CHAPTER XXV

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES - SHARON, OSWAYO AND GENESEE TOWNSHIPS

SHARON TOWNSHIP

ANDREW J. BARNES, lumberman and farmer, P.O. Millport, was born in Wayne county, Penn., March 30, 1836, a son of Gabriel and Salena J. (Starr) Barnes, who settled in Sharon township, Potter county, in 1838, where the father engaged in lumbering, at which business he continued until his death. He reared a large family of children, named as follows: Ann, Adeline (Mrs. F. Fuller), Andrew J., George H. (killed at the battle of Chattanooga), Charles, James (both in the army), Susan (Mrs. William Caldwell), Alice (Mrs. George Corwin) Mary (Mrs. William McMurray), Thomas, Fremont, Rodney and Ida. Andrew J. Barnes was reared in Sharon township, and began life as a lumberman. He enlisted in the Civil war in October, 1861, in Company G, Fifty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, serving eleven months, when he was honorably discharged on account of disability. After his return home he re-embarked in the lumber business, as agent for Weston Bros., of Olean, N.Y., in which he has been very successful. He has cleared and improved most of the farm he now occupies, which was his father' s homestead, and has been in the mercantile trade at Millport since 1878. He married twice. His first wife was Delia, daughter of Silas Babbitt, of Sharon township, by whom he had five children: Guy S., Silas, Belle (Mrs. O.B.Howard), Charles and Jessie. His present wife was Laura, daughter of William Lockwood, of Oswayo township, by whom he has four children: Alfred, Leslie, Salena, and Weston (an infant son). Mr. Barnes is one of the leading citizens and business men of Sharon township. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Grand Army of the Republic. In politics he is a Democrat.

ZALMON BARNES, farmer, P.O. Honeoye, was born in Barton, Tioga Co., N.Y., November 11, 1840, and is a son of Christopher and Mary H. (Lott) Barnes, natives also of Barton, N.Y. His father settled in Sharon township, this county, in 1852, and cleared and improved the farm now occupied by Zalmon., who was reared in Sharon from fourteen years of age. September 10, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, Eighty-fifth New York Volunteers. He was taken prisoner at Plymouth, N.C., and sent to Andersonville prison, where he remained five months; from there he was taken to Charleston prison, and one month later to Florence prison, where he also remained two months, when he was paroled. He was honorably discharged at Elmira, N.Y., March 25, 1865. He then returned home to Sharon township, where he engaged in farming, and for twelve yearswas in the lumber business. He married, January 1, 1870, Rosetta F., daughter of Nathan and Clarissa (Chapel) Hayward, of Bolivar, N.Y., and they have one son, Charles E. Mr. Barnes is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and of the G.A.R. In politics he is a Republican and has held the office of school director four years.

GEORGE M. BRIGHTMAN, farmer, P.O. Shinglehouse, was born in Oneonta, N.Y., June 24, 1820, a son of George and Sally (Brightman) Brightman. He was reared in his native town, and settled in Sharon township, this county, in 1849, and in 1869 located on the farm he now occupies, most of which he cleared and improved. His wife was Alzina, daughter of Charles and Chloe (Perry) Perry, of Saratoga Co., N.Y., by whom he had seven children: William, George, Charles, Warren B. (now district attorney of Potter county), Minerva (Mrs. John T. Smith), Helen (Mrs. Avery Moshier) and Georgia. Of these, William was in the Rebellion, and died in the service of his country. Mr. Brightman is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He cast his first presidential vote for Gen. William H. Harrison in 1840, and his last for the grandson, Gen. Benjamin Harrison, in 1888.

WILLIAM J. BROWN, farmer and lumberman, P.O. Millport, was born in Washington county, N.Y., October 20, 1826, a son of William and Ruth (Saxon) Brown. He was reared in St. Croix, Wis., and Tioga county, Penn. In 1845 he enlisted in the Mexican war, in which he served eleven months. In 1846 he settled in Sweden, Potter county, where he was engaged in lumbering up to 1865. He then removed to Millport, in Sharon township, where he has since resided, and been engaged in lumbering and farming. July 29, 1849, he married Lucinda, daughter of Silas and Cyntha (Felt) Nelson, of Eulalia township, this county, and they have six children, viz.: Ella (Mrs. Joshua Dunning), Alice (Mrs. Ransom Munger), Rose (Mrs. Charles McDonald), Herbert (married to Nettie Sloat), Fannie (Mrs. Eugene C. Drake) and Charles (married to Libbie Hallett). Mr. Brown is a prominent and leading citizen of Sharon township. Politically he is a Republican. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, both lodge and chapter.

PELEG BURDIC, proprietor of the Sharon Centre House, Sharon Centre, was born in Addison, Steuben Co., N.Y., April 24, 1830, a son of Thomas J. and Ursula (Gibbs) Burdic, who settled at Millport, Sharon township, Potter Co., Penn., about 1838, where they resided two years; then moved to Sharon Centre, locating on the land now owned and occupied by their son Peleg, where the father engaged in lumbering for many years. They reared a family of nine children, viz.: John, Peleg, George, Jesse, Roxie, Melvin, Helen (Mrs. Dana Drake), Ralph and Almira (Mrs. DeWitt Gustin). Peleg Burdic was reared in Sharon, and his early life was spent in lumbering, at which he continued up to 1861, when he erected the Sharon Centre House, which he has since successfully conducted. December 31, 1863, he enlisted in Company L, Fifteenth New York Cavalry, participated in the Shenandoah raids and was honorably discharged July 4, 1865. He married Matilda, daughter of Joseph and Esther (Gibbs) Manley, of Addison, N.Y., and they have one son, Wallace, a merchant of Sharon Centre. Mr. Burdic has been postmaster of Sharon Centre since Lincoln' s first administration. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, both lodge and chapter, and of the Knights of Labor. Politically he is a stanch advocate of the Greenback doctrine.

DE WITT C. CHASE, retired, P.O. Millport, was born in Jerusalem, Yates Co., N.Y., September 24, 1818, a son of Rev. John B. and Rebecca (Winship) Chase, early settlers of Yates and Allegany counties, N.Y. Mr. Chase settled in Sharon townshjp, Potter county, in 1844, where, for a number of years, he was engaged in farming. In 1865 he embarked in general mercantile business, in which he successfully continued up to 1878, when ill health compelled him to retire. Mr. Chase is an honored and respected citizen of Millport. He cast his first presidential vote for William H. Harrison in 1840, and his last for the grandson, Benjamin Harrison, in 1888.

CHARLES H. COLE, county commissioner, justice of the peace and lumberman, Shinglehouse, was born in Clara township, Potter Co., Penn., June 10, 1855, a son of William A. and Almira (Smith) Cole, the father a native of Cortland county, N.Y., and the mother of Harrison, Potter Co., Penn. His paternal grandfather, Jonathan Cole, was a pioneer of Sharon township, and later removed to Oswayo township, and died there. His maternal grandfather, Jonathan Smith, was a pioneer of Harrison township, this county. William A. Cole was a farmer of Clara township, and there Charles H. was reared and educated. He began life as a teacher in the common schools, and in 1879 entered as a clerk the store of George W. Dodge, of Shinglehouse, by whom he was employed four years. He then formed a partnership with Mr. Dodge, and embarked in the hardware trade at Shinglehouse, under the firm name of Dodge & Cole, and carried on business for four years. In May, 1884, Mr. Cole married Jessie A., daughter of Amos A. and Dolly (Jones) Newton, of Sharon township, and they have two children: Harold and Dolly. In 1884 Mr. Cole was elected justice of the peace for Sharon township, which office he still holds, and in 1888 was elected county commissioner for a term of three years. He is a popular citizen and business man. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., and in politics is a Republican.

