Democratic Banner, Clearfield, 1848 Issues

Created: Saturday, 27 December 2008 Last Updated: Friday, 15 March 2013 Written by Nathan Zipfel Print Email

Democratic Banner

Clearfield, Pa.

 

January 1, 1848

 

Married on Thursday the 30th ult., by the Rev. S. P. Lane, Mr. Richard Shaw, jun., to Miss Hannah Fulton, both of Lawrence township, in this county.

 

Married on Wednesday the 22d ult., by --- ----, Mr. W. T. Gilbert, to Miss. Elizabeth Elder, both of Bell township, this county.

 

Died at the residence of her son-in-law, in Boggs township, on Sunday the 26th day of December, ultimo, Mary Wisor, relict of John Wisor, dec’d, at the advanced age of 84 years – leaving a large circle of relatives and friends.

The deceased was among the first settlers in the county – having come to it in the year 1804.  There are but few who live to see a large number of their own offspring than the deceased – she being the mother of 10 children, 95 grand children, and about 100 great grand children.

 

Died in Lawrence township, on the 29th ult., Helena, infant daughter of Samuel Clyde, aged 11 months and 11 days.

 

Fatal Accident.

A most melancholy accident occurred in Woodward township, about a mile and a half above this place, on Saturday last.  While Mr. John Quigley was driving the horses attached to the horsepower of a Threshing Machine, his leg was by some means caught between the shafts, and before the horses could be stopped, or he in any extricated, he was so badly injured that he died in about seven hours after.  His leg from the knee to the ankle was completely mashed, and which in addition to a severe contusion in the groin and several internal injuries, shortly proved fatal.  He was injured at about four o’clock, P. M., and died at about eleven o’clock ensuing.  He was one of the oldest and most respectable citizens of Clinton county.  His age was about 70 years. Clinton Democrat.

 

In the Matter of Henry Reams, deceased, late of Brady township, Clearfield county.

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania,

To John Reams, Elizabeth Wright, David Wright, William Reams, Jane Reams, Susannah Reams and Henry Reams, assignees of Samuel Reams, Andrew Ross, and Sarah, his wife, (children and heirs of Henry Reams) and to all other persons interested:

            You are herby cited to be and appear before the Judges of our Orphans Court to be held at Clearfield on the first day of February, A. D., 1848, at 10 o’clock in the forenoon, then and there to accept or refuse to take the real estate of the said Henry Reams, deceased, situate in Brady township, said county, at the appraised valuation put upon it by the inquest duly held and returned to the said Court at the November term, 1847, to wit: - the tract of land of 196 acres, appraised at two hundred dollars.  Witness the Honorable George W. Woodward, President of said court, at Clearfield, the 18th day of December, A. D., 1847.

 

Murder. – Two men, named Thomas Mitchel and Anthony M’Dermont, had a dispute with a fellow laborer, by the name of Patrick M’Quade – high words ensued, when the two seized and hurled him into the Juniata river, and he was drowned.  The perpetrators of this high handed outrage are now confined in the Dauphin co., jail awaiting their trial. – Harrisburg Union, Dec. 22.

 

Caution – Is hereby given to all persons not to harbor or trust on my account, a certain boy named George Barnet, who absconded from me.  Said boy is about 17 years of age, and was indentured to me until he attained the age of 21 years.  Wm. Irvin.

 

January 8, 1848

 

Awful scene in a Menagerie.

            On Wednesday of last week the city of Philadelphia was thrown into a state of terrible excitement by an accident which happened at Raymond & Waring’s Menagerie, followed by the most deplorable consequences.  From the Daily News of Thursday morning, we copy the following extended notice of the tragedy.

            The large and well known elephant “Columbus” became restive about one o’clock yesterday afternoon, as his keeper, Wm. Kelley, was preparing him for the afternoon performances, and in consequence of being struck, seized Mr. Kelley with his trunk, and raising him into the air, dashed him twice to the ground with the utmost violence, breaking his right leg & thigh in a most shocking manner, and causing many other very serious injuries. The peculiar cry of the enraged animal as he seized Mr. Kelley warned those in the other part of the building of what was going one, and rushing to the quarter where the elephant was kept, they succeeded in snatching the wounded man out of the way as he was about being seized a third time.  The elephant then commenced a general demolition of everything within his reach, tearing a number of cages to atoms, and hurling their fragments in every direction.  At this time the utmost terror and excitement prevailed.  The furious animal, on first coming from his quarters, proceeded round the room, as in search of some one, and then returning, seized with his trunk a large cage containing two hyenas, a wolf, a jackal and some twenty monkeys, and carrying it into the room, after whirling it into the air, dashed it into a thousand fragments upon the floor, scattering the animals and killing some of the smaller ones.  Some ran away and hid themselves, while others, terror stricken and furious, ran about the room howling hideously.  Two elephant dogs were then procured and thrown into the ring.  These dogs are used in India to hunt the elephant, and are there trained to avoid his feet and trunk, while they actively fly about attacking him in the most vulnerable parts, and holding him until he can be secured.  But on this occasion they were both struck by the elephant, and so maimed as to be entirely useless.  They were accordingly removed, and preparations made for shooting the animal, by order of Mayor Swift, who having been sent for shortly after the accident to the keeper, proceeded immediately to the scene with a large body of police.  A great crowd had by this time assembled around the doors both on Walnut street and George, and the large police force was hardly sufficient to keep back the crowd, who, despite the danger, seemed anxious to rush in and witness the terrible scene of havoc.

