CHAPTER XXVI

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES— BINGHAM AND HARRISON TOWNSHIPS

BINGHAM. TOWNSHIP

ZERA O. BACON, farmer, P.O. Genesee Fork, was born in Wellsville, N.Y., March 12, 1837, a son of Ira and Naomi (Bennett) Bacon, who settled in Bingham township in 1843, on the farm now occupied by Zera O., where they died. They had eleven children, viz.: Franklin, Emily (Mrs. James Briggs), Henry, Feedus, Barbara (Mrs. Asahel Lewis), Zera O., Willard, David, Amanda (Mrs. Henry Silvus), Ira and John. Zera O. Bacon was reared in Bingham township from the age of six years, and has lived on the old homestead, most of which he cleared and improved. He married Lucinda, daughter of George and Angeline (Porter) Keech, of Madison county, N.Y., and they have five children, viz.: Jennie (Mrs. Simeon Boon) Wallace, Bessie, Lizzie and Ira. Mr. Bacon is a Republican in politics, and is a representative farmer and citizen.

ABEL BISHOP, farmer, P.O., Genesee Fork, was born in Cattaraugus county, N.Y., November 28, 1842 a son of George W. and Cyrene (Wedge) Bishop. He was reared in his native county, and in 1869 settled in Bingham township, where he has since resided. He was twice married, his first wife being Angeline, daughter of Caleb and Angeline (Wilson) Lewis, of Independence, N.Y., and grand-daughter of Abram Lewis, a pioneer of that township. They had two children, Bertha (Mrs. Dennis Hill) and Fred. Mr. Bishop's second wife was Mary, daughter of William and Lucy (Howe) Spencer, of Bingham township. Mr. Bishop is a representative farmer and citizen; in politics he is a Republican.

ASAHEL H. BRIGGS, farmer, clergyman and dealer in agricultural implements, P.O. North Bingham was born inBingham township, Potter Co., Penn., February 19, 1840, a son of Ebenezer P. and Lydia (Matteson) Briggs, his father a native of Dutchess county, N.Y., and his mother of Madison county, N.Y. His paternal grandfather was Job Briggs, formerly of Dutchess county, N.Y., and among the pioneers of Bingham township. He was a farmer and mechanic and resided in the township until his death. Four of his sons were pioneers of Bingham township, named as follows: David S., Ebenezer P., Vose P. and Uriah S. His father Ebenezer P., settled in Bingham township in 1826, and cleared and improved the farm now owned by his sons A.H. and J.M., and Eli Hall. He drew the lumber for his first residence twenty-two miles with an ox team. His children were four in number, as follows: Martin D., James M., Emily (Mrs. L.E. McCarn) and Asahel H. A.H. Briggs was reared in his native township, and now occupies a part of the old homestead. He was ordained a minister of the Christian Church, and has been a member of the Advent Christian Conference of Northern Pennsylvania since its organization in 1871. He married, July 3, 1858, Sarah M., daughter of John and Thankful (Turner) Potter, of Independence, N.Y., and they have two children: Ione G. and Martin G. Mr. Briggs is a representative citizen of the county. Politically he is an advocate of Prohibition.

CHARLES M. BURT, farmer, P.O. North Bingham, was born in Ulysses, Potter Co., Penn., September 4, 1846, a son of Titus W. and Elizabeth (Lewis) Burt. His paternal grandfather was Anson I. Burt, a native of the Mohawk Valley, N.Y., and among the pioneers of Ulysses township, where he cleared and improved a farm on which he lived and died. His wife was Betsey Blackmer, by whom he had the following children: Sally (Mrs. William Canfleld), James, William, Laura, Betsey (Mrs. Charles Monroe), Titus and Kate (Mrs. Thomas Parker). The maternal grandfather was Seth Lewis, also a pioneer of Ulysses. Titus W. Burt was a native of Broome county, N.Y., and was reared in Ulysses from nine years of age. He cleared and improved a farm there and is now a resident of Lewisville. He served one term as member of the assembly from this district, and is a prominent citizen. His children are Charles M., Anson S., Marion (Mrs. Charles E. Hosley), Clarence E., Arthur S, Kate (Mrs. John F. Stone). Charles M. Burt was reared in Ulysses, and after attaining his majority engaged in farming for himself. In 1869 he located in Bingham township on the farm he now occupies, part of which he cleared and made all the improvements in the erection of present buildings. In June, 1867, he married Kate, daughter of Isaac and Nancy (Colvin) Jones, early settlers of Bingham township, and they have two children, Titus M. and Carl C. Mr. Burt is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Politically he is a Democrat and an advocate of Prohibition.

IRA. B. CARPENTER, farmer, P.O. Bingham Centre, was born in Dryden, Tompkins Co., N.Y., March 27, 1823, a son of Barber and Eleanor (Bronson) Carpenter, natives of Massachusetts, who settled in Bingham township in 1838, on the farm now owned and occupied by our subject, and resided in the township until their death. They had eleven children who grew to maturity: Theodorus, William, Melissa (Mrs. Peter Teeter), Selden, Mary (Mrs. Francis Drake), Bethiah (Mrs. Amos R. Lewis), Matilda (Mrs. G.W. Lewis), Arvilla (Mrs. Alonzo Mudge), Irena (Mrs. Wm. Knapp), Ira B. and Cordelia (Mrs. S.K. Niles). Ira B. Carpenter was sixteen years of age when he came to Bingham township, and he now occupies the old homestead of his father, which he assisted in clearing and improving. He was married September 8, 1845, to Mary A., daughter of David and Margaret (Gibson) Baldwin, of Hector, this county, by whom he had six children who grew to maturity: Selden, Sarah (Mrs. Dr. E.S. Mattison), Eugene, Roselle, Elma (Mrs. Chas. Allen) and Della (Mrs. Fowler Lewis). Mr. Carpenter was in the Civil war, drafted September 29, 1864, and was assigned to Company D, Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was honorably discharged June 16, 1865. He has been justice of the peace of Bingham township twenty-four years, and has held other minor offices. His commissions for the office of justice have been signed by five different governors for five successive terms. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. In politics he is a Republican.

GAYLORD E. COLVIN, farmer, P.O. North Bingham, was born in Bingham township, Potter Co., Penn., January 11, 1854, a son of George W. and Adelia (Nichols) Colvin. His paternal grandparents were Joshua and Dorothea (Castler) Colvin, who settled in Bingham township in 1833, and cleared and improved a farm. They afterward removed to Cook county, Ill., where they died. His maternal grandparents were Samuel and Nabby (Chase) Nichols, pioneers of Eldred, McKean Co., Penn. George W. Colvin was reared in Bingham township from nine years of age. He cleared and improved the farm now occupied by G.E. Colvin, and for a number of years was engaged in lumbering in Sharon township, Potter county. He is now a resident of North Bingham. He held the office of commissioner of Potter county two terms, and is a respected and prominent citizen. His children were Ann (Mrs. William G. Raymond) and Gaylord E. The latter resides on and conducts the old homestead. He married, October 10, 1877, Hattie, daughter of Harmon P. and Jane (Millard) Matson, of Woodhull, Steuben Co., N.Y. Mr. Colvin is a representative young farmer of Bingham township, and in politics he is a Republican.

AUSTIN C. CRUM, farmer, P.O. West Bingham, was born in Caroline, Tompkins Co., N.Y., September 18, 1826, a son of Lyman and Bathsheba (Stevens) Crum. His father, who was a farmer, cooper and carpenter, settled in Bingham township in 1840, where he resided until his death. He had a family of nine children: Lyman R.S., Lillis (Mrs. Orrin Ennis), Sally (Mrs. Henry Wilmuth), Harriet (Mrs. G.M. Perry), Clark, Julia (Mrs. Moses Hackett), Truman, Waite and Austin C. The last named was thirteen years of age when he came with his father to Bingham township. He cleared a part of the farm he now occupies and part of another. In 1847 he married Mary, daughter of Dexter and Alma (Bronson) Barnes, of Bingham township, and to them have been born four children: Mary D. (Mrs. John E. Harvey), Clark, Cirelda (Mrs. Sylvester Sherman) and Morris D. Mr. Crum is a well-known and respected citizen. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics he is a Republican, and has held the office of school director.

JOHN DANIELS, miller, P.O. Ulysses, was born in Bingham township, Potter Co., Penn., August 8, 1842, a son of George W. and Achsah (Hawley) Daniels, who settled in that township in 1827. He was reared in his native township, where for many years, he was engaged in farming. He had been following his present business two years, and operates the oldest grist-mill in Potter county. He was a soldier in the war of the Rebellion, enlisting in Company I, One Hundred and Eighty-ninth New York Infantry, and served one year, when he was honorably discharged. He married Maria, daughter of Ephraim Utter, of Tioga county, Penn.