ABRAM DEREMER, farmer, P.O. East Sharon, was born in Hunterdon county, N.J., July 13, 1821, a son of Joseph and Rachel (Bishop) Deremer, natives of New Jersey and pioneers of Tompkins and Steuben counties, N.Y., and later of Crawford county, Penn. Abram Deremer was reared in Steuben county, N.Y., where he married Caroline, daughter of Daniel and Polly (Opdyke) Richey, by whom he has six children living: Delia and Adelbert (twins, former married to J.A. Smith), Alice (Mrs. Almon Pearsall), Fannie (Mrs. Walter Crosby), Dora (Mrs. Edgar Smith) and Daniel. Mr. Deremer, who has always been a farmer, settled in Sharon tdwnship in 1868, where he has since resided, a prominent and respected citizen. In politics he is a Democrat, and served as auditor of the township three years.

JAMES W. DICKINSON, lumberman and farmer, P.O. Millport, was born in Tioga county, Penn., August 18, 1842, a son of James and Electa Dickinson. In 1849 he removed to Sharon township, Potter county, with his brother-in-law, Archibald Sloat, where he was reared and educated from seven years of age. February 1, 1864, he enlisted in Company D, Eighty-fifth New York Volunteers. He was captured at Plymouth, N.C., and sent to Andersonville, where he was kept a prisoner ten months; from there was sent to Richmond and paroled, and was honorably discharged from the service July 14, 1865. He then returned to Sharon township, where he has since resided, and followed the business of lumbering and farming, clearing and improving the farm he now occupies. Mr. Dickinson married, June 17, 1861, Jeanette M.,daughter of Richard and Emily Corwin, of Sharon township, and they have three children: Ellsworth, Marion and Jessie. Mr. Dickinson is a member of the G.A.R. In. politics he is a Republican.

GEORGE W. DODGE, merchant, Shinglehouse, was born in Pike, Wyoming Co., N.Y., December 21, 1843, a son of Daniel and Adelia E. (Newcomb) Dodge. His father was an early settler of Sharon township, Potter county, where he engaged in farming and lumbering, and resided until his death. By his first wife, Adelia Newcomb, he had four children: George W., Catherine L. (Mrs. E.D. Holmes), Mary A. (Mrs. Ralph Burdic) and Jerome D. (a physician at Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio). His second wife was Jeanette, daughter of Lewis Wood, of Sharon township. George W. Dodge was reared in Pike, N.Y. He was a soldier in the Civil war, enlisting September 21, 1861, in Company F, Fifth New York Cavalry. He was wounded in the foot at Hagerstown, Md., in July, 1863, and was honorably discharged after a service of three years and one month. After the war he located in Sharon township, where he was engaged in the lumber business with his father for a number of years. In 1878 he embarked in mercantile business at Shinglehouse, in which he has since been engaged, and has been a member of the firm of Dodge & Newton, at Rixford, McKean county, since 1879. He also carries on the homestead farm. His wife is Emma, daughter of Nelson and Lorinda (White) Parmenter, of Sharon township, and they have three sons, Ulric S., Fred and Daniel. Mr. Dodge is a prominent citizen and merchant of Shinglehouse. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and of the G.A.R. In. politics he is a Republican., and in 1888 was elected member of assembly from his district.

DANA DRAKE, farmer, P.O. Sharon Centre, was born in Sharon township, Potter Co., Penn., November 4, 1844, a son of Simon and Mary P. (Warner) Drake. His paternal grandfather was a pioneer of Ceres, McKean Co., Penn., afterward removing to Illinois, where he died; and his maternal grandfather was Seth Warner, a pioneer of Bingham township, this county. The parents of our subject settled in Sharon township about 1839, and cleared and improved the farm now owned by Jacob Falling, his father dying in that township in 1886, aged seventy-three years. Simon Drake was married twice, his first wife being Mary, D. Warner, by whom he had four children who grew to maturity: Haline (Mrs. George Burdic), Seth B., Dana and Mary L. (Mrs. William Crocker). His second wife was Mrs. Melissa Murray, and by her were born six children: John W., Lydia B. (Mrs. A. Wright), Eugene, George H., Milton and Gertrude. Dana Drake was reared and educated in Sharon township, and began life as a lumberman and farmer. He cleared a part of the farm he now occupies, and made all the improvements in buildings. In 1866 he married Helen, daughter of Thomas J. and Ursula (Gibbs) Burdic, of Sharon township, and they have four children: Maggie (Mrs. Horace Pratt), Jesse, Eddie and Fillmore. Mr. Drake enlisted September 17, 1864, in Company D, Thirteenth New York Volunteers, and at the end of one year was honorably discharged. He has served one term of three years as commissioner of Potter county, and has held nearly all the local offices in Sharon township; is now serving his second term as justice of the peace. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the G.A.R., and is a Republican.

WILLIAM R. HALLETT, veterinary surgeon, Millport, is a native of Steuben county, N.Y. At the age of thirteen years he left home and located in Iowa in 1857, and attended the veterinary school at Marengo, that State, under the tuition of Coon, Stage & Talbert, where he remained four years. In. the fall of 1862, he enlisted in Company B, Twenty-eighth Iowa Volunteers. He was taken prisoner on the St. Francis, but escaped, the rest of the party being paroled after four months captivity and sent to St. Louis. While a member of the Twenty-eighth Iowa he was for a number of months on detached service with the Sixth Missouri Cavalry, and after three years' army service was honorably discharged. He then returned to Iowa and began the practice of veterinary surgery with Coon, Stage & Talbert, of Marengo, remaining there several years; later he located in Hebron township, Potter county, find since 1879 has been located at Millport, in Sharon township, where he has built up a large practice, and a successful one. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. In politics he votes independent of party.

PHILANDER D. HAWLEY, proprietor of the Hawley House, Shinglehouse, was born in Bingham township, Potter Co., Penn., May 9, 1849, a son of Salmon and Salaria L. (Canaan) Hawley. His paternal grandfather was James Hawley, and his great-grandfather was Solomon Hawley, both natives of Connecticut, who settled in Bingham township in 1827, where James Hawley erected a grist-mill (probably the first mill in Potter county), which, with his eldest son, Philander, he conducted for several years, and it was afterward operated by the latter until his death in 1851. The children of James Hawley were six: Philander, Abigail, Salmon, Leman, Marilla (Mrs. Henry Hurlbut) and Caroline (Mrs. William S. Burdick). Of these Salmon, father of our subject, was a physician, began practice at Ellisburg, this county, and later was at Oswayo, where he died August 18, 1855. His children were Josephine O. (Mrs. Henry Park), Philander D. and Salmon B. The subject of this sketch was reared in Oswayo, this county, and for a number of years worked at the carpenter and joiner's trade. He then followed the occupation of a miller for six years, and since 1881 has been a successful practitioner of veterinary surgery. He was the proprietor of the Lee House, Oswayo, from January, 1882, until April 1, 1883. In 1885 he purchased the hotel property at Shinglehouse, which he has since successfully conducted. March 15, 1870, he married Emma C., daughter of George and Mary A. (Bryant) Crouch, natives of England, who settled in Hebron, this county, in 1855. Mr. and Mrs. Hawley are the parents of two children, S. Belle and George C. Mr. Hawley is widely and favorably known in Potter and adjoining counties, and is a popular landlord. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and of the Equitable Aid Union. In politics he is a stanch Republican.

L.C. KINNER, general merchant, Shinglehouse, was born in Tioga county, Penn., September 23, 1840, a son of James and Julia (Curran) Kinner, formerly of Orange county, N.Y., and early settlers of Tioga county, Penn. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native county until seventeen years of age. In 1857 he entered the employ of William McDougall, of Oswayo, this county, acting in the capacity of clerk until the spring of 1858. He then entered the employ of C.H. Simmons, of the same place, with whom he was engaged until the breaking out of the war of the Rebellion. He enlisted, in May, 1861, in Company H, Seventy-first New York Volunteers, and participated in the battles of Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. He lost his left leg at the latter engagement, July 2, 1863, and was honorably discharged from the service in June, 1864. He then returned to Oswayo, and resumed his former position of clerk in the store of C.H. Simmons, remaining with him until 1873, when he embarked in. business for himself, on a small scale, at Shinglehouse. Here he built up a large and successful business, and has occupied his present commodius quarters since 1878. Mr. Kinner is one of the leading and prominent merchants of Shinglehouse. He has served one term as justice of the peace, is a member of the G.A.R., and is a Democrat.

