Biographies from Historical and Biographical Annals by Morton Montgomery

QUIER, EDWIN ADDAMS

p. 713

Surnames: QUIER, ADDAMS, MCHOSE, CAMPBELL, HAWLEY, RITTER

Edwin Addams Quier has passed practically all his live in Reading, where he was born Aug. 14, 1869, son of Levi and Emma (Addams) Quier.

Levi Quier has been a prominent business man in Reading for many years. Born at Rittersville, in Lehigh county, Pa., March 11, 1835, he was there educated in the public schools, and upon the opening of his active years learned the business of constructing blast furnaces for the manufacture of iron, under his uncles, Isaac and Samuel McHose, who were well known furnace builders of Lehigh county. After that experience he served for five years as bookkeeper and paymaster for the Allentown Iron Company, and then from 1859 to 1861 was engaged in the construction of blast furnaces, one of them being at Richmond, Va. Meantime his patriotism had become aroused by the stirring events of the Civil war period, and in the latter part of 1861 he assisted in organizing a company at Allentown for the Union service-Company K, 54th Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was commissioned first lieutenant, and served with that rank until January, 1864, when he was appointed quartermaster of the regiment, continuing in that position until he received his honorable discharge from the service, in September, 1864. By special detachment he served as recruiting officer at different places, and later as quartermaster on the staff of Gen. J. M. Campbell, participating especially in the campaigns in the Shenandoah valley.

At the conclusion of his military service Mr. Quier located at Reading, where he became interested in the manufacture of fire brick, securing an interest in the firm of McHose & Thompson, of which his uncle, Isaac McHose, was the senior partner. This was in the year 1865, and throughout the forty and more years intervening since that time he has continued his connection with the works, which during all this time have been under his direct management, and of which he is now practically the sole owner.

In 1868 Mr. Quier married Emma Addams, daughter of Reuben E. Addams, of Reading, formerly of Ontelaunee township, Berks county and to them has been born one son, Edwin Addams. Mr. and Mrs. Quier were members of the First Reformed Church of Reading until the organization of St. Paul's Memorial Reformed Church, in 1872, when they withdrew from their original connection to assist in the establishment of the new congregation, of which they have since been active members. He was one of the building committee of the church, serving as secretary of that body, and he and his uncle, Isaac McHose, are now the only surviving members of that committee. For over twelve years following the organization of the congregation, Mr. Quier officiated as deacon and trustee.

Though he is best known in business circles as a manufacturer of fire brick, Mr. Quier has been identified with the management of the National Union Bank for twenty years, during which time he has served as a member of the board of directors; he co-operated with other enterprising capitalists of Reading in establishing the electric light and power plant, and the steam heat plant, for supplying the community with light, power and heat-all of which projects have been very successful, demonstrating their utility so that they have been highly appreciated in the community. Mr. Quier has always been a public-spirited man, and he represented the First ward as one of the Republican school controllers in the board of controller's from 1878 to 1882.

Edwin Addams Quier received his early education in the Reading public schools, graduating from the high school in 1885. He then entered Lehigh University, graduating from that institution in 1891, after a course in analytical chemistry. Upon his return to Reading, after graduation, he secured an interest in the Reading Fire Brick Works, with which his father has so long been connected, and he has since been identified with that important industrial concern. He has served as secretary and later as treasurer, and has proved himself a success in business as well as in professional work.

In 1895, Mr. Quier was married to Helen Hawley, daughter of Jesse G. and Kate (Ritter) Hawley, and they have had three children; Hawley, Catherine and Edith. Mr. Quier is a member of St. Paul's Memorial Reformed Church, and his wife is connected with Christ P. E. Church.

Upon the death of Mr. Jesse G. Hawley, who was the owner of the Reading Eagle, the leading newspaper publication of Reading, the Reading Eagle Company was incorporated, and Mr. Quier was chosen vice-president, in which capacity he as since assisted in the management of the publication.