            In the meantime the elephant was doing great damage to all the fixtures of the establishment within his reach, tearing down railings, demolishing the arena, and shivering everything like wood-work to atoms.  Herr Driesbach, who was present, used every effort to intimidate and subdue the animal by his well-known voice, but in vain.  A grappling hook, with a strong rope attached, was thrown into the ring, with a view to catch it in the animal’s hide, the thickness of which, however, proved impervious to the assault. – Thirty or forty muskets had also been procured from the armory of the Washington Greys in Franklin Hall, and these were loaded and kept in readiness for use, in the city Watch house, in George street, adjoining the back of the Menagerie, in the event of the animal’s escaping, as his vicious character was well known.  Loaded muskets were also placed in the saloon of the building for the use of those who were in the side boxes endeavoring to catch the elephant.  At length a plan was suggested by Mr. J. J. Nathans of Welch’s National Circus, which proved successful, being similar to that used in Charleston a few years ago.  A strong rope was tied in a running noose in such a position that the elephant, in running at those who placed it in its position, must tread in the noose.  This he did, and immediately the persons who had hold of the rope pulled, and succeeded in catching him by one of the fore legs, when a strong force was at once mustered, and efforts made to pull him to the recess at the south-west corner of the building; but the animal,  now more furious than ever, ran towards the boxes which descended from the front gallery to the arena, and in endeavoring to ascend, crushed the steps, &c., to atoms with his immense weight, tearing up the benches on either side of him as far up as one fourth of the ascent, hurling the pieces at the same time in every direction, and leaving the place a perfect wreck. – Finding that it would not sustain his weight, he retreated into the arena, where after some trouble, a number of large hooks attached to ropes, were very adroitly fastened into his ears, and he was then hauled up into the recess before mentioned, where, by the self possession and courage of Herr Driesbach, he was completely subdued.

            While these things were going on in the interior, the intelligence of the occurrence had rapidly spread, & an immense crowd, numbering some thousands, had assembled, both in Walnut and George streets, expecting momentarily to see the elephant make his egress.  The roof of the Institute was also crowded with eager spectators, and all was excitement, not unmingled with much alarm.  Meanwhile, that the animal might not escape, Mayor Swift had sent to the Arsenal for a couple of six pounders, which arriving with ammunition &c., were properly manned, when one was planted in front of the side door on Walnut street, and the other in George street.  The pieces were fully loaded, & the crowd kept in waiting, expecting some great result, until about three and a half o’clock, when it was announced that the animal had been secured, and an order given for the cannon to be removed, which was accordingly done, but the crowd still lingered, many forcing themselves into the building, the police force at the doors being weaker than the curiosity of the crowd.  The elephant, once confined, became less restive, and finally stood still, and was strongly chained and numerous ropes placed about him, when he was dragged out into the arena where the letters were all removed, excepting the chains upon his feet, and after some little trouble Herr Driesbach succeeded in getting him to lie down.  He roared fiercely at first, but a length submitted, and with a degree of grace, did his master’s bidding.  The animal being thus entirely subdued, the crowd, which had assembled in the interior, bestowed enthusiastic plaudits upon Herr Driesbach, who thereupon mounted the elephant’s head as the animal lay in the arena & addressed the assemblage, returning his thanks, and remarking that that was the proudest day of his life.

            The wrecks were cleared away as well as possible, and it was announced to the crowd, both inside & out, that there would be a performance in the evening as usual.

 

DARING ROBBERY – FIFTY-ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS STOLEN- $5,000 REWARD.

From Bicknell’s Reporter, Dec. 28.

            A most daring robbery was committed in our city on Thursday last.  It appears that Dr. Darlington, President of the Chester county Bank, entered the West Chester Cars a few minutes before 3 o’clock, for the purpose of proceeding home – having with him a valise, containing about $51,100, chiefly in notes on the Chester County Bank, and including also, a large amount in gold.  There were besides, a great number of drafts, bills, outes of hand, &c.  This valise was placed by Dr. D. immediately under the seat on which he was sitting; but we are informed that he moved from the spot for a moment or two only – and when he returned, the valise was gone!  An instant alarm was raised, the police officers were soon on the alert, and every effort is now in progress to discover the thief or thieves, and property.  The drafts and notes of hand are of no value whatever to any person except the parties whose names are attached to them; and it is therefore hoped that these valuable papers may be brought to light, but the enormous amount of booty in good notes and gold renders this robbery the largest that has occurred in Philadelphia for many years.

            Another account in the News says: -

            “Upon getting into the cars at the depot on Broad street, he placed the money, which was in a valise, between his knees, one end of the valise resting upon the bottom of the car, supposing that in such a position, immediately beneath his eyes, it was perfectly safe.  There were several persons seated around him; but before him a gentleman sat upon a seat alone, and another in a recumbent position, occupied a seat behind him.  Soon after the cars had started. Dr. Darlington turned towards the opposite side of the car, still retaining his seat, to hold a moment’s converse with a lady with whom he was acquainted, and who was also a passenger; but upon resuming his position after a very brief space, he found that the valise was gone, and at the same time noticed also that both the gentlemen previously noticed as sitting before and behind him had also left.  Information of the loss was immediately given and the doors of the car closed, when a rigid search was had, but no trace of the valise could be found, nor could, Dr. D. recognize among the passengers either of the persons who had been seated near him.  He immediately came to the city and communicated all the information he possessed to Mayor Swift, who, with his officers, were busily engaged during the balance of the day in endeavoring to ferret out the perpetrators of the robbery.  Three individuals were seen to leave the car about the time the money was taken, but Dr. Darlington had not observed those seated near him sufficiently to describe them with any degree of accuracy.”

 

AWFUL STEAMBOAT EXPLOSION.

Cincinnati, Dec. 30, 1847.

[From the Pennsylvania.]

            We have to record another startling calamity on our river.  The steamer A. N. Johnson, bound from this place to Wheeling, blew up yesterday with a tremendous explosion, near Maysville, Ky., from some unascertained detect in her machinery.  By this casualty, between sixty and seventy persons were killed, by scalding, fire or drowning, and a very large number scalded, of whom some thirty are so horribly injured, that their recovery is doubtful.

            Among the killed, we hear the names of first clerk Fairchild, engineer Lyles, and pilot Redman.  Among the scalded are Messrs. Everhart and son, and G. S. Wetherly, of Philadelphia, Wheat and Rillson, of Baltimore, and John Galbraith, of Pittsburg.  Messrs. Arthur Fole, T. McDonald, James Wickersham, G. Baker, and J. Ferguson, of Pittsburg, are among the saved.

            So rapid was the progress of the flames after the explosion, and so complete the devastation, that hardly an effort could be made for self preservation.  The boat was soon in one sheet of fire and burned to the water’s edge.  The number of passengers on board the A. N. Johnson when this appalling accident occurred, was one hundred and sixty, not more than one quarter of whom escaped injury.  So dreadful an accident has rarely, if ever, occurred on the Ohio.

