History of Warren County, Chapter 13

CHAPTER XIII

THE ERA OF FORMATION, EARLY SETTLEMENTS, ETC., FROM 1800 TO 1819

 

Formation of Warren County - Its Original Boundaries - Temporarily Attached to Crawford County - Crawford County Organized - Erection of Brokenstraw Township - It Becomes the First Election District of Crawford - Warren County Annexed to Venango in 1805 - Brokenstraw Still Continues as the Sole Township of Warren County - It’s Taxable Inhabitants in 1806 - Who were the First Settlers - A Mooted Question - An Order to Erect New Townships - Early Inn-Keepers - Division of the County into Two Townships - Their Names and Boundaries - Their Taxable Inhabitants in 1808 - Visited by Western Indians - A Want of Confidence - Council Held with Cornplanter - Veterans of the War of 1812 - 15 - A Transfer of Lands by the Holland Land Company - Cornplanter as He Appeared in 1816 - The Taxables of the County During the Same Year - Subsequent Rapid Increase in Population.

THE year 1800 was made memorable in the history of Pennsylvania by the erection of several new counties in the northwestern quarter of the State, from territory which had been temporarily attached to organized counties whose seat~ of justice were hundreds of miles distant. Thus, by an act of the State Legislature passed March 12, of that year, the counties of Beaver, Butler, Mercer, Crawford, Erie, Warren, Venango, and Armstrong were formed from territory previously embraced by Westmoreland, Washington, Allegheny, and Lycoming counties.* Warren was formed from Allegheny and Lycoming counties, and the clause of the act relating to its boundaries reads as follows:

"That so much of the counties of Allegheny and Lycoming, as shall be included within the following boundaries, viz.: Beginning at the southeast corner of Crawford county, in the north line of the sixth donation district; thence the course of the said line eastwardly across the Allegheny River, until it shall intersect the line dividing Johnson’s and Potter’s districts, in the county of Lycoming; thence northerly along the said line to the line of the State of New York; thence westwardly along the line of the said State to the corner of Erie county; thence southerly by the eastern boundaries of the counties of Erie and Crawford, to the place of beginning."

The same act further provided that the place for holding courts of justice within the county should be the town of Warren. Also, that the governor be empowered to appoint three commissioners to run, ascertain, and mark the boundary lines of the county; that the commissioners be paid the sum of two dollars per day while so engaged, and that the boundaries described be run "on or before the 15 day of June next." William Miles, Thomas Miles, and John Andrews, the latter, being then a resident of the county, were named in the act as commissioners for Warren county, but what their duties were, or what they did, if anything, does not appear.

It was further provided by this act that the counties of Crawford, Mercer, Venango, Warren, and Erie ("until an enumeration of the taxable inhabitants within the aforesaid counties respectively shall be made, and it shall be otherwise directed by law") should form one county under the name of Crawford county. Meadville thus became the seat of justice for a vast, sparsely settled region, and people of today can hardly realize the vicissitudes experienced by the pioneers who, when obliged to visit the county seat to transact legal or other business, or were summoned to attend courts, etc., were compelled, in going and returning, to travel from seventy-five to one hundred and fifty miles through dense forests, and along winding, partly overgrown Indian trails - providing the "trails" led in the right direction - otherwise the undertaking was still more hazardous.

Only a few weeks, had passed after the passage of the above-mentioned act ere the county of Crawford was duly organized as a separate division of the State, and its first officers installed in office. The first session of court was held in the upper story of William Dick’s residence, on the northeast corner of Water street and Cherry Alley in Meadville The record of this session begins as follows: "At a Court of Common Pleas held and kept at Meadville, for the county of Crawford, the seventh day of July, Anno Domini, One thousand eight hundred, before David Mead and John Kelso, Judges present, and from thence continued by adjournment until the ninth day of the same month inclusive." Mead and Kelso were only associate judges, and not learned in the law. Their attention at this time was chiefly directed to the admission of attorneys, to the erection of townships, the issuing of licenses, and the appointing of certain township officers.

During the second session of the court of Crawford county, held at the place above described in October, 1800, Hon. Alexander Addison presiding, the first grand jury met. It was during this term, also, that the township of Brokenstraw (the original township of Warren county) was erected. The order of court respecting this subdivision reads as follows: "In pursuance to sundry petitions presented, the court directed the following Townships to be laid off."

"Also all that part of Warren County situate west of River Allegheny and Conawango Creek be erected into a township and the name thereof to be Brokenstraw." (See Docket No. 1, page 11, Judicial Records of Crawford County.) Judge Addison resided at Pittsburgh, and was a gentleman possessed of a fine mind and great attainments, but he was subsequently impeached and removed from office, because of his absolute refusal to allow an associate judge to charge a jury after his own charge had been delivered.

On the 21st of February, 1801, another act was passed relating to the new county of Warren, by the provisions of which it was denominated the First Election District of Crawford County, and the electors residing therein were directed to hold their general elections at the house of Robert Andrews, who then lived in the Brokenstraw valley, or where Pittsfield now stands.

This arrangement continued until April 1, 1805, when an act was passed providing for the organization of Venango county from and after September 1 of that year. By the same legislative act Warren county was detached from Crawford and annexed to Venango for judicial and all other purposes of government; thus becoming part of the Sixth Judicial District, of which the Hon. Jesse Moore was then serving as president judge.

Venango county was duly organized in the fall of 1805, and the first term of court was held at Franklin, in December of that year. During the following year the first assessment rolls for the newly organized county were completed. Those rolls have been carefully preserved (as seems not to have been the case with early papers of the same class in Crawford county), and from them we have obtained the most complete and authentic list of the original pioneers of Warren county now available, and now published for the first time. Brokenstraw was still the only township in Warren county, and its taxable inhabitants in 1806, together with the amount and kind of taxable property owned by each, were as follows:

Addison,** Alexander, 2 outlots in Warren.

Arthur, John, 170 acres land, 1 cow, 4 oxen and ½ of saw-mill.

Armstrong, George, 2 outlots and 2 inlots in Warren.

Andrews, Robert, 900 acres land, 2 horses, 3 cows, 1 saw-mill and 2 inlots in Warren.

Adams, William, 400 acres land, 1 horse.

Andrews, James, single man, 1 inlot in Warren.

Andrews, John, 600 acres land, 4 horses, 2 cows, 4 inlots and 1 outlot in Warren.

Arthur, William, 70 acres land, 1 cow, 1 horse, 1 inlot in Warren.

Arthur, Robert, single man, 2 outlots in Warren.

Anderson, Samuel, 150 acres, 1 cow. Baldwin, Jonathan, single man, 400 acres land, 1 cow.

Brown, John, 400 acres land, 1 cow, 2 horses. Brown, James, single man, 100 acres land, 1 cow.

Barr, John, 100 acres land, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Budd, Benjamin, single man.

Biles, Charles, 400 acres land, 1 cow.

Buchanan, Andrew, 1 cow.

Bonner, Robert, 400 acres land, 1 cow, 1 grist-mill.

Banjer, Mathew, 134 acres land.