CAPTAIN LEVI H. KINNEY, farmer, P.O. Shinglehouse, was born in Old Sodus, Wayne Co., N.Y., July 27, 1819, a son of Barnabas and Naamah (Holcomb) Kinney, natives, of Hillsdale, Columbia Co., N.Y. His paternal grandfather was Barnabas Kinney, a native of Scotland, who served through the Revolutionary war, and was a pioneer of Sodus, Wayne Co., N.Y. Though exempt from duty, he raised a company at Sodus, to participate in the war of 1812. His maternal grandfather was Return Holcomb, a native of Connecticut, who served in the French war of Canada, went through the Revolution, and was long a resident of Columbia county, N.Y., but died in Greene, Chenango Co., N.Y. Our subject was neared in Jasper, Steuben Co., N.Y., from five years of age, where he received a limited common-school education. In 1845 he came to Sharon, this county, where he worked in a saw-mill two years for $18 per month, and boarded himself. In the spring of 1847 he purchased the farm he now owns and occupies, all of which he has cleared and improved; for many years prior to the war he was engaged in lumbering. In August, 1861, he raised Company D, Eighty-fifth New York Volunteers, with whom he was mustered into the service as captain, and served three years, when he was honorably discharged. In 1839 he married Mary, daughter of Caleb and Deborah (Silsby) Tyler, of Steuben county, N.Y., and to them were born three children: Angie, Alanson T. and Bryce B. Alanson T. was in the Civil war, and served two years as a private in his father's company, but was promoted to second lieutenant; he resigned and returned home, and raised Company F, Two Hundred and Tenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, with which he was mustered in as captain; was wounded twice, and was disabled at Gravelly Run, April 4, 1865; he was mustered out with the company in June, 1865; he is now the sheriff of Branch county, Mich. Bryce B. was also a soldier, a member of Company B, Second Iowa Cavalry, and died in 1872, of disease contracted while in the service. Capt. Kinney is a prominent and representative citizen and farmer of Sharon. He has served one term of three years as commissioner for Potter county; he is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and politically is a stanch Republican.

RINALDO D. McDONALD, farmer, P.O. Shinglehouse, was born in Allegany Co., N.Y., April 17, 1840, son of Thomas and Catherine (Bacon) McDonald, the former a native of Ithaca, N.Y., and the latter of Dansville, N.Y. They settled in Sharon township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1841, where they resided until 1864, then removed to Watkins, and later to Portville, N.Y., where the mother died in 1865; the father died in Ceres, McKean Co., Penn., in 1888. They reared a family of ten children: William, John, Rinaldo D., Leander, Adelia (Mrs. Aaron Walker), Aurora (Mrs. George Metcalf), Laura (Mrs. C.J. Tubbs), Charles, Theodore and Ida (Mrs. M. Manley). R.D. McDonald was reared in Sharon township. He was a soldier in the war of the Rebellion, enlisting October 15, 1861, in Company G, Fifty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers. He served faithfully over two years, when he was honorably discharged on account of disability, December 31, 1863. After returning home he engaged in farming. He cleared a part of the farm he now occupies, and made all the improvements in buildings. In October, 1861, he married Victoria, daughter of William and Caroline (Savage) Cole, of Delaware county, Penn., and they have five children: William B., Maude, Ernest, Jennie and Harry. Mr. McDonald is a prominent farmer of Sharon township. He is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the G.A.R.

AMOS A. NEWTON, farmer, P.O. Sharon Centre, was born in Bainbridge, Chenango Co., N.Y., April 16, 1822, a son of Marshall and Prudence (Aylesworth) Newton. His paternal grandfather was Amasa Newton, a native of Vermont and a pioneer of Chenango county, N.Y., and was a son of Thaddeus Newton, a soldier of the Revolutionary war, also a pioneer of Chenango county. His maternal grandfather was Andrew Aylesworth, of French descent, also a pioneer of Chenango county, N.Y.

Amos A. Newton was reared in his native county and settled in Sharon township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1846; was for many years engaged in the lumber business, and was a member of the firm of Nichols, Stevens & Co., for ten years. He settled on the farm he now occupies, in 1867, most of which he cleared, and has made all improvements in buildings, etc. In 1850 he married Dolly S., daughter of Isaac W. and Nancy (Colvin) Jones, who were among the first settlers of Sharon township. They have five children, viz.: William E., Fred N., Jennie (Mrs. Arthur Cole), Jessie (Mrs. Charles H. Cole) and Kate. Mr. Newton is a prominent farmer of Sharon township, and an enterprising citizen. In politics he is a Republican.

FRED N. NEWTON, attorney at law, Shinglehouse, was born in Sharon township, Potter Co., Penn., February 22,1854, a son of Amos A. and Dolly S. (Jones) Newton (see sketch of Amos A. Newton). He was reared in his native town, and educated at the Coudersport public school and the State Normal School at Edinborough. He began the study of law in 1878, in the office of Olmsted & Larrabee, Coudersport, and was admitted to the bar in June, 1881. He married, November 2, 1873, Rose, daughter of Nelson and Lorinda (White) Parmenter, of Sharon, and they have three children: Lloyd S., Lawrence L. and Laura L. (twins). Mr. Newton is one of the justices of the peace of Sharon township, and is politically a Republican.

FRANCIS P. NICHOLS, lumberman, Shinglehouse, was born in Sharon township. Potter Co., Penn., October 12, 1846, a son of Maleck and Cordelia (Perry) Nichols, natives of Chemung and Otsego counties, N.Y., respectively, who settled in Sharon township in 1845, and cleared and improved the farm on which they still reside. Francis P. was reared in his native township, where he received a common-school education. He began life as a farmer, and since 1872 has been successfully engaged in the lumber business at Shinglehouse. In 1873 he married Josephine, daughter of Luke and Hannah Stevens, of Sharon township, and they have three children: Harry, Anna and an infant son. Mr. Stevens was a participant in the war of the Rebellion, having enlisted, in 1862, in Company B, One Hundred and Seventy-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, in which regiment he served one year. He again enlisted in 1864, this time in Company K, Thirteenth New York Heavy Artillery, and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. Politically he is a Republican, and has held the office of constable and collector one term in Sharon township.

CHARLES D. PARMENTER, lumberman, Shinglehouse, was born in West Virginia, August 14, 1846, a son of Nelson and Lorinda (White) Parmenter, who settled in Sharon township, in 1850, locating at East Sharon, where the father engaged in lumbering, which he followed until his death. He also cleared and improved a farm at East Sharon. He was a native of the State of New York, and died November 2, 1888, at the age of seventy-five years. His family consisted of four children: Laura (Mrs. Alonzo Newton), Charles, Emma (Mrs. George W. Dodge) and Rose (Mrs. Fred N. Newton). Charles D. Parmenter was reared in Sharon township, and received a common-school education. He has always followed lumbering as a business, and has resided at Shinglehouse since 1884. He married, July 22, 1869, Anna L. Ward, of Ripley, Ohio, and they have one son, Nelson. Mr. Parmenter is a representative citizen and business man of Sharon township. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., and in politics is a Republican.

JOHN S. PEARSALL, farmer, P.O. Shinglehouse, was born in Switzerland county, Ind., January 29, 1821, a son of Samuel and Betsey (Pearsall) Pearsall, who settled in Sharon township in 1829, and later settled on the farm now occupied by John S. Pearsall. His father' s principal business was lumbering, though he farmed to some extent. In later life he removed to Clinton county, Iowa, and died there. His children were Solomon, Harriet (Mrs. William Scott), John S., Polly (Mrs. Alfred Warren) and Nelson. John S. was reared in Sharon township from eight years of age, and with the exception of four years that he lived in Crawford county, Penn., and one year in Iowa he has always made this his home. In 1845 he married Eleanor M., daughter of Ezra and Sophronia Graves, of Sharon township, and they have reared eight children to adult age, three of whom have since died: Theressa (Mrs. Seymour Farley), Helen (Mrs. William Hunt, deceased), Eliza (Mrs. James Thompson), Eva (Mrs. A.C. Voorhees), Lillie (Mrs. Frank Farley), May (Mrs. W.B. Brightman, deceased), Dora (Mrs. M.J. Bridge) and Belle (deceased). Mr. Pearsall was in the Rebellion, enlisting in 1864, in Company F, Two Hundred and Tenth Pennsylvania Volunteers; he participated in the Weldon raid, and was honorably discharged after ten months' service. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Politically he advocates Prohibition.

