Biographies from Historical and Biographical Annals by Morton Montgomery

LUCKENBILL, CYRUS

p. 1253

Surnames: LUCKENBILL, KLINE, ROTHERMEL, HECKMAN, WINK, De TURK, MENGEL, STETZLER, MUNTZ

Cyrus Luckenbill, one of the good, practical farmers of Berks county, at present carrying on operations in Perry township, was born Dec. 24, 1847, in this township, not far from the village of Virginville, son of Thomas Luckenbill.

The progenitor of the family was Johan Tost Luckenbill, who came from Germany on the ship Thistle, landing at Philadelphia, Sept. 20, 1730. It is believed that he and his wife were buried at Bowers Church in the aforesaid township, and it is traditional that he was married when he came to America, that his wife was a Swiss, and that he came from that part of Germany that bounds Switzerland. He had two sons, Christian and Abraham, the latter of whom is said to have settled in Schuylkill county. In 1759 he was a taxpayer in Rockland township, and he later moved across the line into Maxatawny township.

Christian Luckenbill, grandfather of Cyrus, was born in 1767, and died about 1852. He was married to Catherine Kline, of Maxatawny township, and they had these children: Thomas; David, who settled in Jefferson county, Pa.; Benjamin, who settled in Iowa; Elizabeth, m. Jacob Rothermel; and a daughter, m. Mr. Heckman.

Thomas Luckenbill was born in Perry township in 1800, and died there in 1863. He was a farmer and owner of the Luckenbill homestead, and was a school director and useful citizen. His wife was Annie Wink, daughter of John Wink, of Maxatawny township, and ten children were born to this union: Augustus; Edwin; Lucy, who died in infancy; James; Thomas; Sarah; Jacob; Simon; Alfred and Cyrus.

Cyrus Luckenbill was educated in the common schools of his native township, which he attended until twenty-one years of age, when he located on his present farm, on which he has been engaged to the present time. It consists of 195 acres of well cultivated land, well supplied with substantial and modern buildings, and the latest, most up-to-date machinery. His residence is one of the fine ones of the section, and around it during the summer months great masses of roses grow, making it one of the beautiful sights of the locality. Mr. Luckenbill is also the fortunate possessor of a fine orchard. He is a progressive, enterprising agriculturist, and well deserves the success which has attended his efforts. Mr. Luckenbill is greatly interested in educational matters, and has been a school director of a number of years. He and his wife attend the Zion's Lutheran Church, of which he has been a trustee for three years.

Mr. Luckenbill was married May 15, 1880, to Susan De Turk, daughter of John and Susan (Mengel) De Turk, and to this union thirteen children have been born: Cora, m. Jeremiah Stetzler; John T.; Nicholas P.; Even C., m. Clara Muntz; Annie B.; Howard C.; Lucy F.; Mary L.; Robert G.; Jerry G.; Minnie E., who died in infancy; Nevin J.; and Lovie May, who died when less than two years of age.


LUCKENBILL, THOMAS

p. 1551

Surnames: LUCKENBILL, WINK, DEIBERT, DIVERT, WEBER, LENGEL, WEST, KLINE, BECKER, HEINLY, ADAM, HELLER, LESHER, MAURY, DeTURK, FOLK

Thomas Luckenbill, a retired farmer of Perry township, who for many years carried on operations here, is a native of Berks county, born in Greenwich township, March 7, 1836, son of Thomas and Anna (Wink) Luckenbill.

Johan Ekel Luckenbill, the ancestor of this family in America, emigrated from Germany, near the Swiss boundary, on the ship "Thistle," which landed at Philadelphia Aug. 29, 1730. On the same ship was one Hendrick Luckenbill, and it is traditional that these two pioneers were brothers. Johan E. Luckenbill had eight children: (1) Maria m. Michael Deibert or Divert, and settled in Schuylkill county. (2) Heinrich m. Catherine Weber, who tradition says was of Swiss extraction. In 1759 he was a taxable resident of Maxatawny township, Berks county, owning land in the vicinity of Bowers. He removed later to Wayne township, Schuylkill county, and shortly before his death became totally blind. His children were: Adam, Henry, Solomon, George, Susanna, Sophia, Rebecca and Beckie. (3) Abraham m. Eva Lengel, and had these children: John, Abraham, Jonas, Emanuel, Kate, Rebecca, Sallie and Eva. (4) John m. Polly West and had two children: Isaac and Mary. (5) Andraes m. Miss Lengel and their children were: George, Joel, Sallie, Judith, Diana and Maria. (6) Christian. (7) George, of whose history no records are in evidence. (8) Another son whose name is unknown.