            The list of the killed and wounded is as yet, of course, very incomplete, and as in most case of the kind, there were probably many individuals on board whose names will be ever unknown.  The occurrence, as may be presumed, has occasioned great excitement and deep sympathy here.

 

 

January 15, 1848

 

Died in Punxsutawney, on the 1st last, Mrs. Catharine, consort of Thomas McKee, Esq.

 

 

January 22, 1848

 

A TERRIBLE SCENE.

            The destruction of the steamboat A. N. Johnson seems to have been a most horrible scene.  The Maysville Flag says that the explosion blew up the cabin deck, and when many of the passengers opened the cabin doors, to make their escape, they were precipitated into the hold, and there, with twenty-seven horses, were seen writhing in the flames.  None of them escaped.

            One poor fellow was seen caught under a part of the wreck, when it had burnt nearly to the water’s edge.  Nothing could save him.  As he cast his look of despair imploringly on the spectators, the wreck sunk, carrying him down with it.

            The Cincinnati commercial says:  The scene of heart-rending agony on board the boat was indescribable.  There were the dead and they dying – the flames bursting from every part of the boat – the shrieks of men as they sank into the flames to rise no more – the wild fright of the horses – all conspired to render the scene beyond the power of language to depict; but the agony of those who perished instantly by the explosion, sunk into the flames or were thrown into the water to rise no more, were short, and their fate we could almost say preferable to some who survived – their flesh burnt to a coal and peeling from their bones.  In the midst of suffering the most acute that the human frame can endure, men in the depth of their agony were begging to be shot, calling for axes and other instruments by which they might end their sufferings. – on the shore and in the adjacent cornfield were to be seen the most frightful spectacles.  Heads, trunks, limbs, and every part of the human frame, torn from the other parts and in fragments scattered around.

            It is gratifying to know that all the female passengers were saved, the explosion not reaching their cabin.  It has been ascertained that about $20,000 in money was lost.  The cause of the explosion is generally supposed to have been a want of water in the boilers; though the second engineer, who was mortally injured, declared in his last moments, that the steam was not high, and that he had tried the gauge cocks and found plenty of water.     Sat. Eve. Post.

 

Married in Morris township, on Thursday the 13th inst., by S. C. Thompson, Esq., Mr. Joseph Stites, of Boggs tp., to Miss Sarah Kylar, of Bradford township.

 

Died in Girard township, on Tuesday last, Joseph Heise, aged about 40 years.

 

Died on Wednesday last, also in Girard township, Mrs. Polly, wife of William Murray.

 

ANOTHER DISASTER. – The steamboat Blue Ridge blowed up on the 18th instant, on the Ohio River, below Pittsburg, by which about thirty persons were killed.

 

 

January 29, 1848

 

The Hon. John W. Hornbeck, member of Congress from the Bucks and Lehigh district, Pa., died at his residence in Allentown, on the 16th instant.

 

Married on Thursday the 20th inst., by the Rev. James Linn, Mr. Horace Patchin, of this county, to Sarah Ann, daughter of Daniel Weaver, Esq., of Spring tp., Centre co.

 

 

February 12, 1848

 

Married on Thursday, the 27th ult. by the Rev. Alexander Boyd, Mr. James Ray, of Jordan tp., to Miss Jane Dillion, of Mount-pleasant.

 

Married on Tuesday the 8th inst., by John L. Cuttle, Esq., Mr. Robert Thompson, to Miss Mary Daniel, both of Lawrence tp.

 

Died at the residence of her mother, in this place, on Monday morning the 31st January, after an affliction of several years, which she bore with the patience which is only manifested in the meek and lowly Christian, Isabella, daughter of the late E. Magee, aged 22 years.

 

Died in Curnwensville, on Tuesday, the 1st inst., Hon. John Patton, at an advanced age.

 

Mary Goodwalt, by her next friend vs. George E. Goodwalt.  In the Court of Common Pleas of Clearfield county.

Alias Sub. Sur. Divorce.  No. 16, January Term, 1848.

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to George E. Goodwalt.  Greeting:

Whereas, Mary Goodwalt, formerly Mary Lines, by her father and next friend, Joseph Lines, did, on the 30th day of November last past, prefer her petition to our Judges of the Court of Common Pleas of the county of Clearfield, at a court held at Clearfield in and for said county, praying that for the causes therein set forth, she might be divorced from the bonds of matrimony entered into with you the said George E. Goodwalt: - We therefore command you, as we before commanded you the said George E. Goodwalt, that, setting aside all other business and excuses whatsoever, you be and appear in your proper person before our Judges, at Clearfield, at our Court of Common Pleas, there to be held for the said county, on the first Monday of May next, (1848) to answer the petition, or libel, of the said Mary, and to shew cause, if any you have, why the said Mary, your wife, should not be divorced from the bonds of matrimony agreeably to the act of Assembly in such case made and provided, and hereof you are not to ---. – Witness, George W. Woodward, Esq., President of our said Court, at Clearfield, the 3d day of February, A.D. 1848.

 

 

February 26, 1848

 

We have good authority for stating that the old mail route from this place to Karthaus, is in a fair way to be reestablished – to go down one side of the river, and up the other.  This route never should have been suspended.

 

Married on Sunday the 20th inst., by the Rev. P. P. Lane, Mr. James Miles, to Miss Lydia Dressler, both of Brady township.

 

Married on Thursday, the 3d inst., by J. M. Shaw, Esq., Mr. John B. Shimmel, to Miss Priscilla Crosgrove, both of Boggs township.

 

Married on Sunday, the 20th inst., by J. M. Shaw, Esq., Mr. James Dixon, to Miss Sarah Ann Shimmel, both of Boggs township.

 

Died on Saturday night, the 19th inst., in Lawrence township, Mrs. Jane, wife of Leonard Odgen, after a lingering illness, of Consumption, aged about 20 years.

 

Died on Monday last, also in Lawrence township, Mr. Charles Lytle, at an advanced age.  The deceased has suffered for many years with cancer in the face.