Bell, John, 400 acres land, 1 cow, 1 horse.

Bell, Mary, 100 acres land.

Bell, Robert, 1 cow, single man.

Cole, Benjamin, 100 acres land, 1 cow.

Culbertson, James, 400 acres land.

Crawford, John, 1 cow.

Chamberlain, Stout, 200 acres land, 1 cow, 1 horse.

Coneway, George, 400 acres land.

Carpenter, William, 100 acres land, 2 horses, 2 cows.

Carpenter, John, single man, 1 horse.

Cochran, William, 1 cow, 1 horse.

Culbertson, James, Jr., 250 acres land, 1 cow, 2 oxen, 2 inlots in Warren.

Corbett, Daniel, 250 acres land, 1 horse, 1 cow, 1 inlot in Warren.

Corbett, William, 1 inlot in Warren.

Corbett, Isaac, 1 inlot in Warren.

Call, Daniel, 200 acres land, 2 cows, 1 horse, 2 oxen.

Call, Dennis, 200 acres land, 1 cow.

Cunningham, Richard, single man, 400 acres land.

Carr, David, 200 acres land at mouth of the Brokenstraw.

Craig, Isaac, 1,080 acres land.

Davis, Elijah, 100 acres land, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Davis, Abraham, single man, 100 acres land, 1 ox.

Davis, John, 100 acres land.

Dougherty, Charles, single man.

Dickson, John, 100 acres land, 1 cow, 1 horse.

Davis, William, 150 acres land, 1 cow, 2 horses.

Davis, Thomas, 150 acres land.

Eagan, William, 700 acres land, 1 horse, 2 oxen, 1 inlot in Warren.

Eddy, Zachariah, 400 acres land, 2 cows, 2 oxen, 1 inlot in Warren.

Evers, Andrew, 200 acres land, 2 oxen.

Evans, William, single man.

Elder James, 400 acres land, 1 horse, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Elder, John, 400 acres land, 1 cow, single man.

Ford, Samuel, 400 acres land, single man.

Felton, John, 100 acres land.

Ford, William, single man, 400 acres land, 1 horse, 1 inlot in Warren.

Foster, William B., single man, 1 horse.

Frampton, John, 50 acres land, 1cow.

Frampton, Nathaniel, 100 acres land, 1 horse, 1cow.

Ford, John, 100 acres land, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Frew, Hugh, 200 acres land, 3 cows.

Fenton, George W., single man.

Gray, Joseph, 400 acres land, 1 cow, 1 horse, 2 inlots in Warren, 550 acres "up the Creek."

Groves, Thomas W., 200 acres land, 2 cows.

Granger, Eli, single man.

Gibson, Samuel, 400 acres land, 1 inlot in Warren.

Gibson, Gideon, 2 cows, 2 oxen, 2 inlots in Warren.

Gilson, John, 2 cows, I horse, 2 oxen, 2 inlots in Warren.

Gibson, Erastus, 2 inlots in Warren.

Gibson, Jacob, 400 acres land, 3 cows, 2 oxen.

Grippin, William, single man.

Goodwin, Joseph, single man, 1 cow.

Huffman, Philip, 400 acres land, 2 cows, 2 horses.

Hildebrandt, George, 400 acres land, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Hildebrandt, George, Jr., 400 acres land.

Hildebrandt, Solomon, 400 acres land.

Hicks, John, 400 acres land, 2 cows.

Hicks, Levi, 400 acres land, 2 cows, 1 horse.

Hicks, Gershom, 1 cow.

Hare, Michael, 100 acres land, 1 cow.

Hare, James, 100 acres land.

Hunter, Robert, 400 acres land, I cow, 2 oxen.

Henderson, Richard, 400 acres land, 1 cow.

Henry, William, single man.

Hunter, Garrett, 400 acres land.

Huffman, Jacob. 100 acres land, 2 cows, 1 horse.

Houghy, John, 400 acres land.

Hood, John, 100 acres land, 2 cows, 1 horse.

Irvine, Callender, 800 acres land east of the Allegheny River, 200 acres land opposite Warren.

Irvin, James, 400 acres land, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Jackson, Daniel, 130 acres land, 2 cows, 1 horse, 2 oxen, 2 inlots in Warren, 1 saw-mill.

Jackson, Daniel, Jr., 400 acres land, 2 cows, 1 inlot in Warren.

Jackson, Ethan, 200 acres land, 2 cows, 2 oxen, 1 horse, 2 inlots in Warren.

Jackson, Elijah, 150 acres land, 2 cows.

Jones, Isaiah, 329 acres land, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Jones, Daniel, 3 cows, 1 inlot in Warren.

Justice, James, 250 acres land, 2 cows, 1 horse.

Justice, John, 2 oxen.

Jones, Edward, single man.

Jobes, Samuel, single man, 1 horse.

Kennedy, Thomas R., 5 outlots in Warren.

Linn, James, 100 acres land, 1 cow, 1 horse.

Long, George, 400 acres land, 1 cow, 1 horse, 2 oxen, 1 saw-mill.

Long, John, single man.

Long, John, Sentr., 200 acres land.

Lapsley, William, 400 acres land, 1 cow, 1 horse.

Lynch, George, 1 cow.

Miller, John, single man, 100 acres land.

McKinney, Michael, 200 acres land, 2 cows,

Marsh, Mulford, 400 acres land, 1 cow, 2 oxen, McGinty, Daniel, 400 acres land.

Morrison, Jeremiah, 133 acres land, 2 cows, 2 oxen, 1/3 pt. saw-mill; 1 inlot in Warren.

Morrison, Samuel, 133 acres land, 2 oxen, 1/3 part saw-mill, 1 inlot in Warren.

Morrison, James, 183 acres land, 2 cows, 2 oxen, 1/3 part saw-mill.

Morrison, John, 400 acres land, 2 Cows, 1 horse, 2 inlots in Warren.

Morrison, James, Sent, 4 oxen, 3 cows.

Morrison, William, single man, 2 inlots in Warren.

Morrison, Ephraim, single man, 1 inlot in Warren.

Murdock, Abijah, 11 inlots and 6 outlots in Warren, single man.

McClain, Neil, 200 acres land, 2 oxen, 2 cows.

McClain, John, 150 acres land.

Murdock, Galen, 100 acres land, 2 cows, 1 horse.

Murdock, Moses, 100 acres land, 2 cows.

Miles, Robert, 1650 acres land, 2 cows, 2 horses.

McClay, Charles, 150 acres land.

Marsh, John, 800 acres land, 1 cow, 2 oxen, 1 outlot and 4 inlots in Warren.

Marsh, Hugh, 500 acres land, 2 cows, 2 oxen, 1 horse, 3 outlots and 2 inlots in Warren.

Mead, Darius, 300 acres land, 2 oxen, 3 Cows, 1 saw-mill, 1/2 grist-mill.

Mead, Joseph, 400 acres land, 3 cows, 1 horse, 2 oxen, 1 saw-mill, 1/2 grist-mill, 2 inlots in Warren.

McQuay, Daniel, 400 acres land, 2 oxen.

