History of Warren County, Chapter 21

CHAPTER XXI
ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTEENTH AND ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIFTH REGIMENTS

 

The One Hundred and Thirteenth Regiment of the Line or Twelfth Cavalry - Organized near Philadelphia - Joins Pope in Virginia - Subsequent Services in the Shenandoah Valley - The First Command to Discover Lee’s Northward Movement in 1863 - Nearly Surrounded at Winchester - Cutting its Way Out - On the Upper Potomac - In Pursuit of Early - Its Last Battle - Muster Out - Roster of Company K - One Hundred and Forty-fifth Regiment - Company F Recruited at Tidioute - The Regiment is Ordered to the Front Without Adequate Equipments - In Line at Antietam - Assigned to the Second Corps - Its Desperate Struggle at Fredericksburg - Great Losses - Chancellorsville - With Hancock at Gettysburg - In the Wilderness with Grant - Charging the Enemy’s Works at Spottsylvania - Cold Harbor - Petersburg - Part of the Regiment Captured - Other Movements and Battles - Names, etc., of Its Warren County Members.

 

ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTEENTH REGIMENT - TWELFTH CAVALRY.

THIS command, of which Major Darius Titus, of Warren county, was one of its original officers, was organized near Philadelphia late in the autumn of 1861. It remained there until about the 1st of May, 1862, when it was ordered to Washington, D.C., where it received arms. On the 20th of June it was ordered to Manassas Junction, and was employed in guarding the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. It was past the middle of July, however, before the command was mounted, and little progress had been made in training and discipline before active operations commenced.

At midday of the 26th of August Colonel Pierce received a telegram from General Sturgis, at Alexandria, acting under the direction of General Pope, then in command of the Union forces in Northern Virginia, directing him to proceed to White Plains and ascertain the strength and position of the enemy in that locality. Colonel Pierce, who was in a feeble state of health, and in the absence of Lieutenant-Colonel Kohler, placed the regiment under command of Major Titus. The regiment was scattered along the road, a distance of twelve miles, on guard, and it was six o’clock before the forces could be assembled and in readiness to start. Darkness soon came on, and, being without reliable guides, and having a distance of twenty miles to traverse in an enemy’s country, some difficulty was experienced in keeping the direct route. One company was left at Pope’s Run, and a battery of two pieces at Manassas. In the neighborhood of Gainesville a rebel picket was captured, who disclosed the fact that half the rebel army was in its immediate front, "Stonewall" Jackson having turned the right of Pope’s army. Soon firing was heard at Manassas, and a great light showed but too plainly that the enemy was already in possession. Without stopping for rest the column retired towards Bristoe; but as it approached the town found it already occupied by Jackson, with his artillery and infantry in commanding positions. To escape the enemy’s clutches seemed impossible; but, determined to cut his way through or sell his command at severe rebel cost, Major Titus turned towards Manassas. Discovering his designs the enemy opened with his artillery and infantry, and closing in upon it inflicted a loss of two hundred and sixty in killed, wounded, and prisoners - Major Titus being among the latter.

The command now devolved on Major Congdon, who withdrew his shattered column to Centreville. He was immediately ordered to retire to Alexandria, where he reported to General McClellan in person, giving the first reliable intelligence of the presence of Jackson at Manassas. On the following day the regiment was ordered to cross the Potomac, and patrol and picket the left bank of the river from the Chain Bridge to Edward’s Ferry, in which duty it continued until the enemy crossed above, to enter upon the Antietam campaign.

During the battle of Antietam, the command rendered efficient service in watching the enemy’s movements upon our flanks and in bringing up stragglers and checking disorder. Subsequently it participated in the raid on Moorefield, the expedition to Woodstock, and a hot encounter at Fisher’s Hill. When Lee so stealthily left his camps on the Rapidan, and began his march into Pennsylvania in June, 1863, the Twelfth was the first to discover the movement, though the facts as reported by the commander of the regiment were at first discredited. This delusion was soon dissipated, however, and the correctness of the report made apparent, by the advance of the whole of Lee’s army on all the roads leading from the south. As Lee continued to advance down the valley, General Milroy, in command of the Union forces, posted his small army in an advantageous position, at Winchester, Va., and for three days held the entire rebel army in check with a force of less than twelve thousand men. The enemy refused to assault, but gradually gathered in around the town, until nearly every way of escape was cut off. At a council of war, held on the night of Sunday, June 14, it was decided that an attempt should be made by the command to cut its way out, and push for the Potomac. Under cover of darkness the brigade moved out a little after midnight, in the order of their numbers. Four miles out, on the Martinsburg road, the enemy was encountered in strong force, and a heavy night engagement took place, in which the Twelfth participated, sustaining considerable loss. Lieutenant-Colonel Moss, in command of the regiment, had his horse shot under him, and was severely injured by the fall, the command then devolving on Major Titus.* Taking advantage of the noise of the contest, Milroy’s troops separated into two columns, to their mutual advantage, one moving towards Harper’s Ferry, the other, by way of Bath and Hancock, to Bloody Run. The Twelfth was with the latter.