 

March 4, 1848

 

Obituary.

Departed this life, at his residence about two miles from this place, on Tuesday evening last, the 29th of February, after an illness of several weeks, ISAIAH GOODFELLOW, Esq., in the 60th year of his age.

            As a citizen, the deceased was upright and honest – as a neighbor, kind and obliging – as a friend, affable and courteous – as a father and husband, his demeanor and example was such as to secure the esteem and affection of his family.  Mr. Goodfellow had for many years been a zealous member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he had filled many official stations, with credit to himself, and to the satisfaction of the church. And in the last moments of his life, he manifested unbounded confidence in that Redeemer, in whom he had trusted for many years.  He died as he had live – a Christian.

 

 

March 11, 1848

 

Treasurer’s Sale

Of Unseated Lands for Taxes, in Clearfield county.

2d Monday of June next, at the court-house, in the borough of Clearfield.

 

Baccaria township.

Acres

Pr’s

Warrantee

Tax

151

50

Thomas Ketland

6

16

200

146

Abraham Witmer

8

20

234

66

Michael Mosser

9

56

235

153

Jacob Krug

9

62

236

145

John Gibson

9

54

127

144

Jeremiah Mosher

5

82

258

6

Peter Getz

9

72

210

84

Martin Foutz

8

61

296

125

Jacob Foutz

10

98

328

153

George Musser

13

04

433

153

Robert Wilson

17

74

66

12

Thomas Gibson

3

44

324

84

Matthias Barton

13

79

433

153

Edward Hand

17

74

433

153

John Ewing

17

74

274

75

Peter Miller

11

47

133

153

Michael Fontz

5

57

88

60

John Mails

3

75

71

133

Martin Ma—s

2

90

355

133

Emanuel Reighart

12

11

259

43

George Moore

10

58

433

153

George Moore jr.

17

74

325

 

John Funk

13

73

139

113

Henry Landis

6

04

381

68

Frederick Hobley

15

31

231

79

John Bausman

10

24

483

158

John Whitmer

17

74

155

135

Frederick Honman

6

82

88

156

Philip Gloninger

3

17

232

 

Philip Messencope

9

48

197

68

John Messencope

8

07

108

55

Adam Messencope

4

56

259

157

Wm. Bausman

10

69

483

153

John Bean

17

74

201

 

Jacob Mussersmith

8

70

176

46

Jeremiah Mosher

7

18

288

120

Jacob King

11

78

138

3

Thomas Ballington

6

57

399

40

John Whitmer

16

35

399

40

Henry Whitmer

16

36

399

40

Herman Whitmer

16

37

177

150

Thomas Billington

8

16

834

145

William Wilson

13

68

193

53

Sarah Billington

7

98

251

 

William Brown

10

25

433

153

David Barton

17

74

176

47

John Shenk

7

18

130

 

Martin Foutz

2

47

72

120

Sol. Lyons (undiv. ½)

3

01

256

58

John Baker

10

67

172

 

Wm. McMurtrie

3

85

108

 

--- Plunket

4

48

50

 

David Younkin

2

06

 

BELL TOWNSHIP

Warrant

Acres

Pr’s.

Warrantee

Tax

3566

648

 

John Nicholson

23

10

3565

354

 

John Nicholson

12

37

 

13

 

John P. Hoyt

 

42

 

175

 

Thomas Drunelan

5

69

 

433

153

John Dunwodie

12

29

 

300

 

Mehaffy & Daugherty

11

05

 

200

 

Walters & Elder

7

00

           

 

BOGGS TOWNSHIP

Acres

Pr’s

Warrantee

Tax

174

116

John Montgomery

4

19

177

102

Richard Thomas

4

77

100

 

Richard Thomas

4

38

 

 

LOTS IN BOROUGH OF CLEARFIELD.

NO.

NAME

TAX

23

Jacob Kline

2

75

35

F. Gundecker

2

65

90

Lindley & Hoofnagle

1

41

104

Jacob Kline

1

36

105

A. B. Reed

1

16

106

Hugh Wilson

1

17

137

Daniel Brobaker

 

99

139

A. B. Reed

1

19

140

Jacob Kline

1

37

141

Peter Burg

2

58

91

 

1

37

44

 

 

87

 

 

BRADFORD TOWNSHIP

Acres

Pr’s

Warrantee

Tax

202

140

Jane Campbell

7

65

202

140

Jane Campbell  west ½

6

56

197

35

John Campbell

5

65

370

12

Aaron Levy

15

49

242

 

Matthew Fo-cey

7

90

354

61

James Duncan

13

43

 

 

BRADY TOWNSHIP

No.

Acres

Warrantee

Tax

250

220

Robert Currey

7

08

 

115

Samuel Johnson

4

21

195

77

Casper Stiver

2

47

5681

263

Joseph Ferron

8

45

 

150

Woodside’s Heirs

9

74

 

100

George Gonter

3

70

218

501

Christian Lower

13

75

110

370

Christian Lower (4 years)

21

28

 

 

BURNSIDE TOWNSHIP

No.

Acres

Pr’s

Warrantee

Tax

1433

144

61

David Kennedy

7

11

 

328

 

Peter Smith

14

24

 

COVINGTON TOWNSHIP

No.

Acres

Warrantee

Tax

1897

875

Morris & Stewart

38

46

1898

1040

Morris & Stewart

45

76

1899

890

Morris & Stewart

31

15

1903

1052

Morris & Stewart

46

26

1902

970

Morris & Stewart

34

05

1942

545

Morris & Stewart

14

14

1890

 

 

 

 

1892

1100

Morris & Stewart

36

70

1894

 

 

 

 

 

CHEST TOWNSHIP

433

153

George Ross

13

29

433

153

John Musser

13

30

           

 

DECATUR TOWNSHIP.

 

 

 

Tax

417

124

Thomas P. Cope

19

75

364

70

Hugh Eli

18

47

299

40

John Skyron

13

32

216

39

John Skyron

10

92

274

8

Thomas P. Cope

16

64

306

49

Wm. Sansom

15

18

307

 

Joseph Sansom

15

77

210

12

John Skyron

11

29

408

137

Richard Thomas

19

72

408

137

John Downing

8

15

430

 

John Eli

8

60

391

159

Thomas Billington

14

23

400

 

Joseph Ruper

14

60

 

FERGUSON TOWNSHIP

 

 

 

Tax

233

139

John Hambright

5

05

200

 

William Drinker

5

05

132

12

John Mussersmith

3

82

200

 

P. Gloninger

3

91

 

FOX TOWNSHIP

No.