WILLIAM DANIELS was born in Bingham township, Potter Co., Penn., December 12, 1844, a son of George W. and Achsah (Hawley) Daniels, who settled in that township in 1827. His maternal grandfather was Solomon Hawley, a native of Connecticut, who settled in Bingham township in 1827. William Daniels was reared in his native township, and April 1, 1862, enlisted in Company F, Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was wounded at the battle of Chapin' s Farm; September 29, 1864, and was honorably discharged from the service April 20, 1865. After the war he engaged in farming in Bingham township, which he followed up to 1880. He then embarked in the grocery business at Lewisville with G.H. Cobb, and a year later purchased his partner' s interest, conducting the business alone for a short time, when he sold out. He then opened a clothing store in same town, the first exclusive establishment of the kind in the place, which he conducted two years. He then traveled for an Elmira commercial house for two years, and afterward again engaged in mercantile business in Lewisville for one and a half years. January 14, 1866, he married Ellen H., daughter of John and Martha (Lewis) Harris, of Lewisville, and they have two children: M. Inez and Henry H. Mr. Daniels is a well-known citizen of Potter county, and is a member of the F. & A.M. and G.A.R. In politics he is a Republican.

JEROME HARVEY, farmer, P.O. West Bingham, was born in Triangle, Broome Co., N.Y., May 11, 1825, a son of Joseph and Rhoda (Baker) Harvey, who settled in Bingham township in 1847, locating on the farm now owned and occupied by their son, Jerome, which, with his assistance, he cleared and improved. Mr. Harvey was reared in his native county, being twenty-two years of age when he accompanied his father to Potter county. He participated in the Civil war, being drafted in October, 1864, in Company D, Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was honorably discharged in September, 1865. He was twice married: His first wife was Adeline Saxton, of Broome county, N.Y., and his second wife was Cynthia Greene, of the same county. Mr. Harvey is a representative farmer and citizen of Bingham township. He has held the offices of road commissioner and school director, and has also been postmaster of West Bingham. In politics he is independent.

DAVID T. HAUBER, farmer and lumberman, P.O. North Bingham, was born in West Union, Steuben Co. N.Y., November 29, 1835, a son of John and Jane Hauber. His paternal grandfather was Frederick Hauber, and his maternal grandfather was Guy Hauber, both from the Mohawk Valley, N.Y., and among the first settlers of West Union, N.Y. David T. Hauber, was reared in his native town, began life as a farmer, and resided there up to 1870, when he removed to Bingham township, locating on the Hiram Ives farm, a good share of which he cleared, and made most of the improvements, erecting all the commodious farm buildings. He resided there until 1887, when he purchased the farm he now occupies at North Bingham, the best located and one of the finest and best farms in the township, where he has since resided. Besides the two places above mentioned, he owns the James Burt farm, a part of which he also cleared, and on which he erected a large barn, 40x50 feet in dimensions. Although not an old settler, Mr. Hauber has probably done as much toward the development of Bingham township as any other citizen, and, besides attending to his farm interests, has been engaged in lumbering more or less since 1883. He married, in 1865, Eugertha, daughter of Alvin and Alvina (Horton) Chapin, of West Union, N.Y., and they have three children: Blanche, Mary and Giles. Mr. Hauber was in the Civil war, enlisting August 22, 1862; he became corporal in Company H, One Hundred and Forty-first New York Volunteer Infantry, was promoted to second sergeant, and honorably discharged June 26, 1865. He is a prominent and progressive farmer, is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the Grand Army of the Republic and of the Masonic fraternity. He has been supervisor and school director of the township for nine years. Politically he is a Republican.

JOHN HENRY, farmer, P.O. Ulysses, was born in Luzerne county, Penn., December 31, 1818, a son of Christian and Barbara (Whaner) Henry, who settled in Bingham township in 1842, remained there about three years, and then removed to Livingston county, N.Y., where he died in 1846, his wife surviving him till the year 1886, when she died at the residence of her son, John Henry, in Bingham township, Potter Co., Penn. John Henry settled in Bingham township in 1842, and cleared and improved the farm he now occupies. He was married, December 8, 1844, to Susan A., daughter of Joshua and Polley (Rome) Thompson, who settled in Bingham township in 1824. By this union there were five children born: George, Andrew J., Charles, Betsey (Mrs. J.C. Hawley) and Caroline (Mrs. James E. Mulford). Mr. Henry is a prominent citizen of Bingham township, is a member of the Free Will Baptist Church;. he is a Democrat, and has held the offices of supervisor and school director.

ASAHEL B. HOWE, farmer, P.O. Spring Mills, N.Y., was born in Lansing, Tompkins Co., N.Y., May 30, 1816, a son of Isaac and Betsey (Buck) Howe, who located in Bingham township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1832, and a year later settled on the farm now occupied by Asahel B., which, with the assistance of their sons was cleared and improved, and here the parents lived until their death. Timothy Howe, paternal grandfather of subject, was a pioneer of the Mohawk Valley, N.Y., a soldier of the Revolution, and an early settler of Lansing, N.Y., where he resided until his death. His maternal grandfather, Benjamin Buck, was also a pioneer of Lansing, N.Y. A.B. Howe is a prominent and well-known citizen of Bingham township, having resided on the old homestead since 1833.

RUFUS H. HOWE, farmer and merchant, P.O. Bingham Centre, was born in Lansing, Tompkins Co., N.Y., January 7, 1823, a son of Isaac and Betsey (Buck) Howe, who settled in Bingham township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1832, on the farm now owned by Asahel B. and Laverne Howe, which, with the assistance of their sons, they cleared and improved, making it their home until death. Their children were Asahel B., Simeon P.B., Lucy (Mrs. Wm. Spencer), Rufus H., Susan (Mrs. Martin V. Briggs), William, Nelson (who died of disease contracted in the army), Jane A. and Sally A. Rufus H. Howe was reared in Bingham township from nine years of age. In the fall of 1844 he purchased the farm he now occupies, and has cleared, and improved it besides other farms, in the vicinity. He has worked at the carpenter's trade more or less since he was seventeen years of age, and has erected a great many buildings in Bingham, also in Independence, N.Y. For a number of years he operated a saw-mill and manufactured considerable lumber. He was a soldier in the Civil war, having been drafted February 21, 1865, and went out with Company E, Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania Veterans. He was at the front before Petersburg, witnessed Lee' s surrender, and was honorably discharged July 8, 1865. He was twice married; his first wife was Caroline, daughter of Herman and Betsey (Lewis) Ainsworth, of Independence, N.Y., by whom he had two children: Clinton E. and Alice C. (Mrs. John Holbert), His present wife was Luthera Bishop, of Independence, N.Y. Mr. Howe engaged in the mercantile business at Bingham Centre, before the war, which he has since continued. He is a member of the First Baptist Church of Bingham. In politics he is a Republican.

LEVI B. LEWIS, farmer, P.O. Bingham Centre, was born in Bingham township, September 4, 1836, a son of Amos R. and Bethiah (Carpenter) Lewis. who settled in Bingham township in 1834, locating on the farm now owned by David T. Hauber, a part of which they cleared and improved. In 1839 they settled at Bingham Centre and cleared and improved the farm now occupied by Levi B., where the father died in December, 1873, in the sixty-eighth year of his age. They had six children who grew to maturity, viz.: Lurinda (Mrs. Russell Grover), Alvin P., Levi B., Elonzo, Oscar and Rachel (Mrs.Jared Thompson). Levi B. Lewis was reared in his native township, and has always followed farming as an occupation. He was a soldier in the Civil war, enlisting March 31, 1864, in Company G, Fifty-third Pennsylvania Regiment; was in the battle of the Wilderness, and was wounded at Spottsylvania, May 12, 1864, where he was taken prisoner and sent to Libby prison; was paroled August 24, 1864, exchanged at Annapolis, and rejoined his regiment in November, 1864. He was honorably discharged June 16, 1865. Mr. Lewis was married May 9, 1859, to Sarah, daughter of George and Eliza (Burt) Ransow, of Bingham township, and they have three children: Frank, Fowler and Selden. Mr. Lewis has been postmaster of Bingham Centre since 1872, succeeding his father, who had held the office for twenty years. He is a member of the G.A.R. and I.O.O.F; is one of the auditors of Potter county, to which office he was elected in 1887, and has held the office of township clerk seventeen years. In politics he is a Democrat.

SAMUEL MUNROE, farmer, P.O. Ulysses, was born in Washington county, N.Y., September 16, 1815, a son of Garner and Rosanna (McAllister) Munroe, who settled in Tioga county, Penn., in 1821. Samuel Munroe was reared in Tioga county, Penn., from the age of six years. He settled in Bingham township, Potter county, in 1839, and in 1842 located on the farm he now occupies, most of which he cleared and improved, and where he has since resided. He has been married twice. His, first wife was Mariam, daughter of John and Susanna (Salisbury) Howland, of Tioga county, Penn., and his second and present wife is Susan, sister of his first. Mr. Munroe's uncle, Ashbel Munroe, settled in Bingham township in 1826, cleared and improved the Ferris farm, and died there. He had two daughters. Mr. Munroe is a prominent and successful farmer, and has served one term as commissioner of Potter county. Politically he is a Republican.