At the close of the Gettysburg campaign the Twelfth marched to Sharpsburg, Md., where it remained until August 3. It then moved to the vicinity of Martinsburg, Va., where it performed scouting and picket duty until the opening of the campaign in May, 1864. Meanwhile many of the men had re-enlisted, and its ranks were otherwise strengthened by recruits. When the rebel Early made his demonstration on Washington in the summer of 1864, he was, in his advance and retreat, opposed and harassed at every step by the Union cavalry under General Averell. The Twelfth was a conspicuous organization in this command, and it rode in the thickest of the fray at Solomon’s Gap, Pleasant Valley, Crampton’s Gap, Winchester, and Kernstown. Upon the accession of General Sheridan to the chief command of the army in the Shenandoah Valley, the regiment was assigned to General Torbert’s Division. Under that general it participated in many other minor actions in the same valley, which continued to afford an ample field for hostile demonstrations until the close of the war. Its last battle was fought at Hamilton, Va., March 22, 1865, where it sustained a loss of six killed and nineteen wounded. It was mustered out of service at Winchester, Va., July 20, and returned in a body to Philadelphia.

The Warren county men in this regiment served chiefly in Company K, whose members were accounted for at muster out as follows:

COMPANY K.

Captain Nathaniel Payne, discharged April 21, 1865, expiration of term.

First Lieutenant Addison R. Titus, discharged April 3, 1865, expiration of term.

First Lieutenant Harvey Russell, mustered out with company; veteran.

Second Lieutenant Deloss Chase, killed at Hamilton, Va., March 22, 1865.

Second Lieutenant Stephen B. Sterrett, mustered out with company; veteran.

First Sergeant John Thomas, mustered out with company; veteran.

Quartermaster-Sergeant George H. Sill, absent on detailed service at muster out; veteran.

Sergeant William G. Lambertson, mustered out with company; veteran.

Sergeant Coryell Douglass, mustered out with company; veteran.

Sergeant Charles T. Widdifield, mustered out with company; veteran.

Sergeant George H. Hollman, mustered out with company; veteran.

Sergeant Andrew J. Burns, mustered out with company; veteran.

Sergeant Nathaniel Siggins, discharged April 25, 1865, expiration of term.

Corporal Andy Daum, discharged by general order June 3, 1865; veteran.

Corporal Thomas Nelson, mustered out with company; veteran.

Corporal Augustus L. Selden, mustered out with company; veteran.

Corporal John H. Siggins, mustered out with company; veteran.

Corporal Darius M. Ford, mustered out with company; veteran.

Corporal Merrill D. Morley, mustered out with company; veteran.

Corporal John H. Green, discharged on surgeon’s certificate June 5, 1865.

Blacksmith Isaac Douglass, mustered out with company; veteran.

Farrier Erastus Mead, mustered out with company; veteran.

Saddler George F. Green, mustered out with company.

Privates.

John Anderson, mustered out with company.

Riley Averill, mustered out with company.

George W. Arters, mustered out with company.

John A. Aikens, mustered out with company; veteran.

William A. Beddow, mustered out with company; veteran.

Charles F. Black, mustered out with company.

John Black, mustered out with company.

John D. Beebe, mustered out with company; veteran.

Jared L. Barton, mustered out with company; veteran.

Perry L. Barton, mustered out with company.

William F. Burdick, mustered out with company.

Adam Bonn, discharged April 25, 1865, expiration of term.

Thomas Bohn, died of wounds received at Charlestown, Va., February 7, 1865.

Samuel Burris, discharged by general order June 1, 1865.

George W. Briggs, discharged December 6, 1865; veteran.

James Brogan, discharged by general order November 18, 1865; veteran.