Acres

 

Tax

4272

639

James Wilson

4

75

4200

990

James Wilson

6

47

4182

990

James Wilson

6

47

4181

990

James Wilson

6

48

4188

990

James Wilson

6

47

4271

990

James Wilson

6

47

4183

990

James Wilson

6

47

4241

937

James Wilson

24

79

4238

947

James Wilson

21

02

4242

642

James Wilson

18

98

4340

188

James Wilson

4

16

4090

923

James Wilson

20

54

1534

170

James Wilson

3

78

1535

600

James Wilson

13

35

4398

216

James Wilson

4

68

4399

372

James Wilson

8

25

4400

44

James Wilson

 

74

 

GIRARD TOWNSHIP

 

 

 

Tax

 

200

Samuel Fulton

7

05

 

18

Samuel Fulton

2

38

1936

103

Morris & Stewart

3

56

 

HUSTON TOWNSHIP

No.

Acres

Pr’s

Warrantee

Tax

5069

990

 

William Powers

8

43

5062

990

 

William Powers

8

43

5673

1041

81

Moore Delany

21

58

5674

1041

81

Moore Delany

21

58

 

195

 

David Caldwell

6

41

4257

888

15

James Wilson

7

72

4261

990

 

James Wilson

7

71

4193

927

28

James Wilson

7

61

4254

927

28

James Wilson

7

61

4256

886

 

James Wilson

7

70

4902

420

 

Wilhelm Willink

6

93

4231

770

 

James Wilson

11

77

4234

796

 

James Wilson

12

10

4235

989

 

James Wilson

16

29

4236

990

 

James Wilson

16

30

4226

990

 

James Wilson

16

30

4229

965

123

James Wilson

15

88

4230

728

112

James Wilson

11

99

4225

990

 

James Wilson

16

30

4889

723

 

Wilhelm Willink

5

94

5670

1041

80

Moore & Delany

22

47

5671

1041

80

Moore & Delany

22

47

5679

1041

80

Moore & Delany

22

47

5672

347

27

Moore & Delany

8

58

306

203

 

John B. Smith

6

66

4889

267

 

Wilhelm Willink (east end)

4

36

 

 

JORDAN TOWNSHIP

 

 

 

Tax

216

156

Adam Reighart

7

52

197

80

Silas Wilcot

7

67

358

 

Charles Hight

10

97

287

107

Daniel Turner

8

78

67

 

Robert Smock

8

28

600

 

G. & M. McCormick

38

95

100

 

Donald McDonald

6

15

 

KARTHAUS TOWNSHIP

No.

Acres

Pr’s

 

Tax

1900

1080

 

Morris & Stewart

38

88

1901

816

 

Morris & Stewart

29

34

1943

507

12

Morris & Stewart

18

20

1093

200

 

Morris & Stewart

21

60

1093

79

22

Charles Willink

2

90

1023

88

 

Charles Willink

3

23

3463

 

 

 

 

 

2475

638

147

Charles Willink

20

81

 

LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP

No.

Acres

 

Tax

1907

87

Martin Nichols

6

24

 

413

John Reed

15

01

 

100

Robert Boggs

1

75

 

MORRIS TOWNSHIP

Acres

Pr’s

 

Tax

439

44

Richard R. Smith

3

96

327

 

Philip Wager

10

28

310

 

Bernard Gratz

11

16

332

148

Reuben Haines, jr.

11

05

382

12

Joseph Simons

13

75

438

40

William Stewart

15

76

447

112

Joseph Henry

16

09

445

112

Casper Shaffner

16

06

442

16

William Morris

16

00

428

91

Walter Stewart

15

40

436

114

Robert Shaw

15

69

95

47

Andrew Douglass

3

34

466

87

Reuben Haynes

16

77

417

151

Jacob Krug

15

01

261

80

John Moore

9

39

331

27

Robert Morris

10

62

433

153

James Wilson

15

62

328

91

John Morgan

11

80

193

47

Jacob Morgan

6

98

431

114

Hyman Gratz

12

97

466

86

Jacob Wetzel

13

14

411

44

Charles Hall

14

79

420

68

George Moore

15

12

225

86

Hilary Baker

8

10

201

135

Christopher Baker

11

70

444

45

Paul Wetzel

15

98

474

105

David Hall

16

92

443

67

Simon Gratz

15

98

451

120

Blair McLinahan

16

23

200

150

John Nicholson (west ½)

7

20

446

24

George Weitzel

16

00

238

110

Wm. D. Kerwin

8

56

433

153

Casper Haynes

15

62

385

28

Christopher Baker

13

86

388

115

John Barron

13

90

239

 

Samuel Miles, jr.

8

64

188

 

Samuel Miles

6

76

161

80

Charles Smith

5

79

218

 

John Price

3

91

421

 

Jesse Yarnell

15

12

150

 

Christian Musser

5

40

300

 

Peter Yarnell

16

35

 

WOODWARD TOWNSHIP

436

145

John McCahen

20

63

196

 

Daniel Offley

9

08

119

44

John Limpblack

5

43

231

65

Pittot Shaw

14

98

223

61

Thomas Edmunson

14

83

385

108

Benjamin Wilson

19

31

216

137

George Baker, jr.

9

57

193

122

Matthias Young

9

46

436

145

Piggot Shaw

20

59

436

145

John McCahen

20

60

431

147

Thomas Edmunson

19

87

221

86

Benjamin Wilson

16

69

215

 

Thomas Neal

9

36

131

 

Mary Conelly

4

53

339

70

Mary Neal

15

23

333

153

Thomas Yedlar

14

74

216

 

John Musser, jr.