EDGAR A. PERKINS, lumberman and miller, Shinglehouse, was born in Ceres township, McKean Co., Penn., February 20, 1850, and is a son of Benjamin and Polly (Palmer) Perkins, formerly of Herkimer county, N.Y., and among the early settlers of Ceres township, where they cleared and improved a farm on which they lived and died. They had two children: Isaac (deceased) and Edgar A. The subject of these lines was reared in his native town, where he received a common-school education, and in 1876 he began the business of lumberman at Shinglehouse, where he also erected a grist-mill and a saw-mill, which he has since successfully conducted. He married Lorena, daughter of L.P. and Clarissa (Fisk) White, of Ceres township, and they have one son— Elmo. Mr. Perkins is an enterprising citizen and business man. In politics he is a Republican.

GEORGE W. PRINCE, farmer, P.O. Shinglehouse, was born in Bradford county, Penn., February 22, 1825, a son of Joseph and Hannah (Stiles) Prince, formerly of New Hampshire, and pioneers of Bradford county, Penn. George W. was reared in his native county, where he resided up to 1866. He then settled in Sharon township, Potter county, on the farm he now owns and occupies. His original purchase was 600 acres, a part of which he has since sold and given his sons, and about 200 acres of which he cleared and improved. Mr. Prince was a soldier in the Civil war, enlisting, October 12, 1863, in the United States Construction Corps, served a year and a half, and in the spring of 1865 he was honorably discharged, on account of disability. He married, November 16, 1845, Phebe, daughter of Moses and Jerusha Burbank, of Bradford county, Penn., and they have four children living: Melvina (Mrs. Riley Allen), Loren, Alfred, and Caroline (Mrs. Horace Pratt). Mr. Prince, politically, was formerly a Democrat, but is now a stanch Republican. His paternal grandfather served through the Revolutionary war, and was with Washington when he crossed the Delaware. George W. Prince now has the gun in his possession, carried by his grandfather through the war, and which he captured from a British soldier.

A.A. RAYMOND, hardware merchant, Shinglehouse, was born in Allegheny township, Potter Co., Penn., April 12, 1846, a son of Amos and Rhoda (Daniels) Raymond. His paternal grandfather, Daniel Raymond, was a native of Massachusetts, a pioneer of Allegheny township, where he cleared and improved a farm and lived for many years. He is still a resident of the township, at the ripe age of ninety-six years. Amos Raymond, father of subject, is a farmer by occupation, and a resident of Ulysses township. He reared a family of five children: H. Lovina, Lavina (Mrs. F.D. Leet), Asa A., Josephine (Mrs. Louis Huntington) and Sarah (Mrs. Frank Conable). A.A. Raymond was reared and educated in Allegheny township, and began life as a farmer. He engaged in the mercantile business at Raymond' s Corners, this county, in 1877, where he remained two years, then removed to Lymansville, where he was engaged in business three years. He then kept store two years in Coudersport, and then followed farming two years in Ulysses township. August 15, 1888, he embarked in his present business at Shinglehouse, where he has succeeded in building up a trade that is daily increasing. Mr. Raymond, in 1875, married Mary M., daughter of Harvey and Harriet (Meicham) Cutler, of Bingham township, and they have four children living: Marion C., Daisy D., Dora M. and J. Spafford Raymond; they buried one son, Amos Harvey, when eight months old.

JAMES N. SHERWOOD, farmer, P.O. Shinglehouse, was born in Solon, Cortland Co., N.Y., November 22, 1829, a son of Stratton Sherwood and Barbara A. (Barnard) Sherwood. He was reared in his native county and in Bradford county, Penn. He settled in Sharon township, Potter county, in 1852, and in 1854 married Fannie M., daughter of Joseph Armstrong, of Tompkins county, N.Y. After his marriage he located on Horse run, Bolivar township, Allegany Co., N.Y., and in 1861 removed to the farm he now occupies, most of which he cleared and improved. In August, 1863, he enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and Forty-eight Pennsylvania Regiment. He was wounded in the face at Fort Damnation, and honorably discharged from the service April 10, 1865. During his term of service his wife was a nurse in the Harwood Hospital, near Washington, D.C., and afterward at Fairfax Seminary. Mr. Sherwood is a representative citizen of Sharon township, and is a member of the United Brethren Church. He has held the office of treasurer of Sharon township one year, and politically is a Republican.

SALA C. STEVENS, lumberman, P.O. Shinglehouse, was born in Jamaica, Windham Co., Vt., February 18, 1813, a son of Asa and Patty (Hazelton) Stevens, natives of Vermont and pioneers of Tioga county, Penn. He was reared in Vermont and settled in Sharon township, Potter county, in 1838, embarking in the lumber business, in which he has been very successful and in which he is still interested. He also, for fifteen years, was interested in a large lumber yard and mill in Cincinnati, Ohio, in which he accumulated a competency. Mr. Stevens was twice married. His first wife was Lydia, daughter of Anthony and Katie (Stevens) Jones, of Bingham township, this county, by whom he had children as follows: Fendora M. (Mrs. J.E. Terwilliger), Florence E. (Mrs. Robert Sayers), Florentine S., Grace G. (Mrs. Robert Hook), Edith G. and Mabel (Mrs. Samuel Booth). His second wife was Mrs. Kate (Haley) Seals, of Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. Stevens is a representative and leading citizen of Shinglehouse. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and in politics is a Republican.

WILLIAM G. SUTHERLAND, farmer, P.O. Shinglehouse, was born in Maryland, Otsego Co., N.Y., August 28, 1834, a son of James and Betsey (Kaple) Sutherland, who settled in Sharon township in 1857, and resided there until their death. Their children were Charles, William G., Diantha (Mrs. George M. Burbank), Jane (Mrs. Reuben Hickok), Orburt and Fannie (Mrs. Barton Holly). William G. Sutherland was reared in his native county and Bradford county, Penn. He settled in Sharon township, Potter county, in 1856, on the farm he now occupies, all of which he cleared and improved; for over thirty years he was engaged in lumbering in the winter season. He was twice married; his first wife was Belle, daughter of Orlando and Minerva (Arnold) Johnson, of Hume, N.Y., by whom he had two children: Don and Paul. His present wife was formerly Nancy Kinney, daughter of Alanson Kinney, of Steuben county, N.Y., and they have three daughters: Dora, Ella and Vinnie. Mr. Sutherland has served the township as supervisor and school director. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and is a Republican.

CHARLES D. VOORHEES, M.D., a physician and druggist of Shinglehouse, was born in Sharon township,. Potter Co., Penn., October 6, 1856, a son of John and Cordelia (Fisk) Voorhees. His father was born in Steuben county, N.Y., October 3, 1817, and was a son of Luke and Mary P. (Pellitt) Voorhees, natives of New York and New Jersey, respectively, and pioneers of Howard, Steuben Co., N.Y. John Voorhees was reared in his native county, and remained at home until twenty-one years of age. He then worked by the month on a farm and at building a canal. At the age of twenty-four years he learned the millwright trade in Ceres, N.Y., which trade he followed from 1841 to 1877. He settled in Sharon township in 1849, and located at Shinglehouse in 1852, where he has since resided. His wife, Cordelia, was a daughter of Harvey and Eliza (Campbell) Fisk, formerly of Madison county, N.Y., who settled in Sharon in 1829. The issue of this union was two sons, Adelbert C. and Charles D. Charles D. Voorhees was reared in his native town, where he received his early education, later attending the Pike, N.Y., Seminary. He began life as clerk in a general store, and in the spring of 1876 located at Sharon Centre, where he conducted a general merchandise business one year. He was six months in the grocery trade at Sawyer City, and in 1879 embarked in the drug business at Shinglehouse, which he has successfully continued since. He began the study of medicine in 1885 with Dr. H. A. Place, of Cores, N.Y., and entered the University Medical College, New York City, in September, 1887, and was graduated March 12, 1889, immediately beginning the practice of his profession at Shinglehouse, where he is now located. In 1886 Dr. Voorhees spent six months in Kansas, and conducted a grocery and drug store at Dodge City, and during that time pre-empted 160 acres of land and proved his claim. In September, 1880, he married Jennie B., daughter of Charles and Addie E. (McNamire) Meakinster, of East Sharon, and has one son, Lee G. Dr. Voorhees is a member of the I.O.O.F., and is local agent for the Travelers Life and Accident Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. Politically he is a Republican, and was appointed postmaster August 28, 1889, now serving.