Charles Covell, mustered out with company; veteran.

John Cook, mustered out with company.

James E. Clark, mustered out with company.

James Carroll, absent, sick, at muster out.

Peter Conway, discharged on surgeon’s certificate January 20, 1865.

William Cosgrove, discharged April 21, 1865, expiration of term.

William H. Clark, discharged by general order June 1, 1865.

Luther Carpenter, discharged, date unknown.

John Davis, mustered out with company.

Frederick Deiter, mustered out with company.

Chauncey Dunbar, discharged by general order June 22, 1865.

Andrew Diven, discharged by general order June 1, 1865.

Albert E. Ellsworth, discharged April 1, 1865, expiration of term.

Nathaniel C. Enos, killed at Hamilton, Va., March 22, 1865; veteran.

Jacob Frey, discharged by general order June 1, 1865.

Abraham Garlick, mustered out with company.

John C. Griffin, discharged by general order June 1, 1865.

William J. Griffin, discharged by general order June 1, 1865.

Adam Garlick, discharged by general order November 24, 1865.

Michael Heintz, mustered out with company.

Robert W. Hudson, discharged by general order March 7, 1865.

Alfred S. Hatfield, died April 3, 1865.

Martin Illtis, mustered out with company.

George W. Irvine, discharged April 21, 1865, expiration of term.

Augustus Jones, mustered out with company; veteran.

William Johnson, discharged by general order June 1, 1865.

Samuel Jones, discharged on surgeon’s certificate August 26, 1862.

Frederick Knapp, mustered out with company.

Alanson Kibly, absent, sick, at muster out.

Henry C. Keefer, discharged by general order June 1, 1865.

Jason Libby, mustered out with company.

James Lesh, mustered out with company; veteran.

John Lindsey, discharged by general order June 1, 1865.

Monroe Martin, transferred to Company B, date unknown; veteran.

William McGinty, discharged by general order March 29, 1865.

Alex. McLaughlin, mustered out with company.

Archibald McDonald, mustered out with company.

William McAuley, discharged on surgeon’s certificate May 26, 1865; veteran.

Charles McCallen, died at Sandy Hook, Md., June 29, 1864.

James McAfee, killed at Hamilton, Va., March 22, 1865.

Jacob Nyheart, mustered out with company.

George H. Nobbs, discharged by general order September 11, 1865; veteran.

Patrick O’Harra, mustered out with company; veteran.

Hiram Parrish, mustered out with company.

Henry Rupp, mustered out with company.

James H. Randall, died, date unknown; buried at Antietam.

Joseph S. Rogers, died August 22, 1862.

Jacob Showalter, mustered out with company.

William Simpson, mustered out with company.

James B. Smith, mustered out with company.

James Smith, mustered out with company.

Jacob Strausbury, mustered out with company.

John W. Slonaker, discharged by general order June 1, 1865.

George Vanguilder, mustered out with company.

William Watt, mustered out with company.

Jacob Weist, discharged by general order June 1, 1865.

Thomas L. Young, absent, sick, at muster out.

ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIFTH REGIMENT.

Company F of this regiment was recruited at Tidioute, by Captain Kimball H. Stiles, in the summer of 1862. The regimental rendezvous was the city of Erie - the camp previously occupied by the Eighty-third and the One Hundred and Eleventh Regiments - where a regimental organization was effected on the 5th of September, 1862. Its original field officers were Hiram L. Brown, colonel; David B. McCreary, lieutenant-colonel; John W. Patton, major. The latter died May 15, of wounds received at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863.

Without arms, and with scarcely any knowledge of military duty, the regiment left Erie on the 11th of September, and proceeded toward the front via Harrisburg to Chambersburg, Pa., arriving in thirty-six hours within sound of the enemy’s cannon, Lee having already crossed the Potomac and penetrated to the South Mountain. Halting at Camp McClure for two days, the men were supplied with the old Harper’s Ferry musket, and then moved under orders from General John F. Reynolds, in the direction of Hagerstown. But partially supplied with equipments, and men and many officers fresh from civil life, the command experienced much suffering from exposure and inadequate supplies.