Christian Luckenbill, son of Johan Ekel, lived in Berks county for some years, but in 1790 he and a brother, George, were taxable residents of Manheim township, Schuylkill county. His date of birth, number of children and date and place of death are not known, but it is traditional that after 1800 he returned to Berks county, and was buried at Bowers Church in Maxatawny township, where he had a farm.

Christian Luckenbill, grandfather of Thomas W., was an extensive farmer, owning 407 acres of land, and built the house and barn on the homestead, in the vicinity of which he was well and favorably known. He was married to Catherine Kline, of Maxatawny township, (born Nov. 13, 1780, died April 20, 1854) , and they had five children: Thomas, Leah, Elizabeth, Benjamin and David.

Thomas Luckenbill, son of Christian, was born in 1800, and died at the age of sixty-three years. He lived in Greenwich township above Lenhartsville for four years before locating, in 1835, on the old homestead which consisted of 254 acres. He was an upright and honest citizen and an elder of Zions Union Church, of the Reformed denomination. Mr. Luckenbill was married in 1830 to Anna Wink, daughter of Jacob Wink, and to this union there were born children as follows: Augustus, died aged ten years ; Edwin m. Sophia Becker ; James m. Eliza Heinly ; Thomas ; Sarah Ann m. Simon Adam ; Louisiana died in infancy ; Jacob m. Mary Heller ; Simon m. Elizabeth Lesher ; Alfred m. Mary Maury ; and Cyrus m. Susanna DeTurk.

Thomas Luckenbill obtained a good education, first attending pay and later public schools for several winters, and then worked on his fathers farm until thirty years of age. In 1868 he bought the homestead and began farming on his own account, at which he successfully continued until 1882, when he retired and rented his farm. It consists of 140 acres of good fertile soil. Politically Mr. Luckenbill is a Democrat, and a strong party man, attending county conventions of his party, serving as delegate from his district and in many ways proving his public spirit. Among other trusts given to the care of Mr. Luckenbill was the guardianship of the four children of Simon Adam, namely: Thomas F., whose son Wilson J., lives on Mr. Luckenbills farm and who married a Miss Mengel, by whom he has had a daughter, Mabel Louise ; Cyrus ; Simon and Annie.

Mr. Luckenbill was married Feb. 1, 1868, to Angeline Heinly, daughter of Jacob D. and Polly (Folk) Heinly, and granddaughter of Johannes Heinly. No children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Luckenbill.


LUCKENBILL, THOMAS R.

p. 1466

Surnames: LUCKENBILL, WINK, ADAM, DREIBELBIS, BUSHEY

Thomas R. Luckenbill of Virginville, Richmond Township, is engaged in the butcher business, and has a large trade in first class meats among the residents of this section. Mr. Luckenbill was born in Perry Township, son of Simon Luckenbill. The great-grandfather of Thomas R. Luckenbill was Christian Luckenbill, one of the earlier settlers of Perry Township, a farmer by occupation, and an owner of some land. It is probable that he was one of the sons of Johan Ekel Luckenbill, who was emigrated to this country from Germany on the ship "Thistle," which landed at Philadelphia Aug 29, 1730. He had with him his brother Hendrick, and these two are the progenitors of the Luckenbill family in this country. Thomas Luckenbill, one of the sons of Christian, was a farmer and land owner of Perry Township, and owned the 200 acre tract that later belonged to Thomas, his son. He married a Miss Wink of Maxatawny Township, and they had these children: Edwin; James; Thomas; Alfred; Simon; Jacob, who died at the age of forty-five years; Cyrus; and Sarah Ann, wife of Simon Adam, deceased.

Simon Luckenbill, father of Thomas R., owned a farm of 96 acres of good land in Perry township, about two and one half miles west of Virginville. He stands high in his community and is a member of Zion's Reformed Church of Perry Township. Although a stanch Democrat, he had never had a desire to hold office. His children are: Samuel of Virginville; Thomas R.; Sarah Ann, m. to F. F. Dreibelbis, a grain and coal and lumber dealer of Virginville; Simon who died at the age of six years; and Augustus, a clerk of Hamburg, Pennsylvania.

Thomas R. Luckenbill was reared on his father's farm in Perry township, and worked for him until twenty years of age. He was equipped mentally by study in the common schools of his native township, and by personal application at home at leisure hours. After leaving his father, he worked for three years in a creamery, and later, with F. F. Dreibelbis, formed the firm of Dribelbis and Luckenbill, engaging in the manufacture of brick for three years, when the firm was dissolved by mutual consent. In 1886, Mr. Luckenbill engaged in butchering, and this he has continued successfully ever since. He owns a large brick house in Virginville, and seventeen acres of excellent farm land, on which he raises feed for his horses and cattle.

