 1863, having spent the winter and spring in and around Washington, and having been ordered to join the Fifth Corps in its northward march to assist in repelling the rebel invasion of Pennsylvania. In the afternoon of July 2 the regiment was engaged near Round Top and between that point and Little Round Top. It was also engaged on the 3d. The regiment lost two killed and four wounded. James G. Wyon, of Company E, was one of the wounded.

On account of ill health, Lieutenant-Colonel James B. Knox resigned November 23, 1863, and Major Ayer took command. On the 27th of February, 1864, Major Ayer was commissioned lieutenant-colonel.

On the 6th of May, 1864, in the Wilderness, Jacob Raifsnider was killed, and Reynolds Bole wounded. On the 9th of May Reed M. Mills was wounded, and on the same day, at Laurel Hill, Silas Davis was mortally wounded. On the 6th, Colonel Ayer was severely wounded, and being borne from the field, Captain Phipps commanded the regiment. Raifsnider was the only one of the regiment killed. On the 30th of May, 1864, Corporal David Craig was wounded. Captain Phipps was breveted major on the field at the Wilderness. The company was mustered out at Pittsburgh June 11, 1864. Of Company E, the following are known to have died since the war: Colonel Knox, Tolbert Dale, John D. Lyon, Reed Mills, Clarence Wilson, Adam Rankin, William Vesey, John M. Laughlin, and Davis McBride. Of these Lyon, Mills, and McBride died violent deaths. Lyon was killed by a log rolling on him; Mills by a chain breaking and hitting him on the head, and McBride by a horse falling on him.

Colonel Knox was elected president-judge in 1881, for the Clarion-Jefferson district. He died at Brookville, where he had been holding court. Captain Phipps was once elected county commissioner for Clarion county.

Of this company, let it be observed, it numbered all told one hundred and sixteen men; two of its members were promoted to field officers; one was breveted; three resigned; ten were killed in battle; thirty-eight were wounded; five died from wounds; six died of disease; four were discharged for wounds; twenty-two were discharged for sickness and other causes; two were discharged by sentence of court martial; two deserted; eight were taken prisoners; thirty were transferred; and forty were mustered out with the regiment.

Bates says of the regiment: "The remnant of this brave and once strong body of men, which had fought in nearly every battle in which the Army of the Potomac had been engaged, and which was not excelled in valor by any other organization of the division, was mustered out of service at Pittsburgh."

ROLL OF COMPANY E, TENTH RESERVE.

James B. Knox, captain, June 14, 1861, three years; promoted to major August 15, 1862.

Valentine Phipps, captain, July 5, 1861, three years; promoted from second to first lieutenant August 12, 1861 wounded at Gaines’s Mill, June 27, 1862; promoted to captain August 15, 1862; to brevet major; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

David R. Craig, first lieutenant July 5, 1861, three years; resigned August 7, 1861.

James L. Wray, first lieutenant, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862; resigned December 10, 1862.

Charles McLaughlin, first lieutenant, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded and taken prisoner at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862; promoted from first sergeant to first lieutenant June 4, 1863; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

N.B. McWilliams, second lieutenant, July 5, 1861, three years; promoted from sergeant to second lieutenant August 1, 1862; wounded at Bull Run August 29, 1862; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Charles McLaughlin, first sergeant, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate March 12, 1863.

Francis M. Lewis, first sergeant, July 5, 1861, three years; taken prisoner at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Samuel D. Grable, sergeant, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

J.J. Greenawalt, sergeant, July 5, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Tolbert Dale, sergeant, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate June 21, 1862.

Smith Strickler, sergeant, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate December 31, 1863.

Daniel Black, sergeant, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate August 22, 1862.

William H. Fetzer, sergeant, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate December 1, 1851.

John D. Lyon, sergeant, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862; transferred to One Hundred and Ninety-first Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864, veteran.

George F. Kapp, sergeant, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at South Mountain September 14, 1864; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864, veteran.

George B. Kieser, corporal, July 15, 1861, three years; wounded at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862; mustered-out with company June 11, 1864.

Samuel Kieser, corporal, July 15, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Samuel Waley, corporal, July 15, 1861, three years; wounded at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

David Craig, corporal, July 15, 1861, three years; wounded at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862, and at Bethesda Church May 30, 1864; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Simon Mohney, corporal, July 15, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Hugh Carson, corporal, June 15, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate October 31, 1862.

William Vesey, corporal, July 15, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate, date unknown.