At daylight on the morning of the 17th the regiment was under arms, the heavy booming of cannon on the field of Antietam, ten miles away, being distinctly heard. Colonel Brown was ordered forward with his command, and a little after noon arrived upon the extreme right of the Union line, at this time desperately engaged with the troops under "Stonewall" Jackson. It was moved into position between the Federal right and the Potomac, holding the tow-path and the road which runs along under the high bluff skirting the river, thus preventing the enemy from flanking the Union forces in that direction. This position was held without loss until McClellan permitted the enemy to retire almost without molestation. The regiment was then assigned to the duty of burying the dead and caring for the wounded. The stench that filled the air was exceedingly offensive - the dead having lain as they fell for four days - and this, together with the exposure and severe duty imposed upon men unaccustomed to campaigning, resulted in wide-spread sickness. Indeed, within a month from the time of taking the field, between two and three hundred men of the regiment were unfit for duty. Many died or were permanently disabled, and were discharged from service.

From Antietam the regiment proceeded to Harper’s Ferry, where it was assigned to duty with Meagher’s Irish Brigade, and continued with that command until just before the beginning of the Fredericksburg campaign, when it was attached to the First Brigade, First Division of the Second Army Corps, and moved with the army under Burnside against the enemy. The morning of December 11 broke clear and crisp along the Rappahannock, and early the whole army was astir. The One Hundred and Forty-fifth, with its division, crossed on the upper pontoon bridge on the afternoon of the 12th, and formed in line upon a street running parallel with the river, where it remained during the succeeding night. On the morning of the 13th it moved forward two or three squares, its right resting near the court-house, where it came under a heavy artillery fire, and an incessant fusillade from sharpshooters concealed from view.

About noon the division marched by the flank up the streets and out upon the plain, between the town and the battery-crowned hills that encircled it beyond. The regiment moved forward with the steadiness of veterans, over various obstacles, towards the fatal stone wall at the foot of Marye’s Heights, though its ranks were shattered and torn by the fire from concealed infantry, and the batteries which confronted and enfiladed it, until it reached the front line of the Union forces. Here it remained until after nightfall, and until the fighting ceased, when the division was relieved and returned to town. "Of the five thousand men," says Swinton, "Hancock led into action, more than two thousand fell in that charge; and it was found that the bravest of these had thrown up their hands and lay dead within five and twenty paces of the stone wall." On the night of the 15th the army recrossed the river, and on the following morning the fragments remaining of the One Hundred and Forty-fifth took possession of its old quarters on Stafford Heights. On the morning previous to the battle five hundred and fifty-six men reported for duty. A portion of two companies were upon the skirmish line when the rest of the regiment moved for the field, and consequently did not accompany it. Of those who crossed the river, less than five hundred in number, two hundred and twenty-six, nearly one half, were either killed or wounded.

On the 1st of May, 1863, while being mustered for pay, the first gun in the battle of Chancellorsville was fired. The Second Corps was immediately thrown forward on the road leading to Fredericksburg, the First Division in advance. At evening it was marched back to a slight ravine, where, in a dense wood, nearly the entire night was spent in throwing up breastworks, and in cutting and forming an abatis in front. The enemy opened fire at intervals upon the troops while at work, but with little effect. At daylight the main body of the command was moved back three-quarters of a mile near to the Chancellor house, a heavy skirmish line only being left in the advanced works. During the day of the 2d artillery firing occurred at intervals, and at night the enemy made his fierce assault, which resulted in the discomfiture and rout of the Eleventh Corps, posted on the extreme right of the Union lines. The night was passed in intense excitement along the whole line, the battle raging fiercely on the right center. On the morning of the 3d a detail of one hundred and fifty men, from the One Hundred and Forty-fifth, and one hundred from other regiments of the brigade, under Lieutenant-Colonel McCreary, was ordered to the relief of the skirmish line left in the works thrown up on the night of the 1st. The remainder of the regiment was engaged in supporting the batteries around the Chancellor house, which had been massed to resist the troops of Jackson, now led by Stuart. It was here exposed to a severe fire of musketry and artillery. Here Major Patton was mortally wounded by a piece of shell. The men under Lieutenant-Colonel McCreary were hotly engaged during the early part of the day, and, with the troops on their right, successfully resisted repeated assaults of the enemy under Anderson and McLaws, and completely foiled all attempts to turn the left and reach Hancock’s main line of battle. When the army fell back towards the river, the troops upon this skirmish line failed to receive the order to retire, and fell into the enemy’s hands, most of the detail from the One Hundred and Forty-fifth being among the captured.