9

98

216

 

Sebastian Graff

9

19

438

73

Thomas Edmunson

20

22

433

153

Thomas Groves

7

56

297

 

Philip Deffedaffer

14

96

119

26

Christian Stake

5

43

433

153

Christian Hague

20

08

436

145

Joseph Ashbridge

19

82

433

153

John Burg

20

14

436

145

Timothy Paxton

20

58

326

 

John Drinker

15

57

408

107

Jacob Downing

17

89

387

30

Henry Drinker

16

93

101

30

W. Montgomery

4

05

57

10

David Zeigler

3

71

191

59

John Cannon

7

90

236

28

Jacob Downing

12

10

241

106

George Graff

10

33

100

 

Richard Atherton

4

62

130

 

Maris Alberti

4

39

427

30

Mary Sandwich

14

71

457

30

Elizabeth Hootman

11

04

397

105

Charles Louden

10

20

427

30

George Whitehead

11

04

427

30

John Louden

11

04

427

30

Peter Louden

11

04

427

40

John Harrison

11

04

433

 

Thomas Maston

11

16

243

 

H. Fraunce

4

17

427

30

Robert McKee

11

04

431

85

Joseph Clarke

5

48

160

 

Wm. Wistar

5

07

100

 

Lisle McCully

3

45

300

 

John Morgan

4

75

 

PENN TOWNSHIP

No.

Acres

 

Tax

583

400

Andrew Kees

7

95

582

200

Andrew Kees

5

25

 

168

Greenwood Bell

8

04

5959

430

John P. Hoyt

15

05

5951

10

Nicklin & Griffith

 

72

 

PIKE TOWNSHIP

 

 

 

 

Tax

5778

1820

 

John Nicholson

8

88

4250

600

 

James Wilson

3

97

4250

323

109

James Wilson

3

00

4251

850

 

James Wilson

7

39

4252

957

85

James Wilson

7

74

100

100

 

Robert Taylor

3

09

5777

1020

24

John Nicholson

8

88

 

18

 

John P. Hoyt

 

73

 

13

 

John P. Hoyt

 

58

 

60

 

John P. Hoyt

2

03

 

100

 

Wm. Hartshorn

3

55

Treasurer’s Office, Clearfield, March 10, 1848, Isaac Bloom, jr., Treasurer.

 

 

April 15, 1848

 

FIVE DESTRUCTIVE FIRES IN PITTSBURGH.

Pittsburgh, April 12.

            Our city this morning was visited with no less than five terribly destructive fires.  The first fire broke out in a stable near the canal, and before the flames could be subdued, twenty-six houses were destroyed, and three smoke houses, containing seven hundred thousand pounds of bacon, the property of Holmes Brother, Jordan & Son, Atcheson & Dagg, J. Dalzell, and Carson & Mckingle.  The smoke houses were insured.

            Four houses were consumed at the second fire, including Hill’s Paper Factory.  At the third fire, four houses were destroyed, two of them dwellings, besides a stable.  At the fourth, two houses.  At the fifth, three houses and a dwelling in Mulberry alley.  The five fires were raging in different parts of the city at the same time, producing the utmost consternation, as the belief was general that it was the work of incendiaries.  The loss must be immense, although no correct estimate can be made at present.  Fortunately, there was no wind, or else half the city would now be a mass of smouldering ruins.  The flames are completely subdued.

 

Married on Thursday the 23d of March last, by M. Nichols, jr., Esq., Mr. Joseph Lanich to Miss Constant Orr, all of Lawrence township.

 

Died on Tuesday, the 4th inst., in Lawrence township, Mrs. Jane Caldwell, aged about 82 years.  The deceased was one of the early settlers in this county.

 

Died on Tuesday, the 4th inst., in Lawrence township, John Lawrence, youngest son of Louis C. and Susannah Cardon, aged about 9 months.

 

Died on Sunday, 26th ult., in Lawrence tp., Louisa, only child of Matthew S. and Mary J. Ogden.

 

Died on Saturday, the 9th inst., in this Borough ----, youngest child of Joseph and ---- Burchfield. (no names given)

 

Died on Wednesday morning, the 5th inst., in Lawrence tp., Mrs. ----, consort of Andrew Pond. (no name given)

 

April 25, 1848

 

Married on Thursday the 13th inst., by James M. Shaw, Esq., Mr. John W. Kylar, to Miss Sophia Shirey, all of Bradford township.

 

Died on Saturday last, at Messrs. E. & W. F. Irwins Mills, in Lawrence township, a young man named John Harper.  The deceased, according to his own account, was born and raised in Kentucky, near the Tennessee line, and was the only son and brother of a widowed mother and six sisters.  Although he suffered and died among strangers, he received every care and attention that friends could have rendered.

Kentucky and Tennessee papers please copy.

 

Elk County Land.

845 Acres of Land for sale in Gibson township, Elk county, situated near the Sinnemahoning creek, being part of tract No. 5424, warranted in the name of George Mead.  About 400 acres of this tract is good farm land, and the balance is valuable on account of the Pine Timber on it.

            The owner, who resides in Philadelphia, Mr. Price J. Patton, is anxious to dispose of it, and will sell it low.  The undersigned is authorized to sell it, to whom application can be made for terms, either at Clearfield, or (on court weeks) at Ridgeway.  G. R. Barrett, Agent.

 

Fire! – The barn of Peter Barger, of Bradford township, was consumed by fire one night last week.  A young horse, two or three calves, a wind-mill, and other farming utensils, were also destroyed.  It is supposed to have been the work of an incendiary, and “old Bill Guillam” was lodged in our jail yesterday on suspicion thereof.

 

 

May 4, 1848

 

Married on Monday the 24th April, by the Rev. P. McEnally, Mr. George Washington Welsh, of Blair county, to Miss Caroline Johnson, of Clearfield county.

 

Married on Thursday the 27th ult., by Rev. P. McEnally, Mr. John McMurray to Mrs. Jane Haggerty, both of Clearfield county.

 

Married on Sunday the 23d ult., by the Rev. Thomas M. Bryan, Mr. Thomas Morgan, to Miss Rachel Kephart, all of this county.

 

Married on Thursday the 20th ult., by the Rev. P. P. Lane, Mr. Robert Shaw, of Goshen township, to Miss Mary Cupler, of Pike township.