McNair, Charles, single man, 200 acres land, 1 horse.

Murphy, Jesse, 200 acres land, 1 cow.

Maxwell, William, 400 acres land, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

McCue, Daniel, 100 acres land.

Morrison, Hugh, 400 acres land, 1 horse, 1 cow.

McGuire, Hugh, 400 acres land, 1 cow, 1 horse.

McClain, William, 100 acres land, 2 cows, 2 horses.

McDowell, Alexander, 9 outlots and 4 inlots in Warren, 11 acres Reserve.

McKinney, Barnabas, 100 acres, 1 cow, 1 horse, 2 oxen, 1/4 saw-mill.

McKinney, John, 500 acres land, 2 oxen, 2 inlots in Warren.

Miner, Allen S., single man.

Neville, John, 400 acres land.

Olds, Gilbert, 100 acres of land, 1 "stear," 1 horse.

Peelman, Christopher, single man, 100 acres land, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Peelman, John, 100 acres land.

Prosser, Daniel Senr., single man, 1 cow, 1 horse.

Prosser, William, 100 acres land.

Prosser, Daniel Jr., 100 acres land.

Prosser, Isaac, 100 acres land.

Putnam, Michael, 133 acres land.

Putnam, Nathaniel, 133 acres land.

Portman,*** John, 800 acres land, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Ross, Stephen, 400 acres land, 1 cow, 1 horse, 1/2 saw-mill.

Reese, Martin, 2 cows, 1 horse, 2 oxen, 117 acres Reserve lands, 1 inlot in Warren.

Reese, Martin, Jr., single man, one horse.

Rogers, James, single man, one horse.

Russell, John, 200 acres land, 3 cows, 2 oxen.

Russell, Thomas, single man, 100 acres, 1 cow.

Russell, Robert, 100 acres land, 1 cow, 2 oxen, 1 inlot in Warren.

Robertson, Jonathan, 200 acres land, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Rinard, Isaac, 400 acres land, 2 cows, 2 horses.

Stuart, John, 100 acres land, 1 cow.

Stuart, James, 200 acres land, 1 horse.

Stuart, William, single man, 100 acres land.

Shelletto, Edward, 400 acres land, 1 cow.

Shipman, James, 100 acres land, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Stiles, John, 400 acres land, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Stage, Samuel, 50 acres land, 3 inlots and 2 outlots in Warren.

Slone, George, 400 acres land, 3 cows.

Smith, John, single man.

Swar, Jacob, 2 inlots in Warren.

Simon, T.G.V., 200 acres land, 1 cow, 2 horses.

Stewart, James, single man.

Sims, James, single man, 400 acres land, 1 inlot in Warren.

Shearer, Joseph, single man, 1 horse.

Sims, William, 150 acres land, 1 cow, 2 horses, 1 inlot in Warren.

Spitler, William, 2 horses, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Sample, John, 1 cow.

Stearns, Ellesus, 200 acres land.

Sample, John, Jr., 150 acres land; 1 horse, 2 cows.

Stewart, Richard, 100 acres land, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Smith, Charles, 400 acres land, 1 cow.

Tyler, Joel, single man, 200 acres land, 1 cow.

Thompson, Aaron, 400 acres land, 1 cow, 1 horse.

Thompson, Daniel, 400 acres land, 1 horse.

Thompson, Alexander, 50 acres land.

Talmage, Levi, single man.

Welch, Samuel, 800 acres land, 2 cows, 2 horses, 2 oxen.

Winton, David, single man, 200 acres land.

Watts, John, Jr., single man, 150 acres land, 1 ox.

Wilson, Hugh, 300 acres land, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

White, Alfred, 100 acres land, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Wilson, William, 600 acres land, 1 horse, 2 oxen, 2 cows, 2 inlots in Warren.

Wilson, James, 200 acres.

White, Giles, 100 acres land, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Wales, Moses, 400 acres land, 2 oxen.

Wilson, Samuel, 400 acres land, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Wright, Isaiah, single man, 1 horse, 3 inlots in Warren.

Woods, John, 400 acres land.

Watts, Alexander, single man, 200 acres land.

Watts, James, single man, 300 acres land.

Watts, John, 200 acres land, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Waldo, Frederick, 400 acres land, 2 cows.

Young, John, 2 inlots in Warren.

York, Amos, 100 acres land, 2 cows.

Young, Mathew, single man, 400 acres land.

Young, Christopher, 400 acres land, 2 horses, single man.

The assessor for that year was Hugh Marsh, and the total amount of the tax levied upon the taxable property in the township, or county rather, was $441.12 1/2.

Here, then, are shown the names of two hundred and six of the earliest residents of Warren county, the representatives of a population of nearly one thousand people, or a much greater number than has heretofore been supposed to have existed here at that time. But to determine who among them was the first settler, or the first dozen families to settle in the county, is an impracticable task. It is probable, however, that if it should be asserted that the Andrews, Arthur, Brown, Bonner, Corbett, Call, Davis, Evers, Elder, Frampton, Frew, Gray, Gibson, Gilson, Huffman, Hildebrandt, Hicks, Hare, Irvin, Jackson, Jones, Long, McQuay, Marsh, Morrison, Miles, Mead, McKinney, McDowell, Prosser, Reese, Russell, Stewart, Slone, Sample, Thompson, Welch, Watts, Wilson, and Young families were among the very first, and that they became residents here during the years from 1797 to 1802, the assertion would not be far from being correct.

It has been claimed that settlements were made in Pine Grove and Columbus townships prior to 1795, but from facts already set forth in previous chapters, viz.: that the Indians, including Cornplanter’s band, were hostile until 1795; that the British did not evacuate forts on the American side of the line until the following year; that this immediate region offered no special inducements for settlement over others situated in less dangerous localities; that this territory had not then been surveyed and legally opened to settlements, and that so far as authentically known no settlements existed in all this part of the State prior to 1795, other than those at the mouth of French Creek, and at Meadville, and those composing these settlements were glad to seek the protection of Forts Franklin and Le Boeuf until long after Wayne’s victory - we do not believe that any permanent settlements were effected in Warren county until about 1796 - 97. True, a block-house had been erected at Warren about 1795, but this was intended for the storage of supplies, etc., sent here for the use of those engaged in surveying the lands of the Holland Company, and when their work was completed, or when winter came on, it is but natural to presume that these men returned to their homes. However, for more detailed accounts of early settlements the reader is referred to township histories, and the personal sketches to be found in other pages of this work.

At the June term, 1806, of the Court of Common Pleas and Quarter Sessions, held at Franklin by the Hon. Jesse Moore and his associates, Samuel Dale, John Andrews, and Thomas Beard were appointed by the court as commissioners to lay off the county of Venango and the territory annexed to it "into convenient districts for townships." Dale and Beard resided in Venango, and Andrews in Warren county. Their report was not rendered until nearly two years afterward. It will be referred to, however, in its proper place.