The Second Corps reached the field of Gettysburg on the morning of the 2d of July, the First Division taking position on the left center, and in rear of the line taken up by the Third Corps. Towards evening, and when the lines of the Third Corps had been shattered and driven back, the division was sent to their relief. The brigade, now led by Colonel Brooke, passed over the low grounds to the right of Little Round Top and, crossing the road leading out to the Peach Orchard, soon came upon the Wheat Field, where the battle had raged and was now raging fearfully. With great daring Brooke led his devoted band against the enemy, holding the fastnesses of wood and rock wrenched from the Third Corps, drove him in confusion from his dearly-bought ground, and silenced a battery which was annoying the Union troops. But the advantage, so bravely won, could not be held; for the rebels, in heavy force, were flanking the position on the right and exposing the brigade to capture or annihilation, and no alternative existed but to retire. The One Hundred and Forty-fifth held the extreme right of the brigade in this terrible encounter, and suffered severely. It entered the battle two hundred strong, and lost in killed and wounded more than eighty men. On the 3d the regiment was posted with the division on the left of the corps, and, during the fierce struggle of the afternoon, was exposed to a fearful artillery fire, but in the infantry engagement which followed, was not involved, the enemy being repulsed before it could reach the scene of close conflict.

During the following winter the thinned ranks of the regiment were filled by new recruits, so that at the opening of the spring campaign of 1864 it was ready to again assail the enemy, with nearly its original strength in numbers. The Rapidan was crossed on the 5th of May, and the enemy under Lee was met in the Wilderness. Upon arriving at the Po River, Hancock, who commanded the Second Corps, found the enemy on the opposite bank, in a good defensive position, well fortified. In the face of these obstacles, Hancock, on the afternoon of the 10th, threw a portion of his command across, but subsequently, by order of General Meade, attempted to withdraw it. The enemy, discovering this retrograde movement, immediately attacked with great spirit and determination. The brigades of Brooke and Brown, the former of which included the One Hundred and Forty-fifth, received the weight of the blow; but so determined was the front they presented, and so deadly the volleys that poured into the faces of the foe, that he was forced to retire. At this juncture the woods in the rear of these two brigades took fire from the enemy’s shells, making their position one of great peril. They finally recrossed the river, but not without having sustained serious loss, some of the wounded perishing in the flames, from which it was impossible to rescue them.

Failing to carry the enemy’s position by direct assault, General Grant ordered a blow at his left. The Second Corps was selected to deliver it. Moving over from the extreme right to the left of the Union line, under cover of the darkness of the night of the 11th, Hancock attacked at dawn of the 12th. Barlow’s Division had the advance, Brooke’s and Miles’s Brigades in the first line, Brown’s and Smyth’s in the second. The enemy was taken by surprise. His skirmish line was swept away with but little opposition, and the abatis crossed and the intrenchments carried before he fully realized the situation. But the struggle soon commenced in earnest, and was at close quarters until he was forced to yield the ground, large captures of men and material being made. Attempts to carry his inner line were unsuccessful, and he struggled fiercely to regain his lost works, piling the ground with his slain, but to no purpose. The One Hundred and Forty-fifth was in the lead in this assault and lost heavily. The struggle was continued until the 20th, when the Union army again moved forward and crossed the North Anna, only to encounter again the enemy in impregnable works.

The Second Corps was but little engaged here, and upon recrossing the stream pushed on to Cold Harbor, where, in face of a defiant enemy and over difficult ground, it charged close up to his intrenchments, but failed to carry them. The ground gained was held, and a line of fortifications was thrown up. So close were the opposing lines here, that a stone could be easily tossed from one to the other. It was instant death to expose any vital part of the person. The regiment again suffered severely in gaining and holding this position.

On the 12th of June the corps withdrew from its position at Cold Harbor, and on the night of the 14th the First Division crossed the James. After a long and fatiguing march it arrived in front of Petersburg, and on the evening of the 16th three brigades of the division charged at different points and independently of each other. The movement proved disastrous to the troops engaged, and Lieutenant-Colonel McCreary, commanding the One Hundred and Forty-fifth, together with eight other commissioned officers, and about eighty enlisted men belonging to the regiment, were taken prisoners. The men were hurried away to Andersonville, and the officers to Macon, and were afterwards held at Charleston, Savannah, and Columbia, being kept in confinement until March, 1865, enduring all the hardships and sufferings which at this period were visited upon Union prisoners of war, many yielding up their lives. Only about two hundred men were present for duty when the charge was made, and of this number about fifty were either killed or wounded. On the 22d of July the regiment was again warmly engaged, and in resolutely attempting to hold their position against a superior force of the enemy, a number were killed, wounded, and captured, among the latter Major Lynch, then in command of the survivors.