Mr. Luckenbill was married in 1891 to Louisa, daughter of David and Catherine (Adam) Bushey of Richmond Township, and to this union were born: Edna, Carrie, Curtis, Paul, Mable and Thomas. The family are members of the United Evangelical Church of Virginville. In politics Mr. Luckenbill is a Democrat, but is not a politician or an office seeker. He is a plain, practical business man. By honesty and fair dealing, he has built up a paying business, is a good citizen, and is well thought of in his community by those who know him best. He is truly a representative citizen of Richmond Township, Berks County.


LUDEN, WILLIAM H.

p. 768

Surnames: LUDEN, KISSINGER, RITTER, SHEARER, MUSSER, BAILEY, ETZEL, MARSH, BENSON

Picture of William LudenWilliam H. Luden, prosperous manufacturing confectioner since 1879, with a national reputation in his branch of business, was born at Reading March 5, 1859, and received his education in the local schools. In 1879, before he was of age he began manufacturing candy in limited quantities and disposed of it successfully, which encouraged him to continue. This modest start in business life was made at No. 37 North Fifth street, where he was brought up and where his father had carried on the jewelry business. He continued there ten years, gradually increasing his production of various confections, and then moved into larger quarters which he had secured at the northeast corner of Sixth and Washington streets, and equipped with improvements to meet the demands of his trade. He occupied the entire building (four stories), employed nearly one hundred and fifty hands, and worked up a car- load of sugar weekly, and by this time his trade had come to reach out into the Eastern, Middle and Southern States. By the year 1900 his trade was developed to still greater proportions, so that he was again obliged to secure larger quarters, and he accordingly purchased a property on North Eight street, beyond Walnut, with a siding extended from the Philadelphia & Reading railroad, where he erected a substantial and commodious four-story brick structure (165 feet front and 110 feet deep) and supplied it with all the necessary improvements and appurtenances for his business and employes. The building was dedicated with appropriate ceremonies in June of that year, and the enterprising proprietor was given many earnest congratulations. And here, too, his business kept on increasing year after year until 1909, when he enlarged the building by erecting a four-story addition at the south end, 60 feet front and 110 feet deep, making his establishment altogether 225 feet front and 110 feet deep and one of the prominent industrial enterprises of Reading. He now employs between four hundred and five hundred hands constantly and produces all kinds of confections, in large quantities, which are shipped to all parts of the United States. During the last several years, his establishment has made a specialty of "Luden's Menthol Cough Drops," which have become very popular throughout the country, the annual sales amounting to five million five-cent packages. From twenty to twenty-five tons of sugar are required daily in the manufacture of his various confections; and the siding from the Philadelphia & Reading railroad to his plant affords the necessary facilities for his enormous shipments, which shows its importance as a factor in the dispatch of his large and growing business.

Mr. Luden is recognized as one of the largest and most successful manufactures of candy in the United States. During his career, from the beginning, he always treated his employes with great consideration and as a natural consequence they have come to be as much devoted to his prosperity as he is to their comfort and welfare. For a number of years past he has given them an annual "outing," at different places, along some railroad, paying all the expenses himself, which evidences his generous spirit. The high degree of mutual respect and confidence which has been developed between him and his employes is truly admirable and worthy of imitation by other large manufacturers.

Mr. Luden has been a devoted and generous member of the "Church of Our Father" (Universalist) from his early manhood, and his straight-forward spirit has contributed a great deal toward the welfare of the congregation. He served as a trustee of the church for a number of years. In 1890, Mr. Luden assisted in organizing and establishing the Schuylkill Valley Bank of Reading and since then has served as one of its directors ; and upon the decease of John Kissinger, the president, in 1906, he was selected to officiate in his stead, which important position he has filled until the present time. In 1904 he established the "Reading Natatorium," on North Fifth street, which was immediately appreciated, and since then it has been patronized extensively. The basket-ball exhibitions there during the winter and spring seasons have been highly appreciated by large and enthusiastic audiences. Mr. Luden is prominently identified with the National Confectioners Association, the Wyomissing Club, the Berkshire Club, and the Reading Board of Trade.