JOEL L. RAYMOND, farmer, P.O. North Bingham, was born in Hinsdale, Berkshire Co., Mass., March 2, 1816, a son of William G. and Betsey (Freeland) Raymond, who settled in Bingham township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1837, and died there. They had a family of nine children: Maria (Mrs. Lyman Blackmer), Persus J. (Mrs. Squire Rightmyer), William P., Joel L., Hannah M. (Mrs. John Robbins), Mary C. (Mrs. Ebenezer Huntington), John G., Julia A. (deceased wife of John Smith, also deceased) and Eliza (Mrs. Charles Grover).

Joel L. was reared in Berkshire, Tioga Co., N.Y., and settled in Bingham township in 1837. He cleared and improved a farm of 200 acres, besides other farms, and has resided at North Bingham since 1876. His paternal grandfather, Amos Raymond, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and a pioneer of Allegheny township, this county, where he died at the advanced age of ninety-six years. Joel L. Raymond was twice married. His first wife was Jane Searles of Tioga county, N.Y., and his second wife was Lydia M., daughter of David and Lydia (Lyman) Grover, of Bingham township, by whom he had eight children: Jane (Mrs. Norman W. Lewis), Minerva (Mrs. L.P. Lewis), Louis (Mrs. A.H. Cobb), William G., Pauline (Mrs. E.W. Reynolds), Ruth (Mrs. George Cobb), John L. and Grace (Mrs. N.J. Peck). Mr. Raymond is a member of the Baptist Church. He is a prominent and leading citizen, is a Democrat, and has served one term as treasurer of Potter county. He is descended from an old American family, his paternal grandfather having fought at White Plains, Stony Point, and assisted in the capture of Gen. Burgoyne. The parents of Joel L. Raymond were married by Rev. John Leeland, of Massachusetts.

AMASA ROBBINS, retired, P.O. Genesee Fork, was born in Marcellus, N.Y., December 2, 1807, a son of David and Mercy (Burleigh) Robbins, who settled in Independence, N.Y., in 1825. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and died in Bingham township; his family consisted of nine children, as follows: Marcia (Mrs. Comfort Felt), Amasa, Phebe (Mrs. Ephraim Slade), Almira (Mrs. Clark Lewis), David, John, James G., Laban and Ira. Amasa Robbins settled in Bingham township in 1834, locating on the farm now owned by M.D. Briggs, part of which .he cleared and improved. He then settled on what is known as the Parker farm, clearing forty acres there, and in 1857 located on the farm he now occupies, all of which he cleared and improved, and where he has since resided. He was married October 12, 1830, to Electa, daughter of John G. and Phebe R. (Slocum) Huyler, of Tioga county, Penn. John G. Huyler was a soldier in the Revolution. Mr. and Mrs. Robbins have had six children named as follows: Mercy C. (Mrs. Edgar Peet), Eliza J. (Mrs. Dwight Genung), Zilipha A., James B., Rachel (Mrs. Alonzo Race) and Hannah E. (Mrs. David Peet). Mr. Robbins chopped 116 acres of timber by the job, before he was married, and as much more since. He is one of the oldest citizens of the township. In. politics he is a Democrat.

ORA THOMPSON, farmer, P; O. Bingham Centre, was born in New Jersey, April 16, 1818, a son of Joshua and Polly (Romer) Thompson, who settled in Bingham township in 1824, locating on the farm now owned by Wilson Gee, which they cleared and improved, and resided in the township until their death. They had a family of eight children: Maria (Mrs. Ichabod Graham), Ora, Sally (Mrs. Sidney Abbott), Alvah, Susan A. (Mrs. John Henry), Wilbert, Clark and Milton. Ora Thompson was reared in Bingham township from the age of six years. In 1839 he settled on the farm he now occupies, all of which he cleared and improved. In 1845 he married Julia, daughter of Ezekiel and Mary (Cartwright) Lane, and to them have been born eight children: Levi J., Mary A. (Mrs. A. C. Evans), Angelia (Mrs. L. Merritt), Melissa (Mrs. Charles Henry), Byron, Lottie (Mrs. Wm. Sherman), Chandler and Grant. Mr. Thompson is one of the oldest residents of Bingham township, and is a prominent farmer. Politically he is a Republican.

LEVI J. THOMPSON, farmer, P.O. Bingham Centre, was born in Bingham township, September 19, 1845, a son of Ora and Julia (Lane) Thompson. His paternal grandfather was Joshua Thompson, who settled in Bingham in 1824, and his maternal grandfather was Ezekiel Lane. Levi was reared and educated in his native township, and after the breaking out of the Civil war enlisted, February 5, 1864, and, was assigned to Company G, Fifty-third Pennsylvania Regiment. He participated in the Wilderness campaign, and lost his right arm at the battle of Spottsylvania May 12, 1864. He was honorably discharged from the service January 5, 1865. He located on the farm he now occupies, in 1865, a good share of which he cleared and improved. He has been twice married. His first wife was Rachel, daughter of Amos R. and Bethiah (Carpenter) Lewis, of Bingham township, by whom he had the following children: Iva, Addie, Lula and Asa. His second wife is Ada, daughter of Benjamin R. and Lorinda (Lewis) Grover, of Bingham township, and they have four children: Lillie, Grace, Asahel and Clara. Mr. Thompson is a representative citizen, and has held several of the local offices of the township. In politics he is a Republican.

AARON S. WORDEN, P.O. Ulysses, was born April 19, 1847, in Bingham township, Potter county, on the farm he now owns and occupies, a son of Charles and Clarissa (Bice) Worden. His paternal grandfather, Benjamin Worden, formerly of Otsego county, N.Y., settled in Bingham township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1831, and made this his home until his death. His maternal grandfather, John A. Bice, settled in the same township in 1838. Charles Worden came to Bingham township when ten years of age, in 1831, and in 1842 settled on a farm now owned by his son, Aaron S., which he cleared and improved, living there until his death. His children were Erastus S. (who died in New York City at the close of the late war, of disease contracted in the army), Ephraim S., Aaron S., Charles V. (deceased), Emma (Mrs. Alonzo Howe) and Ella (Mrs. Charles Stillman, of Ulysses). A. S. Worden was reared in Bingham township, and has owned and occupied the old homestead since his marriage, September 22, 1869, to Mary A., daughter of John L. and Electa (Webster) Van Deboe, of Otsego county, N.Y. Mr. and Mrs. Worden have one daughter, M. Alma. Mr. Worden is a leading farmer and a breeder of Devon cattle and Percheron horses. Politically he is a Republican.

HARRISON TOWNSHIP

F.P. BADGERO, merchant, Mills, was born at Loon Lake, Steuben Co., N.Y., June 21, 1847, a son of Francis and Electa L. (Tompkins) Badgero, who settled in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1854. His father was a native of Livingston county, N.Y., and a carpenter by trade; was reared in his native county, and when four years of age became partially blind from cataracts. He erected many prominent cottages and buildings in Livingston and Ontario counties, N.Y., which were marvels to those who knew him and of his affliction. He was for many years a resident of Steuben county, N.Y., but has been a resident of Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn. since 1854, where he worked at his trade more or less up to 1884, and is now conducting a small farm. Though of slight build and weighing but 136 pounds, he has performed some wonderful feats of strength, at one time lifting 2,200 pounds dead weight, on a wager of $100, winning the money. He has two children: F.P., and Mary (Mrs. John Blanchard), a music teacher. F.P. Badgero was reared in Harrison township from the age of seven years. He worked with his father for a number of years at the carpenter' s trade, and is a natural born mechanic. He has conducted a general store at Mills since 1885, and has also been engaged in farming, owning a farm of 200 acres adjoining his father's. He has been married twice. His first wife was Adelaide, daughter of Barber and Sarah (English) Phillips, by whom he has three children living: Theresa (Mrs. John Beaubien), Eva and Clara. His present wife is Laura, daughter of Philip and Elizabeth (Boucher) Sanders, of West Union, N.Y. They have two children: Laura M. and Edna E. Mr. Badgero is a member of the I.O.O.F. He has been assessor of Harrison township two years, and in politics he is a Republican.

DARIUS W. COFFIN, farmer and dairyman, P.O. North Fork, was born in Brookfield township, Tioga Co., Penn., March 17, 1839, a son of John R. and Hannah J. (Nobles) Coffin. He was reared in his native township, receiving a common-school education. He was in the Civil war, enlisting March 8, 1862, in Company F, Seventy-eighth New York Volunteer Infantry, and, on account of disability, was honorably discharged from the service June 16, 1862. In 1864 he settled in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., and in 1868 located on the farm he now owns and occupies, a good share of which he has cleared and improved. In 1864 he married Matilda J., daughter of John D. and Sally A. (Marble) Snyder, of Harrison township, and they have three children; (Mrs. David Stedman), John N. and Elsie G. Mr. Coffin is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and of the Grand Army of the Republic. In politics he is a Republican.