DANIEL P. WHITE, farmer, P.O. East Sharon, was born in Zanesville, Ohio, October 10, 1817, a son of John and Mary (Kennedy) White. His father was a native of New Hampshire and his mother of Elmira, N.Y. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and served under General W.H. Harrison. In 1821 they settled in Ceres, McKean Co., Penn., and later located in Hebron, Potter Co., Penn., where they cleared a farm and made their home until death. They had fourteen children, seven of whom grew to maturity, viz.: Daniel P., Arvilla (Mrs. Peter Pulver), Melinda (Mrs. Noah Dunning), Albert, Levi, Martin (died of disease contracted in the army during the Civil war), and George W. (also a soldier of the Civil war, now living at Ridgway, Penn.). Daniel P. White was reared in Ceres, McKean county, until fifteen years of age, and then moved to Hebron, Potter Co., Penn., with his parents, where he grew to manhood and first located, clearing a farm in that township. In 1859 he removed to Sharon township, where he has since resided. He married, December 24, 1837, Eunice, daughter of Judson Hinds, of Hebron township, and they have reared seven children: Samuel J., Mary J. (Mrs. Hiram Root), Sarah (Mrs. William Waer), William H., Marinda (Mrs. Brown) James and Adelbert. Mr. White was a soldier in the Rebellion, enlisting in August, 1861, in Company D, Eighty-fifth New York Volunteers, and served a year, but was honorably discharged on account of disability, September 1, 1862, at David' s Island, N.Y.

SAMUEL J. WHITE, his eldest son, was also in the service. He was born January 16, 1839; enlisted in September, 1861, in Company C, Eighty-fifth New York Volunteers, and was a prisoner at Andersonville and Florence prisons ten months and eight days. He was honorably discharged at Elmira, N.Y., in June, 1865. He died at his home in East Sharon, August 16, 1889, of disease contracted while in the army; at the time of his death he was serving his fifth term as commander of G.H. Barnes Post, No. 175, G.A.R., his funeral being attended by about 600 persons; he is much missed in county, town and home. In 1866 he was married to Maryette, daughter of Joseph and Mary (Preston) Jones, of Sharon township, and they have six children, viz.: Gertie (Mrs. Alfred Prince), Josie, Ernest, Laphron, Ola and Leon. Mr. White resided on his farm in Sharon township from 1867 until his death. He served his township two terms as school director, and inspector and judge of elections one term. In politics he was a Republican.

CHARLES A. WOLCOTT, farmer, P.O. Shinglehouse, was born in Sharon township, Potter county, May 19, 1861, and is a son of Aaron and Lucretia (Jones) Wolcott. His paternal grandparents were John and Rhoda (Brainard) Wolcott, who settled in Eldred, McKean Co., Penn., in 1833. His maternal grandparents were Anthony W. and Harriet (Nichols) Jones, who settled in Sharon township, Potter county, in an early day. Aaron Wolcott was born in Portville, N.Y., December 9, 1832, and was reared in Eldred, Penn. He settled in Clara township, this county, in 1853, where he engaged in lumbering and farming for three years. He then removed to Sharon township, and has occupied his present farm since 1868. He was twice married, and by his first wife, Lucretia, he has three children living, viz.: Cora (Mrs. Jos. Bump), Charles A. and Hugh. His second and present wife was Mrs. Sarah (Emery) Gile. Charles A. Wolcott was reared in Sharon township, where he received a common-school education. He married, December 25, 1882, Hattie B., daughter of A.W. and Margaret J. (Blood) Humphrey, of Sharon township, and they have one daughter, Ruby. After his marriage Mr. Wolcott engaged in farming one year at Eldred, McKean county, and in the fall of 1883 he returned to Sharon, and in the spring of 1885 located on the farm he now occupies. He has held the office of collector and constable two terms in Sharon. Politically he is a Republican.

OSWAYO TOWNSHIP

SAMUEL BEEBE, pension agent and notary public, Oswayo, was born in Columbus, Chenango Co., N.Y., May 22, 1827, a son of Stephen and Dorcas (Church) Beebe, who settled in Alfred, Allegany Co., N.Y., in 1839, and lived and died there. From eight years of age Samuel Beebe was reared in Allegany county, and was educated in the common schools at Spring Mills, Allegany Co., N.Y. He began life as a farmer, and for six years was proprietor of a woolen factory in Independence, N.Y. In. 1867 he located at Oswayo, and carried on mercantile business for one year, since which time he has been engaged in his present business. In September, 1847, he married Dorothy, daughter of Philo and Mary (Darling) Colvin, of Independence, N.Y. They have six children: Eber J., Gaylord C., Clara A. (Mrs. William L. Campbell), Prentice W., Joel H. and John S. Mr. Beebe was justice of the peace in Independence, N.Y., for twenty years, and filled the same position in Oswayo for fifteen years. He was appointed associate judge of Potter county to fill a vacancy, and served one year; was county auditor three years. Politically he was formerly a Whig, and has been a stanch Republican since the organization of the party.

WILLIAM DALRYMPLE, farmer, P.O. Chrystal, was born in Chenango county, N.Y., December 4, 1826, a son of Ephraim and Abigail (Bridgman) Dalrymple. He was reared in Chemung county, and settled in Oswayo township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1850, locating on a part of the farm he now occupies, most of which he has improved himself, where, with the exception of seventeen years, he has since resided. His father also settled in Oswayo in 1850, and together they embarked in the lumber business, erecting a mill in Oswayo, said to be the first steam saw mill built in Potter county. They did an extensive business until the father's death, April 22, 1856, after which the son carried on the business until 1869, when he embarked in the lumber industry at Wellsville, N.Y., and also ran a sash and blind factory there for five years. He then engaged in the lumber business at Duke Centre, McKean Co., Penn., for seven years, and afterward at Alma, N.Y., for six years. He returned to Oswayo in 1886, where he has since attended to his farm and engaged in lumbering. April 16, 1853, he married Sarah, daughter of Sylvester and Mary (Kirtland) Weeks, of Chemung county, N.Y., and they have three children: Reuben, Arthur and Agnes (Mrs. Chas. Monroe). Mr. Dalrymple is a member of the F. & A.M. and the I.O.O.F.; politically he is a Democrat. Mr. Dalrymple is the owner of the first millstone that ground corn in Chemung county, N.Y., and uses it for a horse block.

JAMES H. DEXTER, farmer and lumberman, P.O. Oswayo, was born in Oswayo township, Potter Co., Penn., March 3, 1858, the only son of William and Lucy M. (Parker) Dexter, natives of Chenango county, N.Y., who settled in Oswayo township in 1854, where his father for many years was a prominent lumberman, but since 1870 has been engaged in farming. James H. was reared in Oswayo, and since attaining his majority has been prominently identified with the lumbering interests of the county, and at the same time has conducted his father's farm. He married in October, 1883, Eloise, daughter of Isaac and Mahala (Casterline) Griffin, of Allegany county, N.Y. Mr. Dexter is a prominent lumberman and citizen of Oswayo. He was, in 1887, elected one of the auditors of Potter county, for a term of three years, and has filled many of the local offices of the township. Politically he is a Republican.