In 1889 Mr. Luden married Annie Ritter, a daughter of William Snyder Ritter and Julianna Shearer, his wife, and they have eight children (four sons and four daughters) : Harry Ritter, Albert Musser, Dorothy, Marjorie, Frederick Shearer, Milford Dirk, Jeanette and Wilma. His wife and children have also taken great interest in the welfare of the Universalist Church. Mrs. Luden is a member of Berks Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, being a lineal descendant of John Christopher Shearer, who emigrated from Germany in 1769 and then settled at Reading, in Berks county, where he came to enlist in the Revolution, and subsequently filled the office of justice of the peace for nearly twenty years, dying in 1830, aged seventy-seven. She is also a lineal descendant of Francis Ritter, the progenitor of the Ritter family in Exeter township, who died in 1825 and left four sons- Daniel, John, Jacob and Samuel- and four daughters, Daniel having been her grandfather.

Jacob Luden, the father of Mr. Luden, was born at Amsterdam, Holland, where he learned the trade of watch maker and jeweler and followed that business until about 1850, when he emigrated to Pennsylvania and settled at Reading. In 1855 he established a store on North Fifth street (now Nos. 35-37) and carried on business as a jeweler successfully until his decease in 1864, aged forty-two years. He was married to Sarah A. Musser, of Reamstown, Lancaster county, a descendant of one of the early families of that vicinity, and they had six children: Caroline (m. William L. C. Bailey) ; Edward Musser (m. Lizzie Etzel) ; William H. ; Sallie A. (m. James B. Marsh) ; Jacob C. (m. Annie Benson) ; and one that died in infancy.


LUDWIG, BROOKE

p. 1079

Surnames: LUDWIG, DAVIDHEISER, BECHTEL, LUTZ, De HART, SCHAEFFER, SPANG, MOSER, NEIN, STERN, DEETER, MILLER, LORAH, POTT, MARQUART, HOLLOWAY, ROTHERMEL, GREINER, ALDENDERFER, ALTHOUSE, BREIDENBACH, GRUBB, KIRLIN, BOWERS, GILBERT

Brooke Ludwig. The name of Ludwig is well known throughout the State of Pennsylvania to horsemen, and lovers of fine stock are quite familiar with the Valley View Stock Farm, in Amity township, the property of Mr. Brooke Ludwig.

In 1733 the ship "Pennsylvania Merchant" landed at Philadelphia, and among the passengers on that trip was Michael Ludwig, a native of Germany, who came to Berks county, Pennsylvania, and settled in Amity township, on the farm later the property of William Davidheiser. He married into the Bechtel family, and among his children were two sons, Michael (m. to a Lutz) and Philip.

Philip Ludwig was born in Amity township, March 10, 1759, and became a prominent farmer in his native locality. He was a man of strong religious convictions, and was one of those early interested in the building of the Amity church. He married Anna De Hart, born Aug. 16, 1769, died Dec. 25, 1825. He died Feb. 5, 1827. They had seven children: Abraham ; Thomas m. Mary A. Schaeffer ; Jacob m. Sarah Spang ; Benjamin ; Mary m. George Moser ; Ellen m. (first) a Nein and (second) Wesley Stern ; and Rachel m. Daniel Deeter.

Abraham Ludwig was born in Amity township March 7, 1788, and after attending the Molatton school engaged in farming. He m. Sarah Miller, born Jan. 8, 1786, died July 26, 1878. He died Jan. 18, 1863. They had seven children : Harriet m. William Lorah ; Augustus m. Carolina Pott, daughter of John ; Elizabeth m. Peter Marquart ; Mary Ann m. Jacob Holloway ; Elam Miller ; Sarah m. Jacob Schaeffer ; and Lewis m. Elizabeth Rothermel, daughter of Peter.

Elam Miller Ludwig, son of Abraham, was born March 7, 1828, and his boyhood and youth were passed in attending the township schools and assisting his father on the farm. When twenty-three years of age he began for himself on one of the Brooke farms in Union township, which he later bought, selling it three years later at a good profit. He then bought the Eagle farm in Amity township, and has since then been interested in farming and the breeding of fine horses. The Berks County Agricultural Society has served to exhibit some of his finest. He has owned some of the most noted trotting stock in the country. He introduced "Ironsides" to the track, this horse trotting in 2.36, a wonderful speed for the time, and when sold at auction in Amityville brought $2,650. Mr. Ludwig was exceedingly successful in buying colts and training them for the track. He married Hannah J. Greiner, daughter of Samuel Greiner, of Amity township. There children were: Calvin C. ; Morgan died in infancy ; Brooke ; Bard lives on the homestead ; Harriet m. Elmer Aldenderfer, of Pottstown ; Mahlon is training horses at the Phoenixville Stock farm, belonging to William D. Althouse, where he has been since 1891 ; Millie m. Charles Breidenbach of Pottsville ; Sarah C. m. Carl Grubb, of Baltimore, Md. ; Abraham died aged twenty-five years ; Lewis is a horse trainer at Baltimore, Maryland.