 

Letter of Administration have been granted to John Stites, on the estate of Joseph Heise, late of Girard township, dec’d.

 

Letter of Administration have been granted to John Stites, on the estate of Henry Kyler, late of Girard township, dec’d.

 

Estate of Philip Arnold, dec’d.

Notice is herby given that letters  testamentary have been granted to the undersigned on the estate of Philip Arnold, late of Pike township, Clearfield county, dec’d.  David Arnold and George Ross, Ex’rs.

 

May 14, 1848

 

Married on Thursday the 4th inst., by J. L. Cuttle, Esq., Mr. Samuel Davis, of Beccaria tp., to Miss Catharine Pearce, of Bradford township.

 

Married on Thursday the 4th inst., by Josiah Evans, Esq., Mr. Robert R. Welsh, formerly of Clinton county, to Miss Henrietta Lanich, of this place.

 

Died at East Freedom, Blair county, Pa., March 22d, 1848, of consumption, Mrs. Rebecca, consort of Dr. Abraham T. Schryver, aged 37 years, daughter of John Weld, Sr., of Beccaria tp., Clearfield county.

 

Died on Wednesday morning, the 10th inst., Virginia, only child of Charles and Drucilla Miller.

 

May 26, 1848

 

Married on Thursday the 11th instant by Wm. Alexander, Esq., Mr. Wm. Irwin, of Lawrence, to Miss Louisa Litz, of Boggs township.

 

Married on Thursday the 11th instant, by J. C. Cuttle, Esq., Mr. – Flegal, of Goshen, to Miss Elizabeth D--, of Brady township. (paper torn on the edge)

 

Married on Tuesday the 9th inst., by Rev. P. P. Lane, Mr. Frederick Arnold, to Miss Elizabeth G----lander, both of Brady township. (paper torn on the edge)

 

Died on the 15th inst., in this place, E. C. daughter of A. M. and Jane Hills, aged – months and 15 days. (paper torn on the edge)

 

List of letters remaining in the Post Office at Clearfield, Pa., April 1st, 1848

Dundy Amor, Barnard Adams, Charles Anderson, Adams Buds, Henry R. Boyer, John Bruner, Jacob Crowell, George Dixon, Jacob Dorish, T. H. Fulton (2), John Fenton, Michael Frank, Rev. J. A. Gallaher, Catharine Hoyt, James Irwin, Samuel Jordan, Isaac Kirk, Ann Larrin, Micheal Madden, William Mapes, Mary Ann Reams, Wm. L. Reishel, Clarissa Rell, Daniel Stuckman, John P. Warden, J. W. Wright.

 

June 3, 1848

 

Tremendous Storm.

On Monday evening last, one of the most terrific storms, accompanied with rain and hail, passed over this place, that we ever witnessed.  A few miles north of us, along the head-waters of all the streams that flow into the river from the north, between Curwensville and Karthaus, it must have borne the character of a water spout, as all those streams, Andersons creek, Montgomery, Moose, Wolfrun, Lick run, Trout run, Surveror’s run, Deer creek, Sandy, &c., were, some of them, higher than ever they were known to be before – sweeping off bridges, &c., in every direction.

 

Horses Drowned and Narrow Escape. 

On Tuesday morning last, a citizen of Covington township, named Everhart, in attempting to ford the river at the mouth of Deer creek, with his two horses and wagon, was swept off, and after drifting down the river to what is known as Shawbell’s landing – a distance of between one and two miles – the man was rescued alive, but both horses were dead.

 

June 24, 1848

 

Fatal Accident

On Saturday last James Lord, a citizen of Beccaria township, was instantly killed whilst at work in his clearing, by the top of a tree which he was chopping down, falling on him.  The deceased was young, just beginning in the world, with fair prospects and buoyant hopes, was much esteemed, and leaves a young widow with an infant child.

 

Married on Thursday the 15th inst., by the Rev. P. P. Lane, Mr. Henry Grub, of Jefferson co., to Miss Elizabeth Kuntz, of Brady township.

 

Died on Monday last, in Lawrence township, after years of affliction, Thomas Spackman, aged about 40 years.

 

July 1, 1848

 

Married on Thursday, the 29th inst., by M. Nichols, jr., Esq., Mr. George W. Turner, to Miss Sarah Radebach, of this place.

 

Married on Thursday, the 29th inst., by M. Nichols, jr., Esq., Mr. Arnold Buck to Miss Nancy V. Weldon, both of Bradford townsip.

 

 

July 11, 1848

 

Married on Thursday the 29th ult., by B. F. Sterling, Esq., Mr. Lewis Iddings, M.D., to Mrs. Mary Passmore, of Penn township.

 

Married on Tuesday evening, the 4th inst., by J. L. Cuttle, Esq., Mr. James Galer, of Jordon tp., to Miss Nancy McLaughlin, of Lawrence township.

 

Married on Sunday, the 9th inst., by W. Alexander, Esq., Mr. James M. Williams, to Miss Mary Cole, of Lawrence tp.

 

August 4, 1848

 

Married on the 13th July, by M. Nichols, jr., Esq., Mr. John Shaw, jr., to Miss Delila Lanich, all of Lawrence township.

 

Caution.  All  persons are hereby cautioned against buying or selling or in any way meddling with the following property now in the care of Wm. Reed, of Ferguson township, Clearfield co., as the same belongs to me, viz: One Black Horse & Two Red Cows, one a muley.  Henry Hegarty.

 

August 11, 1848

 

Married on Thursday morning last, by the Rev. Samuel Miller, Mr. William F. Irwin, (merchant of this place) to Miss Susan Antes, of Lawrence township.

 

Register’s Notice.

The following accounts have been examined and passed by me, and remain filed of record in this office for the inspection of heirs, legatees, creditors, and all others in any way interested, and will be presented to the next Orphan’s Court of the county of Clearfield, to be held at the court house in Clearfield on Tuesday the 5th day of September next, for allowance and confirmation:  Wm. C. Welch, Register.