RAY CUMMINGS, farmer, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., in June, 1852, a son of Henry and Angeline (Dodge) Cummings. His paternal grandparents were Abel and Martha Cummings, who were among the pioneers of Harrison township, clearing what is now known as the George Stevens farm; their children were Calvin, Alfred, Henry, Ezra, Samuel and Martha (Mrs. Thomas Lawton). His maternal grandparents were Israel and Sally (White) Dodge, who settled in Harrison township in 1842. Henry Cummings was a farmer by occupation. He was in the Civil war, serving three years in Company G, Forty-sixth Pennsylvania Regiment, and was killed at Peach Tree Creek, near Atlanta, Ga., April 14, 1865. He had two children, Ray being the only survivor. Ray Cummings was married to Esther, daughter of Harmon and Rose (Watrous) Swetland, of Harrison township, and they have two children, Louie L. and Henry N. Mr. Cummings has always followed agricultural pursuits, and was born and reared on the farm he now occupies. In politics he is a Republican.

MARTIN DODGE, farmer, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born in Oxford, Chenango Co., N.Y., January 30, 1831, a .son of Israel and Sally (White) Dodge, who settled in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1842. He was reared in Harrison township, where he received a common school education. He was in the Civil war, enlisting in August, 1862, in Company D, One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Pennsylvania Regiment, and was honorably discharged at the expiration of nine months' service. March 30, 1864, he enlisted in Company D, Fifty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. In 1863 he settled on the farm he now owns and occupies, on which he made a start prior to his second enlistment, and has since cleared the same and made all the improvements in buildings, etc. He was married, June 17, 1863, to Jane, daughter of Isaac Horton, of Tioga county, Penn. Mr. Dodge is a prominent and representative farmer and citizen of Harrison township, has served one term as treasurer of Potter county, and has filled several of the local offices of the township. He is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

A.F. DODGE, lumberman, merchant and farmer, P.O. Elmer, was born in New York State, December 3, 1834, a son of Israel and Sally (White) Dodge, who settled in Harrison township in 1842, He was reared in that township from the age of seven years. In 1857 he settled on the farm he now occupies, a part of which he cleared, and made most of the improvements in buildings. Since attaining his majority he has been engaged in lumbering, and is prominently identified with the lumber interests of Potter county, being junior member of the firm of Manning & Dodge, general merchants, at Elmer. Mr. Dodge married, in 1859, Louisa, daughter of Sylvanus and Sally (White) Moore, of Oxford, Chenango Co., N.Y., and they have one daughter, Hattie. Mr. Dodge is a representative and leading citizen of Harrison township. He has held the office of supervisor twenty years, and is now serving his third term as school director. Politically he is a Republican, and has been postmaster at Elmer since 1880.

VINCENT DODGE, farmer, P.O. Elmer, was born in Addison, N.Y., December 18, 1840, a son of Israel and Sally (White) Dodge, natives of Chenango county, N.Y, who settled in Harrison township, in 1842, on the farm adjoining that now owned by our subject, which they cleared and improved, and made their home until death. They had nine children, viz.: Angeline (Mrs. Henry Cummings), Martin, A. Franklin, Elizabeth (Mrs. Horatio Aldrich), James, Vincent, Clarissa (Mrs. John Champlin), Annis (Mrs. Eugene Stevens) and Eugene. Vincent Dodge was reared in Harrison township. He was in the Civil war, enlisting in Company D, One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers, in August, 1862; served nine months, and was honorably discharged. He was afterward drafted into Company D, Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, in which he also served nine months. In August, 1862, he married Hannah, daughter of Rev. Benjamin and Catherine (Gorton) Thomas, of Harrison township, and they have one daughter, Edith. Mr. Dodge has resided on the farm he now owns since the war, and has made all improvements in buildings. He is a member of the G.A.R.; in politics he is a Republican.

CHARLES H. DOUD, carpenter, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born in Windsor, Broome Co., N.Y., May 10, 1836, a son of Russell C. and Polly (Dow) Doud, who settled in Harrison township in 1854. His father was a farmer by occupation, which he followed until 1866, and died in Susquehanna, Penn., in 1871. His children were Marilla (Mrs. Ambrose Elwell), Tryphena (Mrs. Ira Martin), Clarinda (Mrs. Jonathan Baldwin), Leander H., Sylvia (Mrs. Charles Phillips), Almira (Mrs. William Andrews), Edward and Emily (twins, the latter married to Rewland Farnham) and Charles H. The last named came with his parents to Harrison township in 1854, and has since then followed the carpenter's trade, more or less. He has also been interested in farming to some extent, and for several years was engaged in the furniture business at Harrison Valley. He was in the Civil war, enlisting, April 1, 1864, in Company D, Fifty-third Pennsylvania Regiment. He was wounded at Spottsylvania, May 12, 1864, and was honorably discharged from the service in June, 1865. He married in June, 1857, Mary, daughter of Rev. Benjamin and Catherine (Gorton) Thomas, of Harrison, and they have two children: Kate (Mrs. Chester A. Swetland) and Lapette. Mr. Doud is a representative citizen of Harrison Valley, and has been constable of the township four years, assessor three years, and is the present treasurer. He is a Republican.

JOHN B. ERWAY was born in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., May 22, 1836, a son of P.P. and Harriet (Hurlbut) Erway. His paternal. grandparents were John and Christiana M. (Arter) Erway, who settled in Harrison township in 1829, where they resided until their death. They reared the following named children: Jacob, Anna (Mrs. John Wilbur), Sally (Mrs. David McConnell), Elizabeth (Mrs. William Colvin), Julia (Mrs. Israel Merrick), Catherine (Mrs. John Rose), Pearl P., Henry and George K. The maternal grandparents of John B. Erway were Giles and Jediah (Metcalf) Hurlbut, who also settled in Harrison township in 1829. P.P. Erway was a farmer by occupation, and a pioneer of Harrison township. He reared a family of eight children: John B., Hestina (Mrs. Hamilton Warner), Elizabeth (Mrs. David Mascho), Aurilla (Mrs. Alex Logue), Caroline (Mrs. Benjamin Crandall), Oscar, Benjamin F. and Emmett. J.B. Erway was reared in his native township, where most of his life has been spent. He participated in the Civil war, enlisting in August, 1862, in Company G, One Hundred and Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers. He lost his left leg, below the knee, at Chancellorsville, May 2, 1863, and was honorably discharged from the service in September following. After his discharge he returned home, where he remained some time, and afterward went West, spending several years in the Territories, returning to Harrison township in 1883, where, with the exception of one year, he was engaged in business. His wife was Mary Fletcher, daughter of William Fletcher, of Tioga county, Penn., by whom he has had two children: Addie M. (Mrs. Ernest Edmunds) and Grace. Mr. Erway is a member of the G.A.R., and in politics he is a stanch Republican.

WILLIAM B. FOX, farmer, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born in Chemung, Chemung Co., N.Y., May 16, 1819, a son of Silas and Abigail (Brooks) Fox, who settled in Harrison township in 1856, and whose children were Aurelia (Mrs. Robinson), William B., Jesse, Fidelia (Mrs. Jones Little) and Cecelia (Mrs. Byron S. Potter) Mr. Fox settled in Harrison township in 1853, and has cleared and improved most of the farm he occupies. He was in the Civil war, enlisting in Company G, Fifty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, February 29, 1864. He was wounded at Spottsylvania, and was honorably discharged from the service May 26, 1865, at Philadelphia. He married, October 11, 1843, Cynthia S., daughter of Thomas and Tamma (Mead) Johnson, of Chemung, N.Y., and they have two children living: Chrischanna (Mrs. C.L. Stone) and George M. Mr. Fox is a representative farmer and citizen; is a Republican in politics, and has held several local offices of the township.

CHARLES A. GILBERT, lumberman, P.O. Elmer, was born in Palmyra, N.Y., September 26, 1841, a son of George and Philena (Durfee) Gilbert, who settled in Harrison township in 1852. He was reared in Steuben county, N.Y., and Potter county, Penn., his parents coming here when he was eleven years old. He was in the Civil war, enlisting September 1, 1861, in Company G, Forty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was honorably discharged, on account of disability, in December of the same year. In January, 1864, he again enlisted, this time in Company L, Fiftieth New York Engineers, and was in the following named battles: front of Petersburg, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, and others, and was honorably discharged. June 27, 1865. After the war he operated a shingle-mill at Westfield, Tioga county, one year; engaged in farming two years, and then embarked in the lumber business in Clearfield county, where he remained two years. He then engaged in farming at Clymer, Tioga county, for three years. In 1881 he embarked in the lumber business at Elmer, in which he has since successfully continued. He was married March 11, 1866, to Mary, daughter of Harvey and Sarah (Potter) Metcalf, of Westfield, Penn., and they have two children, James F. and Josie A. Mr. Gilbert is a prominent lumberman. He is a member of the G.A.R., and in politics is a Republican.

WILLIAM E. GILBERT, farmer, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born at Painted Post, N.Y., June 24, 1846, a son of George and Philena (Durfee) Gilbert, who settled in Harrison Valley in 1852. Here his father, a blacksmith by trade, resided one and a half years, when he purchased the farm now occupied by the subject of this sketch, which, with the assistance of his sons, he cleared and improved, and where he resided until his death, which occurred in 1886, when he was aged seventy-one years. He had seven children: Frank, Charles A., Edward, William E., Jay, Susie (Mrs. Andrew Wallis) and John. William E. Gilbert has always resided in Harrison township, and, with the exception of the five years he was engaged in the drug business at Harrison Valley, has followed farming; he now owns and occupies a part of the old homestead. In 1873 he married Mary, daughter of James and Sarah (Breese) Douglass of Hector township, this county, and to them has been born one son, Harry. Mr. Gilbert has held the office of town clerk of Harrison township four terms. He is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Masonic fraternity.