JAMES T. LOCKWOOD, lumberman and farmer, P.O. Chrystal, was born in Steuben county, N.Y., October 31, 1834, a son of William and Laura (Lucas) Lockwood, natives of Vermont, who settled in Oswayo township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1849, locating on the farm now owned by the heirs of Jacob Lockwood. This farm William Lockwood (who in his lifetime was a prominent lumberman) cleared and improved, with the assistance of his sons, making it his home until his death, which occurred in December, 1880. He had ten children: Eliza (Mrs. Hugh Hahey), William L., Mary (Mrs. C.A. Pineo), John, Jacob, Betsy (Mrs. Thomas Crittenden), James T., Joseph, Nancy (Mrs. Martin Fisher), and Wealthy (Mrs. William Woodard). James T. came with his parents to Oswayo township, and on reaching manhood began his business career as a lumberman, which he has since followed, doing an extensive business. In 1871 he located on the farm he now occupies, comprising 145 acres, 115 of which he improved. In 1866 he married Sarah B., daughter of Elias and Electa (Cummings) Torry, of Sharon township, Potter Co., Penn., and to them have been born six children: Mary, Minnie, Jacob J. (deceased), Florence, Lottie and Laura. Mr. Lockwood was a soldier in the Civil war, enlisting August 1, 1861, in Company G, Forty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was wounded through the hip at Atlanta, Ga.; was taken prisoner at the battle of Chancellorsville and sent to Libby prison, but was paroled after fifteen days' confinement. After serving nearly four years, he was honorably discharged July 21, 1865. Politically he is a Republican; has held the office of school director of Oswayo six years, and is now serving his second term as town auditor.

BENJAMIN F. LYMAN, farmer, P.O. Eleven Mile, was born in Castleton, Rutland Co., Vt., March 21, 1822, a son of Eleazer and Mary (Dudley) Lyman. His father settled in Oswayo township in 1855, locating on the farm now owned by his son, Algernon S. Lyman, a part of which he improved, and where he resided until his death. He was twice married, and by his first wife, Mary (Dudley), five children were born: Mary R., Lucy L., Benjamin F., and the twins, Henry H. and Esther M. By his second wife, Mary E. (Hollister), he had five children: Jennie M. (Mrs. Henry Yale), Sarah (Mrs. Walter Wells), Algernon S., Lucretia and Ashbell. Benjamin F. was reared in Vermont, settled in Oswayo in 1855, and in 1858 located on the farm he now occupies, all of which he cleared and improved. He enlisted in the Civil war in October, 1862, in Company H, Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry; was taken prisoner while on picket duty at Harwood Church, Va., and after sixteen days spent in Libby prison was paroled, and was honorably discharged from the service May 29, 1865. He married Sophia, daughter of Samuel Wood, of Fair Haven, Vt., and they have had five children: Mary S. Lyman (dead), Helen (Mrs. Charles Day), Don F., Samuel F. and George H. Mr. Lyman has held nearly all the local offices of the township, was justice of the peace before the war, and is now holding the same office. Politically he is a Republican.

GEORGE F. ROWLEE, farmer, P.O. Oswayo, was born in Southport, Chemung Co., N.Y., April 16, 1828, a son of Peter B. and Elizabeth (Briggs) Rowlee. His father was a native of Connecticut and of Scotch descent, and his mother of Cayuga county, N.Y., and of German parentage. They were residents of Chemung county, N.Y., and died there, both at the age of eighty-two and one-half years. George F. was reared in his native county. In 1850 he settled in Oswayo township, where he has since resided, and in 1851 located on the farm he now occupies, which he cleared and improved himself. He was married, December 31, 1849, to Sophia L., daughter of Ephraim and Abigail (Bridgman) Dalrymple, of Chemung county, N.Y., and they have five children living: Susan A. (Mrs. D.C. Kelley), Sarah I. (Mrs. James F. Goit), Ida V. (Mrs. S.E. Crittenden), George M., and Edith M. (Mrs. Charles L. Wilbur). Mr. Rowlee for many years was engaged in lumbering. In August, 1861, he enlisted in Company G, Sixty-fourth New York Volunteers. He was taken prisoner in the seven days fight before Richmond, June 30, 1862, and after twenty-one days was paroled with McClellan's sick and wounded, and was discharged September 19, 1862. He re-enlisted September 7, 1864, in Company F, Two Hundred and Tenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, served until the close of the war, and was honorably discharged. He has held the offices of supervisor, auditor and school director of Oswayo township. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, Equitable Aid Union, and of the Knights of Labor; politically he is a Democrat.

ANSEL T. SMITH, grocer, Oswayo, was born in Cortland county, N.Y., November 30, 1822, a son of Walker and Sarah (Taylor) Smith, who settled in Ulysses, Potter Co., Penn., in 1838, where they cleared and improved a farm and reared a family of ten children, eight of whom grew to maturity: Ansel T., Arnold W., Parmeno A., Joshua T., Walker O., Sarah A. (Mrs. Sherman Lane), Delana (Mrs. Horace Chandler) and Esther A. (Mrs. Buck). Ansel T. Smith was sixteen years of age when he settled with his parents in Ulysses township. He followed blacksmithing for a number of years, and for eight years was a local preacher of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He located in Oswayo in 1869, where he carried on a blacksmith shop for several years. Since 1886 he has been engaged in the grocery business. He has been twice married; his first wife was Sarah, daughter of John and Sarah Reed, of Eulalia, this county, and they had two children: Nathan L. and William W. His present wife was Savina Brown, of Ulysses. Mr. Smith is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and politically he is a Prohibitionist.

DAVID E. SMITH, stationary engineer, Oswayo, was born in Chenango county, N.Y., April 22, 1847, a son of David D. and Mary B. (Gray) Smith. His father was a native of Rutland, Vt., and his mother of Danbury, Conn. They settled in Oswayo township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1851, where his father engaged in lumbering for two years, then embarked in farming, at which he continued until his death in October, 1863. He was the father of seven children, five of whom grew to maturity, viz.: Thomas, Robert, Joanna (Mrs. James W. Chase), Frederick and David E. David D. Smith cleared a large farm in Oswayo, and during the time made more improvements, considering his means, than any man in the community. He erected, in 1856, the largest barn then in the county, and was a prominent and representative citizen. David E. Smith was reared in Oswayo from five years of age, and received a good common-school education. He has followed the occupation of stationary engineer for twenty years, and, since 1879, has been in the employ of J.J.Lapham & Co., as engineer in their Oswayo tannery. He married, in 1872, Joanna, daughter of James B. and Jane (Steele) Carmer, of Hebron, this county. They have six children: James, Elmer, Gertrude, Mary, Amasa and Jennie. Politically Mr. Smith is independent; he is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

CHRISTOPHER J. TUBBS, furniture dealer, Oswayo, was born in Woodhull, Steuben Co., N.Y., August 29, 1831, a son of Levi and Electa B. (Colvin) Tubbs, natives of Cortland and Herkimer counties, N.Y., respectively, and pioneers of Steuben Co., N.Y. The father of Levi was a native of Vermont. The father of Electa B. Tubbs was born in Rhode Island, and her mother in Connecticut. Christopher J. Tubbs was reared in his native county, where he secured a common school education and learned the carpenter's trade. In 1849 he located in Hector, Potter county, where he worked as a journeyman for four years. He then returned to Steuben county, N.Y., remaining there until August, 1858, when he returned to Ulysses, Potter Co., Penn., and worked on a church until April, 1859, when he went to Conneautville, Crawford Co., Penn., where he worked at his trade until the last of November. He next went to Ceres, McKean county, and worked at his trade until October 17, 1861, when he enlisted in Company F, Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served four years, four months and ten days, and was honorably discharged at Philadelphia February 27, 1866. He then returned to Ceres and worked at his trade one year, then removed to Annin township, McKean county, where he lived three years, thence to Port Allegany, and a year later to Roulette, Potter Co., where he spent seven years. In 1881 he located at Oswayo, where he now resides, and has conducted a furniture store since 1884. He was married, July 4, 1866, to Laura A., daughter of Thomas and Catherine W.H. (Bacon) McDonald, of Sharon, this county, and they have two children: Catherine J. and Lena A. Mr. Tubbs is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the G.A.R., and in politics he is a Republican.