During the remainder of the summer the handful of men left was ever at the post of duty in the trenches, and almost constantly under fire. It participated in the battles of Reams’s Station and Deep Bottom, sustaining losses in each. It spent the fall and winter in the trenches, in close proximity to the worried enemy, engaged in picket and fatigue duty. Upon the opening of the spring campaign of 1865 the corps was early put in motion, and in the battle of Five Forks the division was detached and sent to the aid of Sheridan, rendering efficient service. After the surrender of Lee the regiment returned through Richmond with the corps, to Alexandria, and a few days later participated in the grand review at Washington, D.C. It was mustered out of service on the 31st of May, and arrived at Erie, Pa., on the 5th of June, when it was disbanded.

Its members, credited to Warren county, were as follows:

 

COMPANY F.

Captain Kimball H. Stiles, discharged June 16, 1864.

First Lieutenant Richard Magill, discharged March 30, 1862.

First Lieutenant Jeremiah Birtcil, discharged June 17, 1864.

Second Lieutenant Stephen H. Evans, discharged March 30, 1863.

Second Lieutenant Louis B. Carlile, discharged May 17, 1865.

First Sergeant Charles C. Merritt, commissioned captain May 22, 1865, not mustered; mustered out with company.

Sergeant John L. Cohell, commissioned first lieutenant May 22, 1865, not mustered; mustered out with company.

Sergeant Charles H. Hill, mustered out with company.

Sergeant William H. Broughton, mustered out with company.

Sergeant O.S. Brown, died, date unknown, of wounds received in action.

Sergeant John T. Roberts, died at Alexandria, Va., June 21, 1864, of wounds received in action.

Sergeant Nicholas Sheppard, not accounted for.

Sergeant Gregory L. Root, wounded at Chancellorsville; discharged, date unknown.

Corporal Benjamin Richards, mustered out with company.

Corporal Jonathan Lemon, mustered out with company.

Corporal Henry Gibbons, mustered out with company.

Corporal Marvin Gilson, taken prisoner; discharged by general order June 29, 1865.

Corporal John Stewart, discharged by general order June 24, 1865.

Corporal Darius W. Hunter, died January 4 of wounds received at Spottsylvania C.H., Va., May 10, 1864.

Corporal Jethro Doty, discharged on surgeon’s certificate, 1863.

Corporal Aaron M. Vincent, not accounted for.

Corporal Wilton M. Lindsey, discharged on surgeon’s certificate January 27, 1863.

Corporal J.H. Richardson, discharged February, 1863, for wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862.

Privates.

George W. Alcorn, captured; died at Andersonville July 28, 1864.

Richard J. Arters, killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862.

Thomas Acox, died near Falmouth, Va., November, 1862.

George W. Arters, discharged on surgeon’s certificate, date unknown.

William Berkey, mustered out with company.

Henry R. Baker, mustered out with company.

Joseph J. Burnett, mustered out with company.

William H. Barnhart, prisoner; discharged by general order June 29, 1865.

Sullivan Baker, died 1862.

J.C. Bennesholtz, killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862.

John Belford, captured; died at Andersonville, Ga., July 5, 1864.

Frederick Birch, killed at Spottsylvania C.H. May 12, 1864.

John D. Burdick; dishonorably discharged February 15, 1867, expiration of term.

Lloyd Bailey, not accounted for.

Lewis Bimber, discharged on surgeon’s certificate, date unknown.

James Conrad, mustered out with company.

Shamb’t Chambers, died February 2, 1863, near Washington, D.C.

Stephen Chambers, died March 30, 1863, near Washington, D.C.

Philemon Clark, killed at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863.

Samuel S. Clark, died, date unknown.

J. Clonay, died at Andersonville, Ga., September 22, 1864.

Thomas Clark, killed at Spottsylvania C.H., Va., May 12, 1864.

Christian Cheeks, died at Andersonville, Ga., date unknown.

Thomas A. Cox, died at Falmouth, Va., December 2, 1862.

Daniel Cochran, died, date unknown, of wounds received in action.

Henry Cope, discharged for wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va.

James Donald, discharged by general order June 24, 1865.