CHARLES P. GILL, farmer, P.O. North Fork, was born in Brookfield township, Tioga Co., Penn., August 13, 1847, a son of Nelson and Clara (Joseph) Gill. His paternal grandfather was Charles Gill, who settled at Fox Hill, in Harrison township, Potter county, in 1834, on what is now known as the A.J. Hoffman farm, which he cleared and improved, and made his home until death. His first wife was Parmelia Hurlbut, by whom he had four children: Nelson, Lamantha (Mrs. Theodore Metcalf), Molinda (Mrs. Rowland Hunt) and John. His second wife was Eliza Winchester, by whom he had five children: Charles, Frank, Parmelia (Mrs. Francis Holdridge), Lavira (Mrs. Persing) and Flora (Mrs. Ed Schutch). The paternal great-grandfather of our subject was John Gill, a native of Yorkshire, England, and a pioneer of Cortland county, N.Y. His maternal grandparents were George Joseph, a pioneer of Brookfield, Tioga Co., Penn., and Clara (Plumb) Joseph. Nelson Gill cleared and improved a farm where he died. He had two children: Charles P. and Hattie (Mrs. A.J. Hoffman). C.P. Gill was reared in Harrison township, and now owns and occupies the old homestead. He has been married twice. His first wife was Anna, daughter of Simeon B. and Mary A. (Lampman) Hauber, of Steuben county, N.Y., by whom he had two children, George and Ross. His present wife was formerly Miss Emma Hubbard, daughter of M.B. and Jemima (Cady) Hubbard, of Steuben county, N.Y. Mr. Gill is a prominent farmer and a representative citizen. He is a Democrat in politics.

BURDETT W. HARRISON, merchant, Mills, was born in Taylor, Cortland Co., N.Y., July 11, 1847, a son of Hubbard and Abbie (Rockwell) Harrison, who settled in Harrison township in 1854, on the farm they now occupy, most of which they cleared and improved. They have had nine children: Mary, John (died at Washington, D.C., of disease contracted in the Civil war), Burdett W., Henry, Ella, Leonard, Hattie (Mrs. Burdett Boyce), Cora and Etta (Mrs. Andy Gee). Burdett W. Harrison was reared in Harrison township, and has had a varied business career. He spent nineteen years of his life in Cortland and Allegany counties, N.Y., and in Tioga county, Penn., and returned to Harrison township in 1888, in the spring of which year he embarked in the grocery trade at Mills, which he has since successfully conducted. His wife was Alma, a daughter of Lewis and Keziah (Cady) Vanderburg, of Southport, N.Y., by whom he has one child, Louisa. Mr. Harrison is a member of the Baptist Church. Politically he is a Republican. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and of the E.A.U.

JAMES S. HAYNES, farmer, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born in Guilford, Chenango Co., N.Y., August 17, 1839, a son of Samuel and Eunice (Copley) Haynes, both natives of the State of New York, who settled in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1842, where the father cleared and improved the farm now occupied by James S., and on which both parents died. Their children were, Maria (Mrs. Henry Outman), Rowland V., James S. and Sarah A. (Mrs. John Olney). James S. Haynes was reared in Harrison township, receiving a common school education. He has always devoted his attention to farming, and at his father' s death succeeded him to the ownership of the homestead by purchase, and here he has a1ways resided. He was married, October 16, 1860, to Elizabeth, daughter of Willis and Julia (Yale) Spencer, of Harrison township. They have one son, Lewis E. Mr. Haynes is a representative farmer sand citizen. Politically he is a Republican, and has held several of the local offices in the township.

AUGUSTUS E. HOLCOMB, farmer, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born in Broome county, N.Y., July 30, 1836, son of Lloyd and Minerva (Cook) Holcomb, natives of Connecticut and New York, respectively, who settled in Harrison township Potter Co., Penn., in 1850, and cleared and improved most of the farm occupied by Augustus E. Holcomb, where they passed the remainder of their lives. They had three children: Walter B., Theodore F. and Augustus E. Augustus E. Holcomb was fourteen years of age when he settled with his parents in this township, and here he has since lived. He was a soldier in the Rebellion, enlisting in February, 1864, in Company G, Fifty-third Pennsylvania Regiment, and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. He married Susan, daughter of Nathan and Amanda (Hurlbut) Fletcher, of Harrison township, and to them were born three children: Nathan, Walter and Milton. Mr. Holcomb is a worthy and respected citizen. He is a member of Union, No. 522, E.A.U., and also a member of the G.A.R. Post, No. 586. Politically he is a Republican.

NEWTON W. HUBBARD, of the firm of Chapin & Hubbard, hardware dealers, Harrison Valley, was born in Tyringham, Berkshire Co., Mass., October 25, 1829, a son of Nathaniel and Sophia (Judd) Hubbard, both natives of Berkshire county, Mass., who settled in Harrison, Potter Co., Penn., in 1850, locating on the farm now occupied by their grandson, Curtis Hubbard, which they cleared and improved, and here spent the remainder of their lives. They had two children: Jane S. (Mrs. Jesse Mattison) and Newton W. Newton W. Hubbard was reared in his native county, and settled in Harrison township with his parents in 1850. He was engaged in farming for many years, and cleared and improved the farm adjoining that of his father, and erected all the buildings. He removed to Harrison Valley in 1879, where he has since resided, and in 1883 embarked in the hardware business with his son-in-law, D.D. Chapin, under the firm name of Chapin & Hubbard, in which he has since successfully continued. He was twice married. His first wife was Eleanor, daughter of Thaddeus and Diana (Gill) Stone, of Harrison township, by whom he had one son, Curtis. He was married, the second time, to Hannah S., daughter of Jesse and Caroline (Barnes) Bartoo, of Chenango county, N.Y. They have had five children: Orpha (Mrs. D.D. Chapin), Edith (Mrs. George K Stone), Amy, Sadie and Madie (twins). Mr. Hubbard was a soldier in the Civil war, enlisting in 1864 in Company I, One Hundred and Eighty-ninth New York Volunteers, was at the front, and witnessed Lee's surrender. He was honorably discharged in. June, 1865. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and politically he is a Republican.

CURTIS HUBBARD, farmer, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born in Harrison township, Potter county, May 11, 1855, a son of Newton W. and Eleanor (Stone) Hubbard. He was reared in his native township, where he has always resided, and since manhood has been engaged in farming, occupying the old family homestead. He married, November 25, 1878, Elsie, daughter of Daniel and Charlotte (Bartoo) Williams, of New York, and, they have two children, Floyd and Madge. Mr. Hubbard is a prominent and representative young farmer of Harrison township. In politics he is a Republican.

HENRY HURLBUT, farmer, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born in Broome county, N.Y., November 25, 1814, a son of Giles and Jedidah (Metcalf) Hurlbut, whosettled in Harrison township in 1828, on the farm adjoining that of Mr. Hurlbut, which they cleared and improved, and where they resided until their death. Giles Hurlbut was twice married, and by his first wife, Jedidah Metcalf, he had ten children: Robinson, Harriet (Mrs. P.P. Erway), Henry, Amanda (Mrs. Nathan Fletcher), Alvina (Mrs. Thomas Cornish), Aurilla (Mrs. Austin Buck), Lucy A. (Mrs. Almond Scoville), Hiram, Isaac and Alvah. His second wife was Maria Tuttle, by whom he had two children, Sheldon and Giles. Henry Hurlbut was fourteen years of age when he came with his parents to Harrison Valley. He has always been a farmer, and has cleared and improved the farm he now occupies. He was twice married. His first wife was Martha Southwick, by whom he had four children: George, Rosalinda (Mrs. Truman Hurlbut), William and Samantha (Mrs. Henry Gustin). His second wife was Marilla Hawley, by whom he has one daughter living, Clara V. (Mrs. Henry Rice).

CHARLES A. JONES, farmer, P.O. Mills, was born in Lyons, N.Y., September 22, 1844, a son of John E. and Esther (Palmer) Jones, who settled in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1849, and cleared and improved the farm now occupied by their son Charles A. They had ten children who grew to maturity, viz.: William, Esther (Mrs. Amos Hawkins), Amy (Mrs. Constant Bailey), Mary (Mrs. James Cotton), John J., Charles A., Lyman, Annie (Mrs. Charles Hamm), Luna (Mrs. Robert Baxter) and Myra (Mrs. Charles Shaw). Charles A. Jones was five years of age when his parents came to Harrison township, where he was reared, and has always lived on the old homestead which he now owns. He was a soldier in the Civil war, enlisting September 10, 1861, in Company H, Eighty-fifth New York Volunteers. He was taken prisoner at Plymouth, N.C., in April, 1854, and was sent to Andersonville, where he was kept nine months; then was transferred to Florence prison, where he remained three months, and while being run by the enemy to Wilmington, N.C., he was recaptured by the Union army, and was honorably discharged from the service July 12, 1835. In August, 1865, he married Lucina, daughter of Robert and Betsey (Briggs) McCurdy, of Willing, N.Y., and they have three children: Olive (Mrs. George Bartoo), Elmer and Orville. Mr. Jones is an enterprising and worthy citizen. Politically he is a Republican.