QUIMBY FAMILY

p. 1006

Surnames: QUIMBY, JEFFERSON, McDOWEL, STRUNK, GUILEY, KLINGER, ADAMS, STONE, SHUNK, EDWARDS

Quimby, (I) Elijah Quimby is the first of the family of whom there is definite knowledge, and he was a farmer of Maryland, where he was born, and where he lived, died and is buried. During his lifetime he became possessed of a large plantation, and was a man of prominence in his community. His wife's Christian name was Sarah and she bore him these children: Elijah, who lived in Maryland; William, who lived in Philadelphia; Benjamin, who lived on the eastern shore of Maryland; Sprey, who settled in California; and Sarah, who married Enos Jefferson, of Wilmington, Delaware.

(II) John Quimby, son of Elijah Quimby, was born in Maryland in 1812, and died in 1863, aged fifty-one years. In 1840 he came to Reading where he died and he is buried in the Charles Evans cemetery. Being a carpenter by trade, he found plenty of work in Reading and for some time followed boat building. He was a man of considerable education, and taught school on Franklin street, meeting with success in this profession. All of his life he had been a devout Christian, and finally was ordained a preacher, and was made chaplain of the 93d Pa. V. I. during the Civil war. Later in life he proved pipes at the rolling mills and was an earnest, conscientious worker. He was a man who never willingly wronged a single person but sought to do only good, and his memory is still cherished by those who knew him. John Quimby was active in public life and served as alderman of the old Southeast ward, and had his office under the old Mansion House. When his country called upon him for his services, Mr. Quimby nobly responded and organized companies and enrolled men before he himself went to the front as the spiritual guide of his regiment. Early in its history he became a member of Chandler Lodge No. 227, F. & A. M., and at the time of his enlistment was its Senior Warden. He was also active in Montgomery Lodge No. 59, I. O. O. F., and filled a number of its offices. John Quimby married Sarah McDowel, 1811-1861, daughter of Elijah McDowel, of Wilmington. Their children were: William M.; Henry died at Reading; James died in the army hospital at Washington; Laura married Henry Strunk, deceased; Samuel resides at New Castle, Pa.; John resides at Reading; and Thomas resides at Chester, Pennsylvania.

(III) William M. Quimby, son of John Quimby and father of Allen G. Quimby, is a retired resident of Reading and a veteran of the Civil war. He was born in Wilmington, Del., May 1, 1834. When quite a young man he learned the molder's trade at Johnson's foundry and machine shops at Reading, where he came in 1840. He worked at these shops for ten years, and then became an employe of the Reading Hardware Company, and worked for them for more than a quarter of a century, retiring in 1907 after the death of his wife. He now resides with his son, Allen G. Quimby, being an honored member of that household. Mr. Quimby was a very prominent man, and took part in many enterprises looking toward the betterment of Reading. He was an organizer of the Liberty Fire Company No. 6, of Reading, and served as its chief hose director, was assistant engineer, and filled other offices therein. He is a member of the Iron Molders Union, of Veteran Castle, K. G. E., and of the K. of P. For years he served as trustee of St. Peter's Methodist Church, of which he is a consistent member and generous contributor, and he has always taken a deep interest in the church and all its work.

On Sept. 12, 1862, Mr. Quimby enlisted in Company G, 20th Pa. V. I., was made a corporal, at Harrisburg, and during the time he served he was a brave soldier. On March 22, 1857, he married Lavina E. Guiley, daughter of John and Mary (Klinger) Guiley of Reading. Mr. Guiley was a son of a Hessian soldier who came from Hesse-Darmstadt during the Revolution. Mrs. Quimby was born Feb. 17, 1838, and died April 26, 1907, aged sixty-nine years, two months and nine days. Mr. and Mrs. Quimby celebrated their golden anniversary about one month before she died, and no one enjoyed the pleasant affair more than she. Her children all attended and she was the center of attraction. To Mr. and Mrs. Quimby were born these children: James H., of Newcastle, Del., who is superintendent of the Brylgon Steel Casting Company; Allen G.; Mary K., who married John H. Adams, of No. 137 North Eighth street, Reading.

