Allegheny Township

Created: Monday, 14 September 2015 Last Updated: Monday, 14 September 2015 Written by Administrator Print Email


<center><strong>HISTORY OF THE TOWNSHIP</strong></center>
Allegheny township was formed from a portion of Southampton in February, 1805. It takes its name from the Allegheny Mountain, which forms its western border.

Settlement was slow in this portion of the county, and it was many years before this township outgrew its primitive qualities. After other portions of the county had become comparatively well populated, much of Allegheny remained unimproved, and afforded a favorite resort for hunters.

Breastwork run, a favorite resort for fishermen on account of the large number of brook-trout which it contains, derives its name from breastworks thrown up at its source during the revolutionary war.

Some of the first settlers of the township were Anthony Luken, George Keller, Henry Boyer, Adam Boling and John Cook. Others were:
John Ware, whose children were: John, George, Henry, Joseph and Susanna. John was born in this township in 1807 and died in 1874. About 1846 he purchased the farm of three hundred and sixty-three acres on which his son William now resides. William has held several township offices. He served a short time in the late (Civil) war.

John Geiger, a native of Berks county, came to this township in 1834, settling upon an unimproved farm, of which he has since cleared about seventy- five acres.

Henry Felton, a mason by trade, was born in Germany and came to America in 1856. After residing two years at Baltimore and four in Cumberland, Maryland, he removed to Allegheny Township and purchased a farm of two hundred acres, upon which he now resides. Mr. Felton has held the office of school director for eight years.

John C. Reitz, who was born in Stony Creek township, settled in Allegheny in 1868, on a farm of four hundred and fifteen acres, purchased of Jacob B. Hullegass. In 1877 he erected a planning- mill, and in 1882 rebuilt it. He also has a sawmill and a sash and door factory. All are run by steam-power. Mr. Reitz manufactures all kinds of building lumber.

In 1859 Jacob B. Hillegass, now of New Buena Vista, Bedford county, purchased of John Keff’s heirs a tract of fifteen hundred acres of land in Allegheny township. He has since disposed of about one thousand acres. His son, William H., owns nearly seven hundred acres of the tract mentioned, having purchased it in 1881. He is principally engaged in farming and stock-raising.

The area of Allegheny Township is 29, 925 acres or about forty-six and three-fourths square miles. It contained 124 farms and had a population of 670 persons in 1930. The only borough in the township is New Baltimore.

(Source: Partially extracted from History of Bedford, Somerset &amp; Fulton Counties, PA; 1884)

<center><strong>BIOGRAPHIES</strong></center>
<a href="/http://www.pa-roots.org/data/read.php?720,575174,575174#msg-575174"><u>Gregory Hankinson</u></a> -- <a href="/http://www.pa-roots.org/data/read.php?720,575066,575066#msg-575066"><u>Abraham Riffle</u></a> -- <a href="/http://www.pa-roots.org/data/read.php?720,363830,363830#msg-363830"><u>Charles F. Smith</u></a> -- <a href="/http://www.pa-roots.org/data/read.php?720,363832,363832#msg-363832"><u>Matthias Suhre</u></a> -- <a href="/http://www.pa-roots.org/data/read.php?720,575063,575063#msg-575063"><u>John M. Topper</u></a><br>
<a href="/http://www.pa-roots.org/data/read.php?720,574637"><u>Philip Walker</u></a> -- <a href="/http://www.pa-roots.org/data/read.php?720,575175,575175#msg-575175"><u>Francis Weber</u></a> -- <a href="/http://www.pa-roots.org/data/read.php?720,363833,363833#msg-363833"><u>Henry H. Wolfhop</u></a>

<center><strong>CHURCHES</strong></center>
<a href="/articles.php?article_id=156"><u>St. John\'s Roman Catholic</u></a> -- <a href="/articles.php?article_id=155"><u>St. Luke\'s Reformed</u></a> -- <a href="/articles.php?article_id=157"><u>Union Church</u></a>

<center><strong>TAX LISTS</strong></center>
<a href="/articles.php?article_id=154"><u>1814</u></a> -- <a href="/articles.php?article_id=386"><u>1878</u></a>

<center><strong>TOWNS &amp; VILLAGES</strong></center>
<a href="/articles.php?article_id=159"><u>New Baltimore</u></a> -- <a href="/articles.php?article_id=279"><u>Fair Hope</u></a>