THOMAS J. KIBBE, farmer, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born in Washington county, N.Y., April 1, 1831, a son of David and Emily C. (McNutt) Kibbe, who settled in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1833, on a farm now owned by H.N. Stone, most of which they cleared and improved, and resided in the township until their death. Their children were Sally (Mrs. Jonas Youker), David, John, Jane (Mrs. William Bailey), Thomas J., Elijah, James H., Melissa and Emily C. (Mrs. Samuel Belcher.) Thomas J. Kibbe was reared in Harrison township from the age of two years. In early manhood he settled on the farm he now owns and occupies, all of which he cleared and improved, and one has but to drive by his farm to see the evidence of thrift and enterprise. Mr. Kibbe was in the Civil war. He was drafted in 1863, and served eight months in Company B, One Hundred and Eighty-ninth Pennsylvania Regiment. After his discharge he again enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and Seventy-first New York Volunteers, in which he served a year and five days, when he was honorably discharged. After the war he resumed his farming, and is one of the most prominent and successful farmers of Harrison township. In June, 1853, he married Dorcas, daughter of Joseph and Anna (Brown) Cotton, of Harrison township, and they have had eleven children, named as follows: Sally A.. (Mrs. Malvin Baker), born in Harrison township, June 7, 1853; Julietta (Mrs. Theo. Hunt), born October 24, 1854; Alonzo, M.D., born April 16, 1856; James H., born June 26, 1858; Luzern F., born February 22, 1860; Mary Z. (Mrs. M. Baker), born June 4, 1861; Thomas J., Jr., born December 21, 1863; Sherman E., born May 12, 1865; George W., born February. 22, 1867; Arthur E., born May 15, 1873, and Adortha, who was born September 27, 1875 and died April 5, 1880. Mr. Kibbe is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic.

D.E. LEWIS, farmer, P.O. North Fork, was born in Brookfield, Penn., May 2, 1822, a son of Simeon B. and Ruth (Coon) Lewis, natives of Petersburg, N.Y., who settled in Brookfield, Tioga Co., Penn., in 1821, where they cleared and improved a farm, on which they lived the remainder of their lives. Mr. Lewis was reared in his native township, and after reaching his majority, purchased a tract of land which he cleared and improved, and where he resided up to 1853. He then purchased the farm he now occupies, in Harrison township, Potter county, which he also cleared and improved, and where he has since resided. In 1844 he married Roxanna, daughter of Clark and Zernah (Jordan) Rice, of Brookfield, Tioga Co., Penn., and to them have been born six children: Harmon C., Mary (Mrs. Benjamin Hunt), Lois (Mrs. Le Grand Mascho), William H., Annis (Mrs. Frank Ramsey), and Martin (deceased). Mr. Lewis is a representative farmer. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in politics he is a Republican.

HARVEY B. METCALF, farmer, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born in West Union, Steuben Co., N.Y., November 4, 1845, a son of Morris P. and Lucinda (Baker) Metcalf, early settlers of West Union, N.Y., and later of Brookfield, Penn., now residing in Woodbury county, Iowa. Harvey B. Metcalf was reared in Brookfield, Tioga Co., Penn., where his parents settled in 1854. He was in the war of the Rebellion, enlisting, February 8, 1864, in Company L, Second Pennsylvania Cavalry; was transferred to Battery C, Fourth United States Artillery, and was honorably discharged in July, 1865. After the war he returned to Brookfield, and in 1869 settled in Harrison township, where he owns two farms, both of which he has cleared and improved. October 6, 1867, he married Elvira, daughter of Thomas and Alvina (Hurlbut) Cornish, of Harrison township. They have five children: Morris G., Frances M., Andrew A., Mary and Hattie. Mr. Metcalf is a Republican in politics, and one of the many respected citizens of the county.

JOHN OLNEY, dealer in agricultural implements, Harrison Valley, was born in Berkshire, Tioga Co., N.Y., June 12, .1836, a son of Orman and Lydia (White) Olney, who settled in Harrison township, in 1852, on the farm now owned by Mr. Olney, most of which they cleared and improved, and lived there until their death. Orman Olney was twice married. His first wife was Tabitha Clark, by whom he had two children: Charlotte (Mrs. Horace Miller) and David C. His second wife was Lydia White, by whom he had three children: Dan, Oliver W. and John. John Obey was sixteen years old when he came with his parents to Harrison township, and has since lived in the township, and for many years was engaged in farming. In 1884 he embarked in the hardware trade at Harrison Valley, in which he continued five years, and since the spring of 1889 has been dealing in agricultural implements. January 22, 1863, he married Sarah A., daughter of Samuel and Eunice (Copley) Haynes, of Harrison township. Mr. Olney is a prominent citizen. He is a Republican.

CHARLES M. PREDMORE, farmer, P.O, Harrison Valley, was born in Andover, Steuben Co., N.Y., April 14, 1852, a son of James S. and Mary (W ells) Predmore. His father, who was a native of New Jersey, settled in Harrison township in 1853, where he cleared and improved the farm now occupied by our subject, where he died. His children were Francis M., Charles M., Amelia A. (Mrs. Elymus Monroe), Julia F. (Mrs. Edward B. English), Encie (Mrs. Jesse McConnell), John W., Billy W., Rosalie (Mrs. John Shellman) and Charlotte E. (Mrs. W.M. Snyder). Charles M. Predmore was reared in Harrison township, and at his father' s death succeeded to the ownership of the homestead, by purchasing the interest of the other heirs, and there he has since resided. February 1, 1874, he married Emma D., daughter of Edward and Emeline (Stone) Stebbins, of Harrison township, and they have one son, Royal L. Mr. Predmore is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; in politics he is a Republican.

M.R. PRITCHARD, physician and surgeon, Harrison Valley, was born in Westfield, Tioga Co., Penn., March 4, 1852, a son of Morris and Sarah (Haven) Pritchard. His paternal grandfather was Lyman Pritchard, and his maternal grandfather was Royal Haven, pioneers of Tioga county, and of Bradford county, Penn., respectively. Dr. Pritchard was reared in his native town, where he received a public-school education. In 1877 he began the study of medicine with Dr. A.L. Bottum, of Westfield. He took a course of lectures at Detroit Medical College, Detroit, Mich., in 1878 to 79, was graduated at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, Md., in 1880, and immediately located at Harrison Valley, where he has since been in active practice, and built up a lucrative business. In 1882 he went into partnership with his brother-in-law, W.E. Gilbert, in a drug store, still continuing his practice. This proved to be too hard work, and in 1887 he sold the drug business to his partner. Dr. Pritchard is emphatically a self-made man. Much of his early life was spent in the employ of Dodge & Co., at Williamsport, to obtain means to pursue his studies. Feeling the need of a higher standard in the profession, the Doctor took a course of instruction at the New York Post Graduate Medical School and Hospital in the winter of 1888—89. He has been twice married. His first wife was Carrie Douglass, of Hector, Potter county, and his present wife is Nettie, daughter of Allison Evans, of Lawrenceville, Penn., and they had one daughter, Vera, who died November 5, 1889, of typhoid fever. Dr. Pritchard is a member of the Potter County Medical Society, and of the I.O.O.F. Politically he is a Republican.

BURR ROBINSON, farmer, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., January 20, 1839, a son of Samuel M. and Olive J. (Plank) Robinson. His maternal grandfather was Lovell P. Plank, a native of Scotland, and among the pioneers of Brookfield, Tioga Co., Penn. Samuel M. Robinson came to Harrison township in 1825, and in 1833 settled on a farm in the northern part of the township, which he cleared and improved, and which is now owned by his son Burr. He was a resident of the township until his death, which occurred when he was aged seventy-two years, five months and seven days. His children were Rosetta (Mrs. Lyman Dibble), Burr, Josephine (Mrs. William H. Tompkins), Waldo and Lovell. Burr Robinson was reared in his native township, where he has always resided. He was in the Rebellion, enlisting in October, 1864, in Company I, One Hundred and Twelfth New York Volunteers, and participated in battles of Chapin' s farm, Fort Fisher and Wilmington. He was mustered out of the service at Raleigh, N.C., June 14, 1865, and honorably discharged July 2, 1865. Since the war he has been engaged in farming, and has occupied the farm where he now resides since December, 1859. He was married July 3, 1857, to Harriet O., daughter of Danford and Amy (Dibble) Lincoln, of Harrison township, and they have five children: Olive (Mrs. W. J. Erway), Samuel M., Clara (Mrs. James Stevens), Dora and Lovell (the last named being deceased). Mr. Robinson is a well known and prominent farmer of Harrison township. In politics he is a Republican.