In December of the same year Daniel Jackson, of the town of Warren, and Giles White, of Brokenstraw township, were recommended to the governor by the court as suitable persons to keep houses of public entertainment. One year later Salmon Fuller, a millwright, was licensed to keep a public house in Conewango township. These were the first persons licensed to "keep tavern" in Warren county of whom we have authentic knowledge.

It seems that a division of the county into two townships had been accomplished as early as June, 1807, for we find Daniel Jackson and Joseph Gray then mentioned as the constables respectively of Conewango and Brokenstraw townships, but the announcement had not yet been made by court; hence the names of the taxable inhabitants for that year were all shown upon the lists made out for Brokenstraw township.

The names appearing upon the rolls in 1807, for the first time, were those of Benjamin August, a tailor, James Alden, Thomas Bell, James Bonner, Andrew Clark; John Carpenter, jr., Joseph Cole, James Cole, George Carpenter, owner of one-half of saw-mill, James Dosser, Samuel Fancher, John Garner, Daniel Horn, John Hines, Cornelius McCue, James McLister, a shoemaker, Robert McNamara, Humphrey Miller, William Mead, Joseph Page, Charles. Smith, Ezra Tillotson, Nathan Winton, and Joseph Watts.

At March sessions, 1808, of the Court of Common Pleas, etc., held at Franklin, the report of the commissioners appointed in 1806 to lay out townships in the counties of Venango and Warren was acted upon, and so far as it related to the two Warren county townships, was promptly approved. The boundaries of these townships were then described as. follows:

"Beginning at the South East corner of Warren County, thence by the line thereof west to the west boundary of a Tract of land surveyed to the Holland Land Company on Warrant No. 3194, thence north to the Allegheny river, thence down the same to the West end of the Reserve of Warren, thence by the same to the north west corner, thence in a northerly direction to the south east corner of a tract surveyed on warrant in the name of George Lex, thence north to the line dividing the tracts surveyed, on warrants in the name of Caleb and Paul Cato, thence west to the line dividing the tracts surveyed on warrants-in the name of Stephen and Simon Nim, thence north to the northern boundary of said county, thence East by the same to the Eastern boundary, thence south by the same to the place of beginning, to be called Conewango Township."

"Beginning at the north west corner of Conewango township, thence by the line of Warren County west to the western boundary of said county, thence by the same south to the southern boundary thereof, thence by the same East to the south west corner of Conewango township aforesaid, thence by the same to the place of beginning, to be called Brokenstraw Township."

This division, as will be noticed, placed the jurisdiction of the eastern part of the county under Conewango township, and the western part under that of Brokenstraw. The rolls for that year (1808) show that Conewango township then contained one hundred and thirty-nine taxable inhabitants, and Brokenstraw one hundred and seventeen - a gain of fifty in two years. Their names, etc., were as follows:

Conewango:

Andrews, John, 1 outlot and 6 inlots in Warren.

Andrews, Robert, 2 inlots in Warren.

Andrews, James, 1 inlot in Warren.

Armstrong, George, 2 outlots and 2 inlots in Warren.

Addison, Alexander (decd.), 2 outlots, 2 inlots in Warren.

Allen, Hugh, 3 inlots in Warren.

Arthur, Robt., 1 cow.

Arthur, James, 1 horse.

Arthur, William, 110 acres, 1 horse.

Baldwin, Henry, 43 inlots in Warren.

Butler, Samuel, 2 inlots in Warren.

Barr, John, 100 acres, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Brown, John, Senr., 300 acres, 1 cow.

Brown, John, Jr., 1 cow.

Brown, James, 100 acres.

Brown, David, 200 acres, 2 horses, 1 cow, 2 oxen, 2 inlots in Warren.

Budd, Benjamin.

Baird, James, 200 acres, 2 oxen.

Baird, Edward, 1 cow.

Biles, Charles, 400 acres, 2 oxen.

Clemons, Jacob, 12 inlots in Warren.

Corbett, Daniel, 3 inlots in Warren.

Cole, John, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Cole, Benjamin, 100 acres, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Colt & Marlin, 400 acres, 1 saw-mill, 2 oxen, 2 cows.

Cole, Cornelius, 100 acres, 2 horses, 3 cows.

Craig, Isaac, 1,688 acres.

Campbell, John, single man.

Campbell, Samuel, 2 horses, 1 cow.

Cheeks, Nathaniel, 1,000 acres, 1 cow, 1 ox.

Dickson, John, one inlot in Warren.

Dougherty, Charles, 3 inlots in Warren.

Davis, William, 2 inlots in Warren.

Dike, Isaac, 2 inlots in Warren.

Dale, Samuel, 1 inlot in Warren.

Davis, William, 150 acres, 2 horses, 2 cows.

Davis, Thomas, 150 acres.

Egan, William, 400 acres, 1 horse, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Eddy, Zachariah, 400 acres, 1 horse, 1 cow, 2 oxen, 2 inlots in Warren, asssesor for 1808.

Ford, William, 5 inlots in Warren.

Foster, William B., 4 inlots in Warren.

Frew, Hugh, 200 acres, 2 cows, 2 oxen, 1 grist-mill.

Fuller, Salmon, 2 cows, 1 horse, 141 inlots in Warren, millwright by occupation.

Graff, Andrew, 4 inlots in Warren.

Goodwin, Jacob, 600 acres, 2 horses, 2 cows, 2 oxen, 2 inlots in Warren, 3 saw-mill.

Greenwalt, Mathias, 1 cow, 1 ox.

Gray, Joseph, 2 inlots in Warren.

Geer, Asa, 2 cows.

Goodwin, Joseph. 125 acres.

Hurst, Henry, 2 inlots in Warren.

Hill & Torbett, 10 inlots in Warren.

Hackney, Joseph, 6 inlots in Warren.

Harper, Elisha, 2 inlots in Warren.

Hood, John, 100 acres of land, 1 horse.

Hadley, Stephen, 66 acres, 3 saw-mill.

Hawley, John, 150 acres.

Jones, Isaiah, Esq., 329 acres, 1 cow, justice of the peace.

Jackson, Daniel, Senr., 133 acres, 2 horses, 4 cows, 8 lots in Warren, 1 saw-mill, justice of the peace.

Jackson, Daniel, Jr., 400 acres, 1 horse, 1 cow, 1 inlot in Warren.

Jackson, Ethan, 470 acres, 2 cows, 2 oxen, 2 inlots in Warren, 3 saw-mill.

Kennedy, Thomas R., 6 outlots in Warren.

King, John, single man.

Kerson, John, 200 acres, 1 cow.

Kerson, Samuel, 1 cow.

Lynch, George, 1 cow.

Lapsley, William, 200 acres, 2 cows.

McKinney, Michael, 400 acres, 1 horse, 2 cows, 1 ox.

McDowell, Alexander, 3 outlots and 6 inlots in Warren.

McNamara, Robert, 1 outlot and 12 inlots in Warren.

McNair, Charles, 2 inlots in Warren.

McKinney, John, 2 inlots in Warren

Murdock, Abijah, 100 acres, 1 Cow, 4 oxen, 1 saw-mill, 18 inlots in Warren.

Murdock, Moses, acres, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Murdock, Galen, 1 cow.