William R. Shippen, corporal, July 3, 1861, three years; promoted to first lieutenant and regimental quartermaster May 1, 1863.

Harrison Whitehill, corporal, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864, veteran.

Samuel Wilson, corporal, September 1, 1861, three years; wounded at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Allen W. Corbett, corporal, July 5, 1861, three years; killed at Fredericksburgh December 13, 1862.

Thomas Vausden, corporal, July 5, 1861, three years; killed at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862.

Alsbaugh, Oliver P., private, September 1, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate, date unknown.

Agnew, Joshua B., private, July 5, 1861, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864, veteran.

Agnew, Samuel, private, August 20, 1862, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Ayres, James, private, July 5, 1861, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 30, 1864, veteran.

Allen, Isaac, private, September 1, 1861, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Breneman, Fred, private, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at South Mountain September 14, 1862, and at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Brush, George, private, July 5, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Bole, Reynolds, private, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at Wilderness May 6, 1864; mustered out June 23, 1864.

Best, William, private, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged May 4, 1864, by sentence of general court martial.

Bales, John W., private, August 4, 1862, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Barr, Henry C., private, August 20, 1862, three years; wounded at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Black, Mathew, private, July 5, 1861, three years; died of wounds received at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862.

Callihan, Robert, private, July 5, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Cook, Sebastian, private, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged January 15, 1863, for wounds received at Charles City Cross Roads June 30, 1862.

Clark, James K., private, July 6, 1861, three years; discharged June 3, 1863, for wounds received at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862.

Cyphert, George, private, March 20, 1862, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Craig, Adam, private, August 12; 1862, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Dixon, George, private, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate February 9, 1863.

Disel, John, private, September 1, 1861, three years; killed at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862.

Davis, Silas, private, August 20, 1862, three years; died of wounds received at Laurel Hill May 9, 1864.

Eminger, John H., private, July 15, 1861, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Eminger, Daniel B., private, July 15, 1861, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Foreman, Miles, private, July 5, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Ferry, Patrick T., private, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate May 15, 1863.

Farringer, William, private, September 1, 1862, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Gates Henry, private, July 15, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Ganoe, James W., private, July 15, 1861, three years; wounded at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862; discharged on surgeon’s certificate March 16, 1863.

Grace, George, private, July 15, 1861, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864, veteran.

Henry, Calvin B., private, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate December 1, 1861.

Holmes, Alvin B., private, July 5, 1861, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864, veteran.

Henderson, Thomas, private, June 5, 1861, three years; died of wounds received at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1861.

James, Jasper N., private, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged February 11, 1864, by sentence of general court martial.

Jones, Daniel V., private, July 5, 1861, three years; killed at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862.

Keely, John, private, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate, date unknown.

Kapp, Celin S., private, July 5, 1861, three years; died of wounds received at Bull Run August 29, 1862.

Kieser, Amos, private, July 5, 1861, three years; killed at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862.

Keely, Daniel, private, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, date unknown.

Livingston, William R., private, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Lewis, John A., private, July 5, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Lewis, Thomas E.H., private, July 5, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Lewis, Thomas E., private, July 5, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Lowe, Henry A., private, July 5, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Lindsay, John, private, August 20, 1862, three years; transferred to One-Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Laughlin, John M., private, July 5, I 86i, three years; transferred to Company A, One Hundred

and Third Regiment P.V., by promotion to second lieutenant June 12, 1862.

Miller, Henry, private, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at Charles City Cross Roads June 30, and at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Morgan, William, private, July 5, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Morris, Harvey, private, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate December 6, 1861.

Magee, John A., private, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate January 7, 1863.

Mills, Reed M., private, August 12, 1862, three years; wounded at Wilderness May 9, 1864; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

McCoy, Joseph, private, July 5, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

McBride, Davis, private, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at second Bull Run; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

McKenzie, Thomas, private, July 5, 1861, three years; transferred to Battery C, Fifth U.S. Artillery, April 1, 1862.

McLaughlin, Patrick, private, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

McLaughlin, Edward, private, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate December 6, 1861.

McClune, Charles R., private, August 12, 1862, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Ogden, James C., private, July 5, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Parsons, Silas W., private, July 15, 1861, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Phillips, John C., private, July 15, 1861, three years; killed at Mechanicsville June 26, 1862.

Randolph, Harmon, private, July 5, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Rankin, Adam A., private, July 5, 1861, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864, veteran.

Raifsnider, Jacob, private, July 5, 1861, three years; killed at Wilderness May 6, 1864, veteran.