EZEKIEL ROOKS, farmer, P.O. Spring Mills, N.Y., was born in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., June 18, 1836, a son of Daniel and Delanah (Bolman) Rooks, formerly of Painted Post, N.Y., and among the pioneers of Harrison township, having settled on the farm now owned and occupied by Mr. Rooks, most of which they cleared. They had a family of seven children: John, Catherine (Mrs. Lester Merrick), Jane (Mrs. Willard Cutler), Mary (Mrs. William Beach), Ezekiel, Caroline (Mrs. William Statham) and Lyman. The paternal grandfather, Daniel Rooks, was a Revolutionary soldier and a pioneer of Bingham township, Potter county, where he died. Ezekiel Rooks was reared in Harrison township, and has always lived on the old homestead, of which he has made a model farm, and has fitted up with all modern improvements, showing his thrift and enterprise. His wife was Addie, daughter of John Wiley, of Steuben county, N.Y. Mr. Rooks is a prominent farmer and citizen of Harrison township, is a Republican, and has served in different local offices.

GILBERT SCOVILLE, farmer, P.O. White' s Corners, was born in Cornwall, Conn., April 23, 1816, a son of Jesse and Rhoda (Humphrey) Scoville, who settled in Harrison township in 1838, where they afterward lived and died. They reared a family of six children: Gilbert, Martha (Mrs. Alva Andrews), Luman H., Almond C., Lewis P. and Mary J. (Mrs. John Sherwood). Our subject was reared in his native town, and in Cortland county, N.Y. He came with his parents to Harrison township in 1838, and assisted his father in clearing the homestead, on which he has ever since resided. He was twice married. His first wife was Theodosia Ann, daughter of Oramel and L.C. Austin, of Harrison township, by whom he had three children: Mary V. (Mrs. Caleb A. Palmatier), William H. and Harry A. His second wife was Ruth, daughter of Elisha and Ruth Horton, formerly of Connecticut, by whom he has one son, Perry E. Mr. Scoville is one of the few pioneers still living in Harrison township. He is a prominent citizen and farmer. In politics he is a Democrat, and has served his township several years as constable and school director.

J. AVERY SMITH, farmer, P.O. Mills, was born in Greenwood, Steuben Co., N.Y., January 4, 1839, a son of Jesse and Polly (Miner) Smith, natives of Tompkins county, N.Y., and pioneers of Steuben county, N.Y. His paternal grandfather was Enos Smith, and his maternal grandfather was Allen Miner, both pioneers of Steuben Co., N.Y. Mr. Smith was reared in his native county, and settled in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1864, where he has since been engaged in farming. He was in the Civil war, enlisting in July, 1863, in Company K, One Hundred and Seventh New York Volunteers, and was honorably discharged on account of disability, in March, 1864. The same year he married Emily, daughter of Isaac and Keziah (Wickes) Thompson, who settled in Harrison township in 1832. To them have been born three children: Anna M., born January 5, 1866; Edith B., born July 26, 1873, and Jesse M., born January 22, 1877. Mr. Smith occupies a part of the Isaac Thompson homestead. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and in politics is a Republican.

EDWIN STATHAM, farmer, P.O. North Fork, was born in Dutchess county, N.Y., July 31, 1823, a son of Thomas and Ann M. (Johnson) Statham, natives of England, who settled in Harrison township in 1844. They located on the farm now occupied by Edwin Statham, which they cleared and improved, residing there until their death. Their children were Emma (Mrs. Stephen Ludington), Edwin, Henry, William, Walter, Ellen (Mrs. Octavus Stedman) and Delight (Mrs. George R. Smith). Edwin Statham was reared in Dryden, N.Y., and settled with his parents in Harrison township in 1844, where he has since resided, and after his father's death he purchased the homestead, which he has since occupied. His wife was Esther, daughter of Dr. Austin and Maria White, of Harrison township, and to them have been born the following named children: Darwin, Anna M. (Mrs. De Forest Burdick), Manzo, Walter, Ira, Carlos, Fannie (Mrs. John Riley) and Harriet (Mrs. Will Daly). Mr. Statham is an old and respected citizen of Harrison township, and has held several of the local offices of trust. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; in politics he is a Republican.

S. JEROME STETSON, farmer, P.O. White's Corners, was born in Otselic, Chenango Co., N.Y., November 5, 1841, a son of Oliver and Abigail (Hardy) Stetson. He was reared in his native town, and received a limited education in the common schools. He was a soldier in the Civil war, enlisting January 6, 1864, in Company A, Ninth New York Heavy Artillery, was on detached service until the close of the struggle, and was honorably discharged in May, 1865. In June of the same year he settled in Harrison township, on the farm he now owns, which he had purchased prior to his enlistment, and cleared and improved the same. In January, 1866, he married Orcelia, daughter of R.M. and Almira (Lighthall) Howard, of Harrison township, and they have two children, Edith and Jay. Mr. Stetson is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; in politics he is a Republican.

SYLVESTER K. STEVENS, farmer, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born in Cortland county, N.Y., November 15, 1830, a son of Kelsey and Emeline (Watrous) Stevens, both natives of Cortland county, N.Y., who settled in Harrison township, on the farm now owned by G. W. Stevens. His paternal grandparents were Henry and Jerusha (Fox) Stevens, natives of Connecticut and Vermont, respectively, and pioneers of Cortland county, N.Y. His maternal grandparents were Austin and Sally (Backus) Watrous, natives of Connecticut, and also pioneers of Cortland county. Sylvester K. was reared in his native place, and at the age of eighteen removed with his parents to Harrison township, this county, where he has since resided. He has helped to clear and improve several farms in the township, and has lived on the farm he now occupies since 1875. He was in the Civil war, enlisting in September, 1864, in Company I, One Hundred and Eighty-ninth New York Volunteers. He was taken sick the following December, and sent to the hospital. He was honorably discharged from the service June 10, 1865. After the war he engaged in mercantile trade at Harrison Valley for three years, and has since been engaged in farming. October 2, 1860, he married Sarah, daughter of Thaddeus and Diana (Gill) Stone, who settled in Harrison township in 1827. To Mr. and Mrs. Stevens were born five children: Frank, May, Herbert, Ella and Willie. Mr. Stevens is a member of the Baptist Church. He has served Harrison township as justice of the peace ten years, and was pension agent ten years. Politically he is a Republican.

JASON W. STEVENS, general merchant, Harrison Valley, was born in Cortland county, N.Y., March 25, 1839, a son of Kelsey and Emeline (Watrous) Stevens, both natives of Cortland county, who settled in Harrison township, Potter Co. Penn., locating on the farm now owned by G.W. Stevens, most of which they cleared and improved. Their children were Sylvester K., Minerva, C. (Mrs. H.N. Stone), Jason W., George W. and Eugene K. J.W. Stevens was reared in Harrison township from the age of ten years, remaining at home until after the breaking out of the Civil war, when he enlisted, October 16, 1861, in Company G, Fifty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers. He reenlisted as a veteran December 20, 1863, in same company and regiment, served until the close of the war, and was mustered out June 30, 1865. He was wounded twice; first at Fredericksburg, December 14, 1862, and again in front of Petersburg. June 18, 1864. He was commissioned captain of his company August 25, 1864. After the war he engaged in farming, and in the fall of 1866 was elected treasurer of Potter county for a term of two years. In 1869 he embarked in mercantile business at Harrison Valley, in which he has since successfully continued, there being at the time but two stores in Harrison township. Mr. Stevens was twice married. His first wife was Angie, daughter of Luke and Mary (Rathbone) Darling, of Allegheny township, Potter Co., Penn., by whom he has one son, Archie. His second, wife was Rilla, daughter of Job and Chloe (Ellis) Rixford, of Tioga county, Penn., and they have four children: Lina, Mildred, Arthur and Lura. Mr. Stevens was postmaster at Harrison Valley from 1869 to 1885, a term of sixteen years. He is a member of Ulysses Post, No. 279, G. A.R. Politically he is a Republican.

HORACE N. STONE, farmer, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., December 16, 1829, a son of Thaddeus and Diana (Gill) Stone. His paternal grandfather was Levi Stone, a native of Connecticut and a cooper by trade, who settled in Harrison township about 1827, where he worked at his trade and followed farming to some extent. His children, who lived in Potter county, were Thaddeus, Levi R., Samuel W. and Benjamin N., all pioneers of Harrison township. Thaddeus settled at White's Corners in Harrison township in 1825, where he lived four years. In 1829 he removed to the farm now occupied by C.L. Stone, which he cleared and improved, and resided in the township until his death. He was a prominent citizen of his day; was commissioner of Potter county one term, and for a number of years was justice of the peace for Harrison township. He reared a family of eleven children: Nancy R. (Mrs. Alfred Cummings), Amanda E. (Mrs. Edward Stebbins), Eleanor (Mrs. N.W. Hubbard), Horace N., Levi O., John M., Esther (Mrs. George Collver), Sarah (Mrs. S.K. Stevens), Franklin (a soldier in the Civil war, taken prisoner at Gettysburg, and died in Andersonville prison), Chester L. and. Alice (Mrs. A. Erway). Horace N. Stone was reared in Harrison township, where he has always resided. He was a soldier in the Civil war, enlisting September 1, 1864, in Company I, One Hundred and Eighty-ninth New York Volunteers. He was in the battle of Hatcher' s run and at the Weldon raid, and was honorably discharged June 10, 1865. Mr. Stone has cleared and improved several farms in Harrison township, besides a part of the one he now occupies, where he has lived since March, 1869. He married, May 18, 1858, Minerva C., daughter of Kelsey and Emeline (Watrous) Stevens, of Harrison township, and to them have been born three children: DeElton J., George E. and Ethie A. Mr. Stone is a representative farmer and citizen of Harrison township, and has held several of the local offices of the same. Politically he is a Republican.