Marsh, John, 200 acres, 1 horse, 3 cows, 4 oxen, 2 outlots and 2 inlots in Warren.

Marsh, David, 100 acres, 1 cow, 1 horse, 1 inlot in Warren.

Marsh, Mulford, 400 acres, 4 cows, 3 oxen, 2 outlots and 6 inlots in Warren.

Morrison, Samuel, 133 acres, 1 cow, 2 oxen, 2 inlots in Warren, 2/3 of saw-mill

Miles, Robert, 1,400 acres, 2 horses, 3 cows, 2 oxen.

McClay, Charles, 1,200 acres, 6 inlots in Warren.

Miles, William, 200 acres.

Marsh, Hugh, 400 acres, 1 horse, 2 cows, 4 oxen, 1 bull, 2 outlots and 3 inlots in Warren.

McGinty, Daniel, 100 acres, 1 cow, 1/2 sawmill.

McClain, Neal, 200 acres, 2 horses, 2 cows.

McClain, John; 200 acres, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Mullen, John, 3 inlots in Warren.

Morrison, John, 400 acres, 2 cows, 2 inlots in Warren.

Morrison, Jeremiah, 400 acres, 1 cow, 4 oxen, 1 inlot in Warren, 2/3 saw-mill.

Morrison, James, Jr., 65 acres, 1 cow, 2 oxen, 1 inlot in Warren.

Morrison, James, Senr., 2 cows, 2 oxen. Morrison, William, 200 acres, 1 cow, 2 oxen, 1 inlot in Warren.

Murphy, Jesse, 200 acres, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Neville, John, 1 cow.

Owen, John, 1 cow.

Powers, George, 38 inlots in Warren.

Pastorius, William, 1 inlot in Warren.

Parmlee, Lothrop S., single man.

Phillips, Ira, 66 acres, 1/3 saw-mill.

Peelman, Christopher, 100 acres, 1 horse.

Portman, John, 100 acres, 3 cows.

Portman, James, 100 acres.

Reed, James, 1 inlot in Warren.

Russell, Thomas, 100 acres.

Russell, Robert, 100 acres, 1 cow, 1 inlot in Warren, millwright by occupation.

Russell, John, Senr., 100 acres, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Russell, John, Jr., 100 acres, 2 oxen.

Ross, Stephen, 400 acres, 2 horses, 2 cows, 2 oxen, 1 saw-mill, 1 inlot in Warren.

Robertson, Jonathan, 275 acres, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Reilly, James, 1 inlot in Warren.

Rason, Jacob, 2 inlots in Warren.

Reese, Martin, Senr., 1 horse, 2 cows, 2 oxen, 7 outlots and 1 inlot in Warren.

Reese, Martin, Jr., 117 acres, 2 oxen.

Reese, John, 2 inlots in Warren.

Ramsey, Robert, 100 acres, 1 cow.

Swar, Jacob, 2 inlots in Warren.

Sherman, Elisha, 1 inlot in Warren.

Stiles, John, 375 acres, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Stewart, William, 100 acres, 1 horse.

Slone, George, 2 cows, a blacksmith.

Shipman, James, 100 acres, 1 cow.

Stuart, James, 200 acres, 2 cows.

Stuart, John, 100 acres, 1 cow.

Smith, John, 4 inlots in Warren.

Sims, William, Jr., 1 inlot in Warren.

Simons, Titus A., 1 inlot in Warren.

Simons, David S., 1 inlot in Warren.

Stage, Samuel, 300 acres, 2 horses, 1 inlot in Warren.

Schoonover, Christopher, 400 acres, 1 horse, 2 cows.

Thompson John, 3 inlots in Warren.

Tyler Joel, 200 acres, 1 cow.

Uppenhouser, Hendrick, 1 horse.

Wright, Azariah, 4 inlots in Warren.

Work, Edward, 4 inlots in Warren.

Wilson, Hugh, 1 inlot in Warren.

Woodworth, Joseph, 200 acres, 2 oxen.

Woodworth, Isaac, 200 acres.

Waldo, Frederick, 200 acres, 2 cows.

Young, Jotham, single man.

York, Amos, 100 acres, 2 cows.

Single men were taxed 75 cents each. The rate per cent. on real and personal estate was six mills on the dollar.

The total amount of valuation was $75,140.80 1/2, and the court of appeals was ordered to be held at the house of Daniel Jackson.

Brokenstraw:

August, Benjamin, tailor, 1 cow.

Andrews, James. 100 acres.

Andres, Robert, 300 acres, 2 horses, 2 cows, 1 saw-mill and justice of the peace.

Andrews, John, 600 acres, 2 oxen, 1 horse, 4 cows, 2 stills.

Arthur, John, 150 acres, 1/2 saw-mill, 2 oxen, 2 cows.

Adams, William, 100 acres, 2 horses.

Adkins, James, 1 horse, single man. Buchanan, Andrew, blacksmith, 100 acres, 2 oxen, 2 cows.

Bonner, Robert, 400 acres, 1 grist-mill, 1 saw-mill, 1 cow, 1 horse.

Berry, George, 100 acres.

Bell, Robert, single man, 1 yoke oxen.

Bell, John, 500 acres.

Bonner, Francis, single man, millwright.

Bonner, James, single man.

Chamberlain, Stout, 250 acres.

Campbell, James, 1 horse.

Campbell, Samuel, 1 horse, 1 cow.

Crawford, John, 200 acres, 2 oxen.

Culbertson, James, 450 acres, 1 saw-mill, 2 oxen, 2 cows, 1 horse.

Cover, George, single man, 1 horse. Corbett, Daniel, 350 acres, 1 saw-mill, 2 yokes oxen, 2 horses, 1 cow.

Call, Daniel, 200 acres, 2 oxen, 1 Cow.

Call, Dennis, 150 acres.

Call, John, 150 acres.

Cochran, William, 2 oxen, 1 cow.

Carpenter, William, Senr., 250 acres, 2 cows, 1 horse.

Carpenter, John, 150 acres, 1 saw-mill, 2 oxen, 1 horse.

Carhart, Stophel, single man.

Cunningham, Richard, 200 acres.

Collins, Jonathan, 100 acres, 1 Cow.

Davis, Elijah, 100 acres, 2 oxen, 1 cow.

Davis, John, 100 acres.

Davis, Abraham, 100o acres, 2 oxen.

Evers, Andrew, 200 acres, 2 oxen, 1 cow, 1 horse.

Elder, James, Jr., 1 horse, 1 cow.

Elder, John, 100 acres.

Frampton, John, 250 acres, 2 oxen, 3 cows, 1 horse.

Ford, William, 200 acres, 1 ox, 1 cow.

Fancher, Samuel, 100 acres, 1 horse, 1 cow.

Ford, Obediah, single man.

Groves, Thos. W., 400 acres, 2 oxen, 1 cow.

Gray, Joseph, 600 acres, 2 horses, 2 cows, 2 oxen.

Green, James, 2 oxen, 1 cow.

Hare, James, 100 acres.

Hare, Michael, 100 acres, 1 cow.