  1. The administration account of Jonathan Boynton, surviving administrator of the estate of Adam Nevling, late of Beccaria township, deceased.
  2. The administration account of Peter Arnold and John Hollipeter, executors of the last will and testament of John Pentz, late of Brady township, deceased.
  3. The administration account of David Butler, administrator of the estate of Henry Fey, late of Brady township, deceased.
  4. The account of Henry B. Wright, guardian of William Nevling and Susanna Nevling, children of Adam Nevling, deceased.

 

September 9, 1848

 

Married on the 24th ult., by the Rev. P. P. Lane, Mr. Peter Laborde to Miss Phebe G--nger both of Brady township.

 

Married on Thursday last by the Rev. J. P. McAnnally, Mr. John W. Shugart to Miss Mary Beyer, both of this place.

 

 

September 20, 1848

 

Married on Thursday, the 14th inst., by Wm. Alexander, Esq., Mr. Abraham Hess, Sr., of Boggs township, to Miss Mary Butler, of Lawrence township.

 

To Contractors.

Proposals will be received by the Commissioner’s of Clearfield county, at their office in the borough of Clearfield, on Friday the 13th of October next, for doing the following work, viz:

For making 345 feet of fence around the court house lot, said fence to be put up with good sawed Locust or Chestnut posts, about four feet high, and good sawed rails about 6 inches broad.  The posts & rails to be planed and painted on each side. – A gate to be put in front of the court house and one in front of the Commissioners office.  Proposals will be received for planting said lot with good shade trees.

Also

Proposals will be received at the same time and place for building a Back House on the court house lot, about 12 feet by 8, with six apartments, (one to be a water closet) to be finished in a workmanlike manner, painted, and good locks, &c., put on the doors.

Commissioners: Ab’m Kylar, Jas. A. Reed, J. S. Elder.

 

September 27, 1848

 

Married on Tuesday 19th inst., by the Rev. John White, Mr. Thomas H. Spence, of Barnett township, Jefferson county, to Miss Mercy B. Mead, of Lawrence township, Clearfield county.

 

Married on the 17th inst., in Bradford township, by S. C. Thompson, Esq., Mr. George Nearhood to Miss Lavinah Hubler.

 

Relic of the War.

Santa Anna’s liquor canteen is now in possession of Mr. McBride of this city.  It is made from the horn of a Mexican ox. Is about two feet high, and is beautifully mounted with silver.  When found in Santa Anna’s tent at Cerro Gorde, it was filled with brandy. – Neal’s Phila Gazette.

 

 

October 12, 1848

 

A Melancholy Case.

Sometime in July last a little daughter of Mrs. Williams, of Laporte, Sullivan county, Pa., disappeared and was lost in the wilderness in that county.  On the 16th instant, some of the remains were accidentally found about a mile and a half north of Laporte.  The clothes were identified by the mother.

 

 

October 20, 1848

 

Married on the 5th of October, by the Rev. Thomas M. Bryan, Mr. Abraham Goss, to Miss Sarah Mays all of Decatur township, Clearfield county.

 

October 27, 1848

 

Married in Ridgway, Elk county, Pa., on the 17th inst., by George Dickinson, Esq., Mr. John Patterson to Miss Eliza Luthers, formerly of this county.

 

Executor’s Notice

Notice is hereby given that letters testamentary have been granted to the undersigned Executor of the last will and testament of William Hartshorn, late of Pike township, Clearfield county, deceased, and that accordingly all persons indebted to said estate are requested to make settlement without delay, and those having claims against the same will present them duly authenticated for settlement.  Robert Ross, Ex’r.

 

November 3, 1848

 

Married in Morris township, on the 1?, inst., by S. C. Thompson, Esq., Mr. Andrew Po----, to Miss Catharine Stuck, formerly of Clinton county. (Paper torn on the edge)

 

Died at Curwensville, on the 9th ult. William Hartshorne, aged about 45 years.

 

Died on the 21st ult., at Curwensville, John ---win, (merchant) in the fifty third year of his ---. (paper torn on the edge.)

 

 

November 15, 1848

 

Letter of Administration having been granted to Enoch B. Wetzel and Henry Wetzel, on the estate of Rhinehart Wetzel, late of Bell township, Clearfield county, dec’d.

 

Married on the 2d inst., by the Rev. P. P. Lane, George W. Elder, Esq., of Bell township, to Miss Emily H., daughter of B Bonsall, Esq., of Brady township.

 

Married on the 9th inst., in Bradford township, by Rev. P. McEnally, Mr. Samuel Clark Patchen to Miss Hester Graham, all of this county.

 

 

November 23, 1848

 

The public are hereby cautioned not to trust my son (John Barmoy, jr.) on my account, as I will pay no more debts of his contracting.  John Barmoy, Sr., Covington township.

 

 

December 14, 1848

 

Married on Sunday the 3d inst., by J. L. Cuttle, Esq., Mr. James Nelson, of Girard tp., to Miss Susanna Graham, of Bradford township.

 

Married on Thursday the 7th inst., by J. L. Cuttle, Esq., Mr. George R. Kline, of Goshen tp., to Miss Jemima Kline, of Lawrence tp.

 

Died at his residence in Curwensville, on Tuesday last, after an illness of several weeks, James A. Cathcart, aged about 38 years.

 

 

December 21, 1848

 

Died at his residence in Lawrence township, after a lingering illness of consumption, Franklin Lawhead, aged 36 years.

 

Married on Thursday Dec. 14th, by Rev. Miles T. Merwin, Mr. Alexander Reed, to Miss Isabella, eldest daughter of Samuel Clyde, all of Lawrence township.

 

Married on Thursday Dec. 14th, by John W. Wright, Esq., Mr. Jeremiah Cooper, to Miss Mary M. Keaggy, all of Beccaria township.

 

 

December 28, 1848

 

Notice.

Whereas, By an article of agreement made and concluded between George Conoway, sen., and his son Israel Conoway, of Karthaus township, Clearfield county, on the 15th day of November, A.D., 1848, the said Geo. Conoway, sen., conveys all his right, title, interest and claim, to all his (the said George’s) real and personal property, (excepting one Cow) to the said Israel Conoway, during his natural life, in consideration that he, the said Israel shall keep & Maintain the said George Conoway, sen., and his wife Catharine, as long as they both shall live.  In Witness: Geo. Conoway, sen.