James Deacon, died at Andersonville, Ga., date unknown.

James R. Dye, transferred to Company A, 53d P.V., date unknown.

John J. Gorman, died at Harper’s Ferry October 20, 1862.

Charles W. Grove, died at Florence, S.C., date unknown.

William A. Goodhard, discharged on surgeon’s certificate, date unknown.

James N.G. Graham, not accounted for.

John Gunn, discharged for wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va.

William Gunn, discharged for wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va.

Leonard Horn, died at Florence, S.C., date unknown.

Henry Holliworth, died January 4, 1864, buried at Culpepper, Va.

David E. Jones, died at Andersonville, Ga., September 26, 1864.

Eli Jason, discharged for wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va.

Ransom Kendall, died December 23, 1863.

Jesse Knightlinger, died October 7, 1864, of wounds received in action.

Samuel C. King, died as a prisoner at Salisbury, N.C.

Virgil Libbey, died at Philadelphia, Pa., June 24, 1864.

Joshua Lloyd, died at Andersonville, Ga., September 20, 1864.

Morris J. Lonnen, not accounted for.

George W. Magee, absent, sick, at muster out.

Edward Mellen, discharged by general order June 24, 1865.

John Martin, discharged by general order September 8, 1865.

Brooks Minker, discharged by general order July 22, 1865.

Samuel May, died September 1, 1863.

Thomas J. Magee, died, date unknown.

William Magee, died at Charleston, S.C., date unknown.

George B. Miller, killed at Bristoe Station, Va., October 13, 1863.

Isaac Magee, not accounted for.

James L. Magill, discharged on surgeon’s certificate, 1862.

O. Willard Miller, discharged on surgeon’s certificate April, 1863.

David McKinley, mustered out with company.

Owen McClure, discharged by general order July 5, 1865.

Charles H. McCoy, not accounted for.

Sidney McKee, discharged on surgeon’s certificate October, 1862.

Samuel Parrish, discharged by general order June 29, 1865.

John M. Pearce, died June 4, 1863, of wounds received in action.

P. Quinn, captured; died at Richmond, Va., March 3, 1864.

Simeon J. Roosa, killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863.

John Rutledge, killed at Fredericksburg December 13, 1862.

George S. Richardson, transferred to 53d P.V.

C.J. Richardson, discharged for wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa.

William H. Rungan, not accounted for.

Harrison Stoddard, mustered out with company.

Byron Sutherland, discharged by general order July 1, 1865.

George W. Shay, captured; died, date unknown.

William Shreve, died December 19, 1862.

Reuben Swaggart, died January 20, 1863.

John P. Small, died at Philadelphia, Pa., August 11, 1863.

Edward Spangler, died June 19, 1864.

Walter R. Stanton, not accounted for.

John D. Stedwell, discharged for wounds received in action.

John Stewart, discharged for wounds received in action.

Jacob Smith, substitute, not accounted for.

James Thompson, mustered out with company.

Charles Thompson, killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862.

John Thompson, died November 22, 1862.

John Tuttle, killed at Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862.

Abraham L. Van Epps, mustered out with company.

Henry Van Keuren, not accounted for.

Lewis A. Van Tassel, discharged on surgeon’s certificate, date unknown.

Samuel L. Willard, mustered out with company.

Alex. C. Williams, mustered out with company.

Thomas Williams, mustered out with company.

Andrew J. Westfall, discharged by general order May 29, 1865.

William T. Westfall, discharged for wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va.

George Wheeler, discharged on surgeon’s certificate June, 1863.

William Whitman, discharged on surgeon’s certificate.

George W. Williams, discharged on surgeon’s certificate.

Hiram K. Young, captured; died at Andersonville, Ga., October 17, 1864; grave 11,040.

The foregoing roster of Company F tells a remarkable story. Thus, of the one hundred and thirteen men who belonged to it, all of whom, with a few exceptions, were mustered into service August 20, 1862, ten were killed in battle; six died of wounds received in action; fourteen died from neglect and starvation in rebel prison pens, and seventeen died of disease in United States hospitals, making a total death-roll of forty-seven. Ten were discharged by reason of wounds received in battle, and only eighteen men, good and true, were mustered out with the company.

  

* Major Titus was honorably discharged April 25, 1864.

 

SOURCE: Page(s) 214-226, History of Warren County, J.S. Schenck & W.S. Rann, Syracuse, New York: D. Mason, 1887