Henry, William, cabinet maker, 1 cow.

Huffman, Jacob, 200 acres, 4 oxen, 1 horse, 1 cow.

Henderson, Richard, 400 acres, 2 oxen.

Hunter, Robert, 4 acres, 1 cow.

Hinds, John, blacksmith, 400 acres, 2 oxen.

Hildebrandt, George, Jr., 100 acres.

Hildebrandt, Solomon, 100 acres.

Hildebrandt, George, Sent, 100 acres, 2 oxen, 1 cow, millwright by trade.

Hicks, Levi, 100 acres, 2 cows, 1 ox, 1 horse.

Hicks, John, 100 acres, 2 horses, 1 ox, 1 cow.

Horn, Daniel, 100 acres, 1 horse.

Huffman, Philip, 395 acres, 3 horses, 1 cow.

Justice, John, 1 horse, 2 oxen.

Justice, James, 200 acres, 1 cow.

Irvin, James, 200 acres, 2 horses, 2 cows.

Irvin, George, 100 acres.

Jackson, Elijah, 100 acres, 2 oxen, 1 horse.

Jones, Daniel, 100 acres, 2 cows.

Jones, Edward, single man.

Long, John, Jr, 200 acres, 1 cow, 2 oxen.

Long, John, Senr, 160 acres.

Cover & Horn, 400 acres, 1 saw-mill.

Long, George, 2 oxen, 1 horse, 1 cow.

Linn, James, 100 acres, 1 horse, 1 cow.

McQuay, Daniel, 400 acres, 2 oxen.

Miller, Humphrey, 2 cows, 1 horse.

McKinney, Barnabas, 4 oxen.

NcNair, Charles, 700 acres.

Maxwell, William, 400 acres, 1 horse, 2 cows.

Mead, Joseph, 400 acres, 4 oxen, 3 cows, 1 horse, 1 saw-mill.

Mead, Darius, 500 acres, 1 grist-mill, 1 sawmill, 6 oxen, 3 cows, 2 horses.

McClain, William, 100 acres, 2 horses, 2 cows.

McGuire, Patience, 400 acres, 2 oxen, 2 cows.

Miller, John, 100 acres, 1 horse, 1 cow.

McGahan, William, 2 oxen, 1 cow.

McKinney, John, 200 acres, 3 oxen, 2 horses, 3 cows, 1 saw-mill.

Mead, William, 100 acres, 1 horse.

McLister, James, shoemaker, 100 acres, 2 cows.

McCullough, Robert, single man.

Mead, John, single man.

Olds, Gilbert, shoemaker.

Prosser, William, 100 acres, 2 oxen, 1 cow.

Prosser, Daniel, 100 acres.

Prosser, Isaac, 100 acres.

Putnam, Nathaniel, 266 acres, 2 oxen, 1 cow, 1 horse, 2/3 of saw-mill.

Porter, Andrew, 100 acres.

Page, Joseph, 100 acres, 1 cow.

Rhinehart, Isaac, 100 acres, 3 cows, 1 horse.

Sims, James, 400 acres.

Sims, Catharine, 2 oxen, 2 cows, 1 horse.

Sample, John, 150 acres, 2 horses, 1 cow.

Siggins, William, 1 yoke of oxen.

Sample, John, Senr., 1 cow.

Smith, Charles, 100 acres, 1 cow.

Stewart, Richard, 100 acres.

Tuthill, Francis, 200 acres, 1 cow.

Thompson, Daniel, 100 acres, 2 horses.

Thompson, Thomas, single man.

Wilson, Samuel, 400 acres, 2 oxen, 1 cow.

Wilson, William, 400 acres.

Watts, James, 300 acres, 2 oxen, 1 horse.

Watts, Alexander, 500 acres.

Winton, Nathan, 2 oxen, 2 cows.

Winton, David, 133 acres, 2 oxen, 1/3 saw-mill.

White, Alfred, 100 acres, 3 cows.

White, Giles, 100 acres, 4 oxen, 3 cows, 2 horses.

Watts, John, 100 acres, 1 horse, 1 cow.

Williams, John L., 50 acres.

Willison, James, 100 acres, 1 cow.

Welch, Samuel, 500 acres, 3 horses, 2 cows.

Wilson, Hugh, 300 acres, 1 cow, 1 horse.

Young, Mathew, 400 acres, 1 saw-mill.

Hugh Wilson was the assessor. The tax upon single men and the rate per cent. upon real and personal estate were the same as in Conewango township. The total valuation of taxable property in the township was $58,766.99, and the house of Robert Andrews was named as the place for holding a court of appeals.

In June, 1808, a delegation of Wyandot and Seneca Indians from Sandusky River passed through Warren and up the Allegheny River, on their way to a council with the Seneca nation. They were bringing a friendly message from the Ohio tribes, to allay any fears of an Indian outbreak in that locality. During the same summer some twenty or thirty Senecas, from their reservation on the Allegheny, went to Sandusky, where a council was held with the Western tribes. They also passed over the same route going and returning, and it was learned that the council’s deliberations related principally to the existing differences between the United States and England, and in the event of a war they had decided to observe a strict neutrality. This decision, however, proved of very little stability, as the Senecas sided with the United States, while most of the Western Indians, through the influence of Tecumseh, assisted by British gold, went with England.

When the War of 1812 - 15 broke out, a want of confidence began to be manifested between the inhabitants of Northwestern Pennsylvania and the Indians on the Allegheny River, which excited some uneasiness, lest disagreeable consequences might result from it. To quiet all apprehensions, the citizens of Meadville held a meeting, and deputized General David Mead, Colonel Joseph Hackney (afterwards for many years a well-known citizen of Warren), and Major Patrick Farrelly to visit the Indians and ascertain their disposition in the coming war with England; also to make what explanations might be deemed necessary to continue the good understanding that had hitherto existed with these tribes. A council was held at Jennesadaga, Cornplanter’s village on the Allegheny, at which were present a number of chiefs and warriors of the Seneca nation, among whom were Cornplanter, Silver Heels - the old prophet, who, it has been stated, was a brother of Cornplanter - Joseph Beads, John Purfer, Major Henry O’Bail and Charles O’Bail, Sons of Cornplanter. When the council assembled Cornplanter welcomed the delegates and wished to hear from them. Major Farrelly explained the object of their mission, viz., to preserve the peace and friendship heretofore existing between the whites and Indians. After a short consultation with the other chiefs Cornplanter replied, reciprocating the sentiments expressed by Major Farrelly, whereupon the council broke up with the best of feelings.

At this period a treaty existed between the Senecas and the United States government which provided that if a white man should kill an Indian, or vice versa, the culprit would have to pay $200 to the friends or heirs of the murdered man. Though this might now be regarded as very questionable justice, yet it helped to establish a feeling of confidence among the Senecas, which made them the allies of this nation in the War of 1812 - 15, though every effort was made by the agents of the British government to seduce them from their allegiance to the American cause. To Cornplanter’s influence was due this happy result, as after the Revolutionary War (with the exception of the year 1794) he was always the steadfast friend of the young republic in her struggle against English arrogance, which was exhibited on every occasion, until the War of 1812 - 15 taught her to respect the rights of American freemen. Cornplanter, then an old man of about four score years, took no active part in that war, but many of the Senecas, including his son, Major Henry O’Bail, and his half-brother, Half-Town, were conspicuous in the last struggle against English tyranny.