WILLIAM H. TURNER, physician, Oswayo, was born in Elmira, N.Y., October 4, 1829, a son of David and Elizabeth (Atwood) Turner, and is of French and Scotch descent. His parents settled in Bingham township about 1835, where his father purchased a timber lot, erected a saw-mill, and engaged in lumbering for about fifteen years, when he removed to Crawford county, Penn. He died in 1849, of cholera, while on a visit to Iowa. William H. was reared in Bingham township until fifteen years of age. He then located at Whitesville, N.Y., and afterward attended school at Alfred, N.Y., one year. In 1846 he began the study of medicine with Dr. J.G. Horton, of Whitesville, N.Y., and in August, 1849, entered Castleton Medical College, Castleton, Vt., from which he graduated in the spring of 1850. He began the practice of his profession at Ellisburg, this county, in 1852, where he remained one year, and then practiced two years in Oswayo, when he removed to Andrews Settlement in Allegheny township, where he remained until 1871, when he returned to Oswayo, where he has since been in active practice. He was married August 6, 1854, to Spiddie W., daughter of Thomas and Jane (Carson) Gilliland, of Hebron township, and they have five children: Robert, Bennie, Edgar, Emma (Mrs. Frank Gee) and Lizzie. Dr. Turner is a prominent physician, has an extensive practice, and is a member of the Potter county Medical Society. In politics he is a Republican.

WALTER WELLS, general merchant, Oswayo, was born in Oswayo township, Potter Co., Penn., February 25, 1836, a son of John and Polly (Potter) Wells, natives of Petersburg, Rensselaer Co., N.Y., who settled in Oswayo township in 1832. His father was a carpenter by trade, but, after settling in Potter county, spent most of his life in farming and lumbering. He erected a saw-mill in Oswayo, and did an extensive business. His family consisted of four daughters and one son, viz.: Esther (Mrs. Stillman Green), Sardinia (Mrs. Isaac Pierce), Sally Ann (Mrs. Perry Potter), Wealthy (Mrs. Charles H. Simmons) and Walter. Walter Wells was reared in Oswayo, where most of his life has been spent. He began life as a farmer and lumberman, and for twenty-two years has been engaged in the mercantile business at Oswayo. He married, November 13, 1858, Sarah M., daughter of Eleazer and Mary E. (Hollister) Lyman, of Oswayo, formerly of Vermont. They have four children: Arthur G., Ernest L., Myrtle W. and J. Walter. Mr. Wells served as sheriff of Potter county from 1875 to 1878; was postmaster of Oswayo in 1872—73, and from 1879 until the present time, still holding the office. He has held nearly all the local offices of the township. Politically he is a Republican.

GENESEE TOWNSHIP

JOHN H. CARPENTER, general merchant, Genesee Fork, was born in Bingham township, Potter Co., Penn., April 11, 1852, a son of Dorous and Charity (Cuatt) Carpenter, natives of Tompkins county, N.Y., who settled in Bingham township about the year 1829, where the father cleared a good farm on which he lived and died. His children were George, Alva, Betsey (Mrs. Josiah Howe), Harriet (Mrs. Truman Hart), Belinda 1st, Belinda 2d, Michael, Louisa (Mrs. William Lamberson), Theodore, Esther (Mrs. Robert Wilcox), Julia (Mrs. William Scovill) and John H. The subject of this sketch was left an orphan when twelve years of age, and was obliged to rely on his own resources. He started in life working on a farm by the month, at which he continued five years. He then worked a farm on shares in Bingham township one year, and two years in Ulysses. In 1873 he purchased a farm in Allegheny township, most of which he cleared, and where he resided five years, following also butchering in connection with farming. In the spring of 1879 he embarked in mercantile trade at Genesee Forks, carrying on business in what had formerly been a cheese factory, for one year. In 1880 he purchased the property he now occupies, which from time to time he has had to enlarge to accommodate his increasing business. His store-room is now 24x152, and is one of the largest stores, if not the largest, in Potter county. He is an extensive dealer in agricultural implements, harness, buggies, etc. He also deals largely in horses and cattle, and handles nearly every line of merchandise. Mr. Carpenter started in business at Genesee Forks with limited means, but he is a man of push and enterprise, and is deserving of the success he has met with, and the reputation he enjoys of being one of the leading and substantial business men of Potter county. He married in September, 1878, Ida, daughter of Martin Avery, of Hornellsville, N.Y., and they have two children: Grace and Jennie. Mr. Carpenter was postmaster at Genesee Forks for seven years. Politically he is a stanch Republican.

NORMAN CHAPMAN, farmer, P.O. Genesee Fork, was born in Independence, Allegany Co., N.Y., July 22, 1838, a son of Fielder and Sarah (Knight) Chapman, who settled in Genesee township in 1854, where they cleared and improved a farm adjoining that now owned by their son Norman. They reared a family of seven children, viz.: Anson, Norman, Martha (Mrs. John R. Fessenden), Cemantha (Mrs. Josiah Webster), Percis (Mrs. J.J. Waterman), Ladurney and Ethlin. Fielder Chapman was born in Onondaga county, N.Y., November 15, 1811, and was a son of Samuel and Martha (Tyler) Chapman, natives of Connecticut, who settled in Independence, Allegany Co., N.Y., in 1824. He was married, June 24, 1835, to Sarah, daughter of Silas and Anna Knight, of Steuben county, N.Y., and, as above stated, settled in Genesee in 1854. Norman Chapman was reared in Independence and Genesee townships, and has always followed farming as an occupation. He has occupied his present farm four years. He was married, March 11, 1868, to Cordelia, daughter of John and Prudence Kruson, of Allegany Co., N.Y., and they have two children—Bertie and Guy. Mr. Chapman was a soldier in the late war, enlisting August 16, 1862, in Company K, One Hundred and Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served nearly three years. He was wounded at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863, and was honorably discharged from the service in July, 1865. He is a prominent farmer and citizen, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and of the Sons of Temperance. In politics he is a Prohibitionist.

BARNA DANIELS, farmer, P.O. Keech, was born in Bingham township, Potter Co., Penn., September 12, 1828, a son of George W. and Achsah (Hawley) Daniels, formerly of Broome county, N.Y., who settled in Bingham township in March, 1828. His father was a prominent and representative farmer, cleared and improved three farms in Bingham township, and lived and died there. He had fifteen children: Charles, Olive (Mrs. James Ardrey), Lydia A. (Mrs. Levi Quimby), Barna, Joseph W., Ruth (Mrs. George W. Gurnsey), Nathan H., Betsey J.(Mrs. Lester M. Crum), Harriet E. (Mrs. Lester Dingman), Silas, Sarah (Mrs. Thomas Morrison), Emma (Mrs. Charles Gridley), Ezra, William and John. Barna Daniels was reared in Bingham township, and in 1852 purchased the land in Genesee he now occupies, and on which he settled in 1857, and which he cleared and improved himself. He married, July 4, 1855, Julia H., daughter of Willis and Sarah (Grover) Young, of Ulysses township, this county, and to them have been born three children: Rosalie (Mrs. Gaylord Crum), Adell (Mrs. W.D. Smith), and Fannie (deceased). Mr. Daniels has held the offices of school director and judge of election. He is a Democrat in politics, and one of the enterprising and representative farmers of Genesee township.

IRA E. EASTON, farmer, P.O. Genesee Fork, was born in Madison county, N.Y., January 6, 1846, a son of Resolved and Rosina (Payne) Easton. His paternal grandfather was Theophilus Easton, a native of Providence, R.I., who was among the early settlers of Genesee township, and cleared and improved the farm now owned by William Cobb, on which he resided for many years. He is now a resident of Bingham township, and is in the ninety-seventh year of his age. His children were Resolved, Orpha (Mrs. D. Buckley), Joseph, Delighta (Mrs. Ira Robbins), Asia A. (Mrs. Graham Hurd), Cornelia (Mrs. Urial Sherman), Lincoln, William, Henry, James, John, Emeline (Mrs. A. Amidon) and Harriet (Mrs. Henry Merritt). Of these Resolved was a native of Rhode Island, and lived for a number of years in Madison county, N.Y. He settled in Genesee, Potter Co., Penn., in 1856, and was engaged in farming up to 1883, when he retired. His children were four in number, viz.: Louisa (Mrs. W.L. Roberts), Adeline (Mrs. John Leet), Ira E. and Maryette (Mrs. Colonel Cady). Ira E. Easton was reared in Genesee from nine years of age, and has always been a farmer. He married, July 4, 1867, Eliza J., daughter of Harry and Jane (Pye) Hurd, of Genesee township, and to them have been born four children: Gertrude, Maud, Esther A. and Harry. Mr. Easton is a member of the Knights of Honor and of the Equitable Aid Union. He has held most of the minor offices of the township, and is now serving his second term as justice of the peace. Politically he is a Democrat.