CHESTER L. STONE, farmer, P.O. Harrison Valley, was born August 19, 1843, in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., on the farm he now occupies, a son of Thaddeus and Diana (Gill) Stone. He was reared in his native township, and has always resided on the old homestead. In September, 1864, he enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and Eighty-ninth New York Volunteers, and after nine months' service was honorably discharged. In 1875 he married Chrischanna, daughter of William B. and Cynthia S. (Johnson) Fox, who settled in Harrison township in 1853. The issue of this union was one son, George W. Mr. Stone is a representative farmer and citizen, is a member of the G.A. R., and in politics is a Republican.

AUSTIN A. SWETLAND, proprietor of the cheese factory, Harrison Valley, was born in Freetown township, Cortland Co., N.Y., June 3, 1832, a son of Harmon and Rosamond (Watrous) Swetland. His paternal grandfather, Aaron Swetland, was a native of Connecticut, of English descent, and was a pioneer of Granville, Washington Co., N.Y. He settled in Cortland county, N.Y., in 1815, and resided there until his death. His maternal grandfather was Austin Watrous, also of English descent, and a pioneer of Cortland county, N.Y. His parents settled in Harrison township, Potter CO., Penn., in 1858, where his father engaged in farming, making this their home the rest of their lives. They had four children, viz.: Morgan W., Mulford R., Austin. A. and Esther (Mrs. Ray Cummings). Austin A. Swetland was reared in Cortland county, N.Y., and is a cooper and blacksmith by trade. He settled in Harrison township in 1857, where he followed his trade more or less for twelve years. He was in the late war, enlisting in September, 1864, in Company I, One Hundred and Eighty-ninth New York Volunteers, and participated in the battles of Gravelly Run, Hatcher' s Run, Lewis farm and Five Forks, and was at the front when Lee surrendered. He was honorably discharged in June, 1865. After the war he was engaged in various branches of business; worked at his trade to some extent, was proprietor of the Coudersport & Westfield stage line three years, and has conducted a cheese factory in Harrison Valley since 1883. In 1860 he married Susan, daughter of Rev. Benjamin and Catherine (Gorton) Thomas, of Harrison township, and they have two children: Roger W. and Kittie L. Mr. Swetland has been justice of the peace for Harrison township nine years, and was elected treasurer of Potter county in 1886, for a term of three years. He is a Republican.

CHESTER A. SWETLAND, of the firm of Walter & Swetland, lumber manufacturers, Mills, Penn., was born in Freetown township, Cortland Co., N.Y., December 18, 1854, a son of Morgan W. and Parmelia (Stevens) Swetland, who settled in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1863, where the father still resides, engaged in farming. They have five children: Clara (Mrs. P.E. Rexford), Carl, Chester A., Luella (Mrs. A.V. Harrison) and Henry H. Chester A. Swetland was reared in Harrison township from the age of nine years, and has been prominently identified with the lumber business since 1878. In September, 1881, he married Kate, daughter of Charles H. and Mary (Thomas) Doud, of Harrison Valley, and they have three children: Grace, Benjamin and Burt.

ISAAC C. THOMPSON, retired farmer, P.O. Potter Brook, Tioga Co., Penn., was born in Tompkins county, N.Y., November 16, 1821, a son of Isaac and Keziah (Wickes) Thompson. His father was a native of Connecticut and a son of Jared Thompson, a pioneer of Ulysses, Tompkins Co., N.Y. His maternal grandfather was Israel P. Wickes, formerly of Rensselaer county, N.Y., and a pioneer of Tompkins county, N.Y. Isaac Thompson, Sr., settled with his family in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1832, locating on a farm where the village of Mills now stands, and cleared and improved the same; here he died March 26, 1874, and his wife November 13, 1876. They reared a family of seven children: Lydia (Mrs. Ephraim Z. Olney), Jared, Isaac C., Nancy (Mrs. Aaron Webster), Prudence (Mrs. Alonzo Hawks), Emily (Mrs. John A. Smith), and Israel. Mr. Thompson was a prominent citizen of his day, a member of the Baptist Church, and took an active part in establishing the present church at Harrison Valley, contributing nearly one-half the fund for its erection; he was deacon in this church until his death. He served Potter county as commissioner and treasurer with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of his constituents, and was a genial and public spirited citizen. Isaac C. Thompson was reared in Harrison township, and assisted his father in clearing the homestead, where, with the exception of five years he lived in Hector, he resided until 1866, when he removed to Potter Brook, Tioga county, and has since resided there. He was in the Civil war, enlisting September 1, 1864, in Company D, Two Hundred and Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was honorably discharged after ten months' service. He has been married twice. His first wife was Mary A., daughter of Stephen and Matilda Potter, of Potter Brook, Penn., by whom he had five children: Emily T. (Mrs. W.D. Weeks), Sophronia M. (Mrs. B.F. Mulford), Julia A. (Mrs. L.J. Skinner), Eva K. (Mrs. A.V. Hawley) and Hattie (Mrs. Wm. Nivision). His present wife was Mrs. Sarah A. (Rossiter) Stevens, of Homer, Potter county. Mr. Thompson and wife are members of the Baptist Church at Harrison Valley, of which he has been deacon since his father's death. He served one term as auditor of Potter county. He is a member of the Sons of Temperance, politically is a stanch Republican, and is a strong advocate of prohibition.

ANDREW WALLIS, general blacksmith, Elmer, was born in Cornwall, England, May 10, 1854, a son of William and Elizabeth (Wherry) Wallis. He came to America in 1871, locating in Wayne county, Penn., where he learned the blacksmith's trade, at which he worked as a journeyman until 1879, when he settled in Harrison township, this county, where he has since carried on a successful business for his own account, establishing his shop at Elmer in 1880. He was married May 30, 1880, to Susie, daughter of George and Philena (Durfee) Gilbert, of Harrison township, and they have three children: Frank, Charles and Bessie. Mr. Wallis is a Republican in politics, and is a worthy citizen of Harrison township.

WILLIAM H. WARNER, one of the early settlers of Potter county, Penn., was born in the town of Bristol, county of Hartford, State of Connecticut, July 1, 1792. His father's name was Samuel, who came from England when quite young; his mother's name was Mary Jerome. He also had three brothers Benjamin, Samuel and Jerome, and three sisters: Sally, Cynthia and Polly. When eighteen years of age, he and his younger brother, who was sixteen, went on foot to the town of Preble, Cortland Co., N.Y., where they hired out, went to work, and in time saved enough to buy a farm, which they cleared up and improved, when, through some defect in the title, they lost it all. In 1819 he married Polly Gill, daughter of John Gill, of Preble, and, after they had lost their home, he set out to find another; and in 1825 came with his wife and two boys (one aged five years and the other six months) to Potter county, Penn., and settled in the northwest corner of Harrison township, a very thinly settled part of the county, at which time there were only seven inhabitants between their residence and Coudersport, a distance of twenty-eight miles. Deer were plentiful, and furnished about all the meat they had, with a little bear meat occasionally for variety. Wolves were also plentiful, and they could be heard howling nights very often. One morning Mr. Warner found sixteen sheep lying dead in a small field, not over ten rods from the house; in fact, all the sheep he owned had been killed by the wolves. In 1832 he was appointed justice of the peace, which office he held for twelve consecutive years; he was also one of the county commissioners at the time of the building of the first court-house. Politically he was a Democrat; religiously he was brought up a strict Presbyterian, but in after years he became a Universalist and a firm believer in that faith. He was loved and respected by all who became acquainted with him, and died November 1, 1861. His widow survived him sixteen years and died at the age of seventy-nine years.

WASHINGTON L. WARNER, farmer, P.O. White's Corners, was born in Harrison township, Potter Co., Penn., February 14, 1837, a son of William H. and Polly (Gill) Warner, formerly of Preble, Cortland Co., N.Y., who settled in Harrison township in 1825, locating on the farm now owned and occupied by W.L. Warner, most of which they cleared and improved, and resided on until their death. They had three children: John H., Wellesly W. and Washington L., the last of whom was born and reared on the old homestead where he has always resided. In 1857 he married Sarah M., daughter of Frederick and Nancy (Latta) Coston, of Harrison township, and they had two children, Francis M. (deceased) and Lelia N. Mr. Warner is a prominent and representative farmer of Harrison township, and one of the leading and public-spirited citizens. Politically he has always been a Democrat.

Source: Page(s) 1197-1217 History of Counties of McKean, Elk and Forest, Pennsylvania. Chicago, J.H. Beers & Co., 1890.
Transcribed February 2006 by Carol Eddleman Published 2006 by PA-Roots