(IV) Allen G. Quimby, superintendent for the American Coke & Gas Construction Company of New York, with foundry located at Reading, is a native of the city, having been born here Nov. 2, 1866. He was educated in the public schools of Reading, and when but thirteen years of age began learning the molder's trade at Johnson's Foundry and Machine shops. After completing his term of years, he traveled considerably, working at Peoria, Ill., and other western cities, gaining considerable valuable experience at his trade. When only eighteen he was a master of the trade, something very remarkable. Later he located at Chester and worked for the Standard Steel Casting Company, but in 1899 he returned to his native city and began working at the Scott works branch of the Reading Iron Company. In 1900 he took charge of the Penn Iron Works, and when his company sold its plant to the American Coke & Gas Construction Company, in 1904, he continued with the new combination. At present he has charge of over 100 skilled mechanics. His home is pleasantly located at No. 137 North Eighth street. In politics Mr. Quimby is a Republican, and is very active in party work. He was chairman of the Third ward for nine consecutive years; was a State delegate when Hon. William A. Stone was nominated for governor of Pennsylvania, and he has always taken a deep interest in city politics as well. Socially Mr. Quimby is a member of Chandler Lodge No. 227, F. & A. M., of which he has been past master since 1900; Excelsior Chapter No. 237, R. A. M.; Reading Commandery No. 42, K. T.; Rajah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., and a member of the Arab Patrol. He belongs to Meade Camp No. 16, Sons of Veterans, and to Liberty Fire Co. No. 6, Reading. He was active in the Friendship Fire Co. No. 5, and was its vice president for some years. In addition to these other societies, Mr. Quimby was active in the Iona Pioneer Corps, a temperance society, and served as its secretary, treasurer, and first and second lieutenant. He and his family are connected with the Baptist Church.

On July 27, 1886, Mr. Quimby was married to Sallie A. Shunk, daughter of Peter and Sarah (Edwards) Shunk of Reading. Peter Shunk is a grandson of the late Gov. Francis A. Shunk of Pennsylvania. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Quimby-William McDowel, a skilled draughtsman of Reading, and a very promising young man; Lavinia E., a graduate of Deck Business Academy.


QUINTER, F. H.

p. 1199

Surnames: QUINTER, ULRICH, POTTS, RIDER, BECHTEL, HIMMELREICH, YOUNG, MOSER, FLICKINGER, MYERS, EISENHOWER

F. H. Quinter, proprietor of a shoe store located at No. 950 Chestnut street, Reading, has only followed a family custom in choosing his occupation, for his father and grandfather before him had been shoemakers.

The paternal grandfather, Peter Quinter, combined farming and shoemaking. He married (first) a Miss Ulrich, by whom he had four children, viz.: Joseph; Jeremiah; Ellen, wife of David Rider; and Mary M., Mrs. William Potts. By a second union to Miss Susan Bechtel, there was an only child, William B. Peter Quinter died in 1866, in the Lutheran faith.

William B. Quinter followed his father's trade and during most of his lifetime was established at Lorane. He married Miss Sarah Himmelreich, and they had a family of seven children as follows: Mary, Mrs. Nathaniel Young; Agnes, Mrs. Henry Moser; Ella, Mrs. Joseph Flickinger; F. H.; Calvin; John; and William. The mother died in 1876, aged thirty-six, while Mr. Quinter died at Stowe, in 1896, at the age of sixty-six years.

He was politically an adherent of the Republican party.

F. H. Quinter was born in Lorane in the State of Pennsylvania in January, 1860. He grew up in Berks county, receiving his education in the public schools, and learning the shoemaker's trade from his father. At the age of twenty he went to Geigertown and for three years worked there with a Mr. Hoffman. In 1883 he located in Reading and bought the property where he still carries on his business. The store building now in use was on the property at the time, and Mr. Quinter put in a good stock of shoes, boots and rubbers. He has done well from the beginning, has a thriving trade and has won the entire esteem of the community by his honest business methods.

In the same year of his removal to Reading, Mr. Quinter was married on Jan. 25, to Miss Rebecca Myers, who died in 1891 at the age of thirty-two years. Two years later in 1893, he married Miss Alice Eisenhower, by whom he has two daughters, Sarah Alma and Norma Marion. Mr. Quinter, with his family, belongs to Grace Lutheran Church, of Reading, while fraternally he is a member of the Royal Arcanum. While the management of his business has left him no time to mingle actively in politics, he is a loyal supporter of the Republican party.

Last Modified Thursday, 16-Oct-2008 20:56:43 EDT

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