OLIVER W. HICKOX, farmer, P.O. Genesee Fork, was born in Windsor, Broome Co., N.Y., February 18, 1811, a son of Thomas and Hannah (Wolcott) Hickox, natives of Connecticut and Massachusetts, respectively, who were among the early settlers of Broome county, N.Y. Oliver W. Hickox was reared in his native town, and there married Harriet, daughter of Andrew and Hannah (Cole) Moore, early settlers of that county, and grand-daughter of William Moore, a native of Schenectady, N.Y., and one of the pioneers of Broome county, N.Y. The issue of this union was five children: Willard, Ansel, Hannah (Mrs. F.B. Sherman), Sarah (Mrs. Volney Stannard) and Josephine. Mr. Hickox located in Tioga county, Penn., in 1837, and one year later he proceeded to Portville, N.Y., where he remained two years. In 1841 he removed to Friendship, N.Y., where he lived three years, and then lived seven years in Belmont, N.Y., and after another year's residence in Friendship located in Genesee township, this county, about 1852, where he has since resided. For several years he was engaged in lumbering, and cleared and improved the farm he now occupies. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Politically he has always been a Democrat, and has held several of the local offices of the township.

WILLARD HICKOX, farmer, P.O. Genesee Fork, was born in Windsor, Broome Co., N.Y., February 9, 1837, a son of Oliver W. and Harriet (Moore) Hickox, who settled in Genesee township, Potter Co., Penn., about 1851. He came to Genesee with his parents, received a common-school education, and after attaining his majority began life as a farmer and lumberman, and from 1861 to 1866 was located at Titusville, Penn., where he followed teaming, and was also an inspector of oil. Since 1866, with the exception of two years, he has resided in Genesee township. In 1869 he located on the farm he now occupies, most of which he cleared, and made all improvements in buildings. In May, 1861, he married Phebe, daughter of Samuel and Charity (Thompson) Hurd, of Genesee township. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, the Equitable Aid Union and of the Sons of Temperance. In politics he is a Democrat, and has, held most of the offices of the township.

BRYAN McGINNIS, farmer, P.O. Shongo, N.Y., was born in Ireland in 1839, came with his parents to Boston in 1842, and in 1845 removed to Angelica, Allegany Co., N.Y., thence to Wellsville, and eventually located in Genesee township at the Irish settlement. His father's family consisted of seven boys and four girls; both parents are deceased. Bryan made his home with his parents until 1860, when he married Helen Moran, daughter of Martin Moran, the first Irish settler of Genesee township, where the newly married pair also located and engaged in farming. Their children were Dennis (who was killed by lightning August 23, 1883), Maggie (now Mrs. John Chapel of Ulysses), Frank H., James, Benny, Conny and Clare. Mr. and Mrs. McGinnis are both members of the Catholic Church. Mr. McGinnis enlisted in the war of the Rebellion, in Company D, One Hundred and Seventieth New York Volunteers, but was discharged on account of disability. He is a member of Estes Post, No. 125, G.A.R. In politics he is a Democrat; was elected county commissioner in 1884, and re-elected in 1887. He has been supervisor of Genesee township nine successive years, poormaster, eight years, and secretary of the school-board seven years.

HERBERT O. PERRY, woolen manufacturer, Genesee Forks, was born in Vermont, July 22, 1814, a son of John and Margaret (Wade) Perry. He was reared in Manlius, N.Y., where he worked in a cotton factory nine years. From there he went to Pratt's Hollow, Madison Co., N.Y., in 1832, and was there superintendent of a cotton-mill until 1848, and six years of that time had an interest in the mill. In 1848 he settled in Genesee township, Potter Co., Penn., and erected a woolen factory in what at that time was a wilderness, and this he has conducted ever since. During the war he employed eight hands, but since 1870 has employed but four in the busy season. For five years he conducted a grocery in connection with his woolen factory, and in the first years of his settlement did considerable business in pine lumber. He was married, March 8, 1835, to Rebecca, daughter of Robert and Phebe (Peet) Dunbar, early settlers of Eaton, Madison Co., N.Y., and they have had four children: Harriet H. (Mrs. Benjamin Noble), Emeline (deceased), Margaret (deceased) and Herbert A. Mr. Perry is a Republican in politics, and has filled several of the minor offices of the township.

BENJAMIN F. SHERMAN, farmer and produce dealer, P.O. Genesee Fork, was born in Steuben Co., N.Y., January 20, 1840, a son of Thomas W. and Sophronia (Hurd) Sherman, who settled in Genesee township, Potter Co., Penn., in 1856, where they resided until their death. They had nine children: Phebe (Mrs. Wm. H. Jones), Benjamin F., Ellen (Mrs. Chauncey Gilber), Thomas J., Henry, Walter, Mary (Mrs. Edwin Caple), Caroline (Mrs. Norman Keech) and Samuel S. Benjamin F. Sherman in early manhood was a jobber in lumber, and from 1858 to 1862 was engaged in farming in Bingham township. He then located at Titusville, Penn., where he was engaged in various branches, including real estate and oil producing, for six years. In 1868 he purchased the farm he now occupies, in Genesee township, where he has since resided, and which he cleared and improved. He has also been more or less engaged in lumbering and in the live-stock business, and since 1884 he has made a specialty of the butter business, which averages from two to three tons per month, to supply his customers. In December, 1863, he married Hannah, daughter of Oliver W. and Harriet (Moore) Hickox, of Genesee, and they have two children: Charles W. and Harriet S. (Mrs. G.C. Russell). Mr. Sherman has held the office of mercantile appraiser, and was census enumerator for the townships of Genesee and Oswayo in 1880. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and also belongs to the Knights of Honor and the Knights of the Maccabees. In politics he is a Republican.

JEROME J. WATERMAN, proprietor of the Waterman House, Genesee Forks, was born in Oneida county, N.Y., June 19, 1842, a son of Artemas and Amanda (Worden) Waterman. His father died when Jerome was a child, and his mother afterward married William F. Smith. In 1852 his mother and stepfather settled in Genesee township, Potter Co., Penn., on the farm now owned by Mr. Waterman, which they cleared and improved. Of this family there was, besides Jerome J., one daughter, Julia A., now Mrs. John S. Atherton. Jerome J. Waterman was reared in Genesee township from ten years of age. He was in the late war of the Rebellion, enlisting in June, 1861,in Company H, Thirty-seventh New York Infantry. He was shot through the cheek at the battle of Fair Oaks, in 1862, and was wounded in the left leg at the battle of Chancellorsville, in May, 1863. He was honorably discharged, on account of expiration of term of enlistment, in June, 1863; reenlisting January 31, 1864, in Company D, Fiftieth Wisconsin Infantry, he served one year and four months, and was again honorably discharged. After the war he engaged in farming in Genesee township, and in 1871 purchased the homestead farm which he still owns and on which he resided for seventeen years. In 1887 he erected the Waterman House at Genesee Forks, of which he has since been the popular landlord. In 1866 he married Percis, daughter of Fielder and Sarah (Knight) Chapman, of Genesee township, and they have one son, William D. Mr. Waterman is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the G.A.R. He has served one term as justice of the peace of Genesee, and in politics is a Republican.

Source: Page(s) 1179-1197 History of Counties of McKean, Elk and Forest, Pennsylvania. Chicago, J.H. Beers & Co., 1890.
Transcribed February 2006 by Carol Eddleman Published 2006 by PA-Roots