Of the white residents of Warren county who served in the last war(4*) against Great Britain but little can be said, since it is an impracticable matter to ascertain who they were, how many there were, or where they served. But there is no room for doubt that the two townships furnished their full quota of soldiers and that the men who marched to the scene of conflict well performed the duty assigned them.

During the year 1813 "the Holland Land Company sold to the Lancaster Land Company one hundred and seventy thousand acres of land, mostly situated in Warren county and covering the territory now included in Mead, Pleasant, Kinzua, Cherry Grove, and Sheffield townships. The latter company immediately employed Samuel Dale, of Franklin, to re-survey and subdivide the original surveys into small lots of one hundred and sixty-five and two hundred and twenty-five acres each. This work was performed in 1814, numbering them anew from one to seven hundred and seventy. These lands have ever since been bought and sold, taxed and mapped, by these subdivision numbers. In 1816 these lots were partitioned among the several members of the company and the titles made to each in severalty.

"The hard times which followed the close of the War of 1812 - 15 seems to have crushed the ability or the spirit of these Lancaster gentlemen for further land speculation. Commencing with 1816, those lands began to be sold for taxes, and soon a great portion of them were in the tax market, sold and resold many times for unpaid taxes, for thirty years and upward, before their value was properly appreciated. Many other lands in the county, especially those in the northwestern part, between the river and Conewango Creek, have passed through the unseated tax mill and are now held by treasurers’ deeds. It is proper here to say, for the benefit of outsiders and newcomers, that the tax titles by which so large a portion of the land in the county is now owned, are generally very reliable and safe ones to deal in. They are free from complication, and it has been the policy of the law and the courts to sustain them, when not vitiated by gross irregularities."(5*)

In the summer of 1816 Rev. Timothy Alden, before mentioned as the founder of the Allegheny College, set out on a brief missionary tour among the Indians residing on the upper waters of the Allegheny, and spent some days at the village of the venerable chieftain, Cornplanter. Upon his return to Meadville he wrote a letter to the Rev. Joseph McKean, of Harvard University, giving an account of his labors, etc., wherein he says: "Cornplanter, as soon as apprised of our arrival, came over to see us, and immediately took charge of our horses. Though the chief Sachem of his tribe, and having many around to obey his commands, yet, in the ancient patriarchial style, he chose to serve himself and actually went into the field, cut the oats, and faithfully fed our beasts from time to time, while we continued in the place, in ipsa persona propria.

"Cornplanter has been the greatest warrior the Senecas have ever had; yet he has always been remarkable for his humane treatment of the women and children of his enemies, who at any time have fallen into his hands. He is a man of strong mind and masterly eloquence. At the treaty of Fort Stanwix, he greatly distinguished himself by his talents and address, insomuch that by general suffrage he has ever since held the first place of power among the chiefs of his nation.

"He appears to be about sixty-eight years of age." (Mr. Alden was mistaken as to Cornplanter’s age. He was born about 1732, and in 1816 was eighty-four years old.) "His countenance is strongly marked with the lines. of intelligence and reflection. Contrary to the aboriginal custom, his chin is covered with a beard three or four inches in length, and upon his head are many of the blossoms of age. His house is of princely dimensions compared with the generality of Indian huts, and has a piazza in front. He is the owner of about 1,500 acres of excellent land, 600 of which encircle the ground-plot of his little town. From the United States he receives, annually, according to stipulation, $250, besides his proportion of $9,000 equally divided, one half in goods and one half in money, among those of every age and condition in the tribe."

At this time (1816) the tax-paying inhabitants of the county were as follows:

Conewango Township.--Samue1 Anderson, James Arthur, who owned a. saw-mill, Robert Arthur, Senr., Boon Arthur, James Akin, Adam Acker, John Brown, John Brown, Jr., John Barr, David Brown, a tanner, and justice of the peace as early as 18i I, Andrew Buchanan, Ozias Barrett, Joseph Bailing,. John Cole, James Cole, Benjamin Covel, Isaiah Cole, Cornelius Cole, Samuel Campbell, Josiah Chandler, Charles Chandler, John Chandler, Charles Dougherty, William Davis, Thomas Davis, Ezra Devereaux, Henry Dunn, Levi Doan, who owned a saw-mill, Zachariah Eddy, Randall Evans, Daniel Faulkner, Stephen Frank, who owned a grist-mill, Robert Falconer, Luther Freeman, Joseph Fitch, Eli Granger, Widow Gilson, Joseph Gray, Asa Geer, Joseph Goodwin, Hackney & Harriott, owners of a saw-mill, Jacob Hook, who owned a saw-mill, John Hood, Samuel Hunter, owner of a grist-mill and sawmill, William Hodge, Ebenezer Jackson, Daniel Jackson, David Jackson, Isaiah Jones, justice of the peace, Jehu Jones, Edward Jones, John King, John Littlefield, Levi Morrison, Hugh Marsh, John Marsh, Webster Marsh, Jesse Murphy, owner of a grist and saw-mill, John Marsh, Jr., Michael McKinney, Joseph Mead, Ephriam Morrison, Samuel Morrison, owner of a saw-mill, Elisha Morrison, James Morrison, Senr., William Morrison, John Morrison, Robert Miles, Widow Miles, John Miles, James Morrison, Jr., William Miles, Samuel Magee(6*), John McClain, John Neville, Joseph Northrup, Abraham Osborn, Eben Owen, a blacksmith, James Portman, Squire Phillips, John Russell, Jr., Thomas Russell, Martin Reese, Jr., John Reese, Robert Russell, Michael Reese, John Russell, Senr., Stephen Rogers, Rankin & Cochran, owners of one-half of a saw-mill, Martin Reese, Senr., Christopher Schoonover, James Stanton, Simeon Scowden, James Stewart, Jr., Robert Stewart, William Stewart, Thomas Stewart, James Shipman, David Sturdevant, George Sweet, Jonathan Thompson, Caleb Thompson, and Asa Winter, owner of grist and saw-mills.