Reynard, Alpheus, private, July 5, 1861, three years; killed at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862.

Reeser, Charles A., private, July 5, 1861, three years; deserted August 12, 1862.

Stiner, George W., private, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862, and at Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Spence, Ashabald, private, July 5, 1861, three years; prisoner at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862 ; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Smith, David, private, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded and prisoner at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Strickler, David E., private, July 5, 1861, three years; mustered out with company July 11, 1864.

Sloan, David P., private, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate December 1, 1861.

Stigers, John, private, July 5, 1861, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864, veteran.

Stover, Aquilla, private, September I, 1861, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Sloan, David A., private, July 5, 1861, three years; died February, 1862, at Camp Pierpont, Va.

Sloan, John H., private, July 5, 1861, three years; died of wounds received at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862.

Sample, James C., private, July 5, 1861, three years; deserted August 2, 1862.

Turney, Burton, private, July 5, 1861, three years; prisoner July 1, 1861; mustered out with company July 11, 1864.

Trainer, James A., private, July 5, 1861, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864, veteran.

Travis, Samuel L., private, July 5, 1861, three years; killed at Gaines’s Mill, June 27, 1862.

Treyzulina, Jas. G., private, July 5, 1861, three years; killed at Mechanicsville June 26, 1862.

Whitehill, David, private, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Walter, Elliott G., private, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded and prisoner at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Wilson, George W., private, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged October 17, 1862, for wounds received at Charles City Cross Roads, June 30, 1862.

Wilson, Clarence B., private, September 1, 1861, three years; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Wyon, James G., private, July 15, 1861, three years; wounded at Gettysburg July 2, 1863; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Whitehall, Robert, private, August 20, 1862, three years; wounded and prisoner at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862; transferred to One Hundred and Ninetieth Regiment P.V., May 31, 1864.

Wilson**, Hugh, private, July 5, three years; transferred to Battery C, U.S. Artillery.

Yates, David, private, July 5, 1861, three years; wounded at Gaines’s Mill June 27, 1862, and South Mountain September 15, 1862; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Young, Robert, private, July 5, 1861, three years; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Young, William, private, July 5, 1861, three years; prisoner at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862; mustered out with company June 11, 1864.

Young, Jerome W., private, July 5, 1861, three years; discharged on surgeon’s certificate March 24, 1863.

 
* In volume I of Bates’s "History of Pennsylvania Volunteers" on page 834 the remark opposite the name "Hugh Wilson" reads, "Deserted August 26, 1862." Hugh Wilson did not desert. In the autumn of 1861 he was prostrated with typhoid fever. In December he joined the regiment and went into active service. The effect of the fever and subsequent exposure rendered him unfit for service during a portion of the spring and summer of 1862. While suffering from yellow jaundice he was offered a discharge, but refused to accept it. At Harrison’s Landing, being much worse, he, applied for a discharge, but did not get one. He continued to grow weaker, until at the time of the series of battles beginning August 24 and ending September 1, he was so worn down and exhausted by chronic diarrhea that he could not endure the fatigue of that succession of engagements. On the 29th, while the regiment was making a rapid march toward Washington, Wilson found it impossible to keep pace with it, and he was left on its line of march. He wearied along to the water, drank, seemed revived, and tried to get back into the Union lines. He tramped around and hid from the enemy until some time in the morning of the 31st of August, when a body of Confederates came upon him, and he was captured. He was paroled and sent to Harper’s Ferry; thence to Parole Camp, at Columbus, Ohio. About the 1st of December, 1862, he was exchanged, and being considered incapacitated for infantry service, he was transferred on a special order from the War Department to the mounted service, and assigned to Battery C, Third United States Artillery, and mounted in General Custer’s Brigade, Kilpatrick’s Division of Cavalry, Army of the Potomac. The officer commanding Company E certified Wilson to the commander of Battery C as having a correct record. In 1867 or 1868 Wilson applied for the one hundred dollars additional pay due him. He was astonished to receive notice from the War Department that he was on the rolls as a deserter. He applied to the commissioned officers of Company E, who promptly made affidavit that Wilson was not a deserter. He thereupon received his additional pay, and is now a pensioner. The subject of this note is known throughout Clarion county as Cal. Wilson, He is a respected resident of Cullensburg borough, and is now a justice of the peace. W.A. BEER.

** See foot note, page 156.

SOURCE:  Page(s) 152-164, History of Clarion County, A.J. Davis, A.J.; Syracuse, N.Y.: D. Mason & Co. 1887