Brokenstraw Township. - Robert Andrews, justice of the peace, Arthur Andrews, James Andrews, William Arthur, Robert Arthur, owner one-half of saw-mill, Thomas Arthur, John Arthur, James Arthur, Richard Arthur, Nathan Abbott, George Berry, James Bonner, owner of a grist-mill and saw-mill, Samuel Burnett, Peter Burgett, owner of saw-mill, Robert Bell, Isaac Buckalew, Thomas Boyd, James Benson, Thomas Burbank, George Carpenter, James Culbertson, owner of a saw-mill, Alexander Clantz, Luther Chase, Daniel Corbett, owner of a saw-mill, John Courson, Stephen Carhart, George Cover, Henry Catlin, John Campbell, David Courson, John Camp, a millwright, Samuel Cole, David Dalrymple, Mark Dairymple, Clark Dalrymple, David Dalrymple, Jr., Robert Donaldson, Abraham Davis, John Davis, Isaac Davis, Elijah Davis, Abraham D. Ditmars, Benjamin Davis, Thomas Duprey, a blacksmith, Richard Duprey, John De France, James Darling, owner of saw-mill, John Elder, James Elder, Andrew Evers, Nathaniel Frampton, Obediah Ford, Samuel Ford, Isaac L. Fitch, John Gardner, Joseph Grant, Jacob Goodwin, who owned a saw-mill and one-half of a grist-mill, Joseph Gray, owner of a saw-mill, John Gillespie, merchant at Youngsville, John Gregg, Samuel Gregg, Nehemiah Gray, John Gibson, James Green, Daniel Horn, owner of saw-mill, John Hamilton, a blacksmith, William Hunter, Poland Hunter, William Hare, James Hamilton, Robert Hunter, Richard Henderson, Joel Hill, Daniel Houghwout, a joiner, Paul Huffman, Jacob Huffman, James Irvin, John Irvine, a merchant, Callender Irvine, Septimus King, Henry Kinnear, a merchant, Elijah Jackson, George Long, Cookson Long, owner of saw-mill, Hewlett Lott, Harmonious Lott, a merchant, William McClain, Solomon Miles, Richard Miller, William McGee, Patience McGuire, William McGuire, David Matthews, Arthur McGill, Samuel McGuire, Thomas McGuire, Samuel Moore, John McKinney, owner of saw-mill, Barnabas McKinney, John Mead, William Mead, Anna Mead, owner of one-half grist-mill and one-half saw-mill, Daniel McQuay, Charles McNair, Ephraim Miles, Humphrey Miller, Nathaniel Norris, Stephen Norris, James Phillis, Robert Prather, owner of saw-mill, Samuel Peoples, John Peoples, Leonard Pike, Thomas Page, Jonathan Rute, James Sturdevant, James Sturdevant, Jr., Peter Simons, George .Shultz, Jesse Sims, Charles Smith, Adam Shultz, David Stillson, Abraham Strickland, Thomas Sims, Richard Stewart, John Sample, Jr., George Siggins, Samuel Sprague, William Siggins, Stephen Sweet, William Smith, Robert Thompson, John Thompson, John Tuttle, Thomas Tubbs, James Williams, James Watts’ heirs, William White, Henry White, Samuel White, James White, Parsons Wetmore, Lansing Wetmore, William C. White, Canvas B. White, Hugh Wilson, Joshua Whitney, Alexander Watts, Amos York, Nehemiah York, Christopher Young and Mathew Young.

This is a remarkable showing, as compared with the list of taxables of eight years before, and clearly proves that hard times, cold seasons, litigations concerning land titles, and the War of 1812 - 15 had proved disastrous to the new settlements in Warren - had discouraged many and caused them to migrate to more congenial parts farther West; for, although this list discloses many new names, yet the number of tax-paying inhabitants in 1816 is exactly the same as that of 1808 - two hundred and fifty-six. During the next four years, however, a rapid increase in population took place; for when the county was organized in 1819 it contained nearly two thousand inhabitants.

 

 

* Soon after its acquisition from the Indians, by the treaties of Forts Stanwix and McIntosh, the northwestern part of Pennsylvania, as its boundaries were then described, was attached to the county of Westmoreland, by an act of the Supreme Executive Council, passed April 8, 1785; it being referred to in the said act, as "apart of the late purchase from the Indians." On the 24th of September, 1788, Allegheny county was formed from portions of Westmoreland and Washington, with boundaries from the mouth of Puckety’s Creek, "up the Allegheny River to the northern boundary of the State; thence west along the same to the western boundary of the State; thence south along the same to the River Ohio; and thence up the same to the place of beginning," i.e., the mouth of Flaherty’s Run, on the south side of the Ohio River. Lycoming county was formed from Northumberland, April 13, 1796, and its western boundary, for a great distance, was the Allegheny River.

** This was Judge Addison, of Pittsburgh. And here we are reminded that of those named in the following list of taxables, only those who were assessed for personal property can be counted with certainty as actual residents during the years mentioned.

*** At the June term of court, 1821, John Portman, then seventy-one years of age and living with Hugh Marsh, made affidavit that he enlisted in August, 1776, in a company commanded by Captain Moses Carson in the Eighth Regiment of the Pennsylvania Line, Continental Army. The regiment was commanded by Colonel Enos McCay until his death, and subsequently by Colonel D. Brodhead; that he (Portman) continued under the command of Carson until he (Carson) revolted, when the company was commanded by Captain John Findlay, with whom he served till the close of the war. The affidavit further states that Portman was engaged in the battles of Brandywine and Boundbrook and various skirmishes. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Brandywine and confined at James Island, S.C., but escaped the evening before the British evacuated Charleston.

The old veteran was then (1821) an insolvent debtor, and this statement was made under oath, to the end that he might avail himself of a recent act of Congress, passed for the relief and immunity from imprisonment of old soldiers thus circumstanced.

(4*) On the 15th of June, 1869, a number of the surviving soldiers of the War of 1812 - 15 met in Warren. Hon. William Siggins was chosen president of the meeting and Robert Miles secretary. They passed resolutions regarding the granting of pensions to soldiers of the last war with England, and were hospitably entertained by L.L. Lowry, Esq., at the Carver House, with a dinner sumptuous in its appointments. The veterans present were as follows: Zachariah Eddy, of Warren, aged ninety years; Robert Miles, of Warren, aged seventy-six years; Stephen Olney, of Warren, aged seventy-eight years; John Geer, of Glade township, aged seventy-eight years; Emanuel Crull, of Tidioute, aged eighty years; Caleb Thompson, of Pine Grove township, aged eighty-four years; Isaac Davis, of Brokenstraw township, aged seventy-seven years; John Brown, of Brokenstraw township, aged seventy-three years; William Siggins, of Youngsville, aged eighty years; Isaac Lopus, of Pittsfield, aged seventy-seven years; Elisha Sterling, of Limestone, aged eighty-one years. Ira Badger, of Pine Grove, aged seventy-four years, and Joseph Ackley of the same township, aged seventy-nine years, were also veterans of the same war, and living at that time, but were unable to attend the meeting.

(5*) Hon. S.P. Johnson.

(6*) At the June term of Court of Common Pleas, 1821, one James Magee, an insolvent debtor, then eighty-six years of age, made statement under oath that early in 1776 he enlisted in the State of Delaware in a company commanded by Captain Lattimore, called the "Wilmington Greens," for a term of fifteen months. Subsequently he re-enlisted in the same State in a company commanded by Captain Mitchell. His company was attached to Colonel Grayson’s regiment of the Virginia Line and served till 1780. Mr. Magee participated in the battles of Brandywine, Paoli, Germantown, and Monmouth.

SOURCE: Page(s) 125-141, History of Warren County, J.S. Schenck & W.S. Rann, Syracuse, New York: D. Mason, 1887