Brooke Ludwig was born near Birdsboro, Pa., July 19, 1855, and was educated in the common schools of Amity township. He was early given charge of the stock on the home farm, and has always been a lover of horses. In 1876 he began to train for other people, and from that time until 1891 he conducted a public training stable. He had his first stable at Pottstown, then went to Birdsboro, and from there to Three Mile House. In 1890 he purchased his present place in Amity, known as the Valley View Stock Farm. He has 150 acres, and he has made many improvements on the place. In 1891 he built the present barn, which has sixteen box stalls and all modern equipment. He has from forty to fifty head of horses all the time, and breeds trotting stock. He is the owner of "Nutbelview," 2.12 1/4 ; and of "Steel Penn" (by William Penn), 2.16 1/4. He is known all over this State, as well as in New Jersey and other neighboring States as a thorough horseman. His residence has not been neglected, and he has a charming home, with everything there that makes life worth living. Mr. Ludwig is very proud of a grandfathers clock he owns, which he obtained from his father, who acquired it from an aunt, Catherine Kirlin.

On Dec. 24, 1884, Mr. Ludwig married Ella M. Bowers, daughter of Amos K. and Matilda (Gilbert) Bowers, the former of whom was a native of Amity township, but lived in Lancaster a number of years, returning, however to Amity, where he died. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig, namely : Earl, Harold, Orrin and Roy.


LUDWIG, CHARLES R.

p. 1311

Surnames: Ludwig, Rapp, Berry, Ruth, Hertz

Charles R. Ludwig, who has been a popular school teacher in Spring township for a number of years, was born on the old Ludwig homestead in that township, near Montello, Nov. 13, 1879. He was brought up to farming and continued to follow that work, for his parents, until he was eighteen years old, since which time he has devoted himself to his profession. His early education was gained in the public schools of his native township and was supplemented by a course in the Keystone State Normal School at Kutztown. He was first licensed to teach in the spring of 1897, by County Superintendent E. M. Rapp, and in the fall of that year commenced to teach. He has only missed two terms since. His first charge was the Marshall school in his native district, and since 1904 he has been teaching the intermediate school at Sinking Spring. Mr. Ludwig has the respect of his pupils and the confidence of the community, which he has won by conscientious and successful work, and he is held in high esteem wherever known. He has been active in local affairs, particularly as a devoted worker in the ranks of the Democratic party, which he has supported ever since he became of age. He is at present township committeeman, having served as such since 1903, and was a delegate to the State convention held at Harrisburg in June, 1905, which nominated Hon. William H. Berry for State treasurer; he was the first Democrat to hold that office in about forty years. Mr. Ludwig is a member of various fraternal orders, belonging to Lexington Lodge, No. 155, K. of P., of Sinking Spring; Sinking Spring Lodge, No. 600, I. O. O. F.; and to Williamson Lodge, No. 307, F. & A. M., of Womelsdorf, Pennsylvania.

On April 13, 1904, Mr. Ludwig was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Ruth, daughter of Michael and Sarah (Hertz) Ruth, of Fritztown, this county, and to them have been born two children, Stanley and Charles M. Mr. Ludwig and his family belong to St. John's Reformed Church at Sinking Spring, where the Ludwigs have worshipped and been buried since its organization, in 1794.


LUDWIG, CLAYTON C.

p. 1123

Surnames: LUDWIG, LOOSE, RHODE, FAHRBACH

Clayton C. Ludwig, an energetic young business man of the city of Reading, Pa., formerly of the Franklin Specialty Company, was born at Tower City, Schuylkill county, in 1875, son of John B. and Katie (Loose) Ludwig, the former of whom died Jan. 30, 1907. The children in their family were as follows: Eliza, John, Peter, Sallie, Harry, Rose, Clayton C., Charles, Mary, Emma and Olive.

Clayton C. Ludwig attended the public schools in the coal regions, and for a time was employed in the coal mines. When thirteen years of age he came to Reading with his parents, and learned the cigar-making trade, at which he worked until 1901, in which year he engaged in business with Luther A. Rhode, at No. 343 North Eighth street, this being the origin of the Franklin Specialty Company. These partners remained together for a year, at the end of which time Mr. Ludwig bought Mr. Rhode's interest, taking Mr. H. E. Fahrbach into partnership. They located at Nos. 807-809 Cherry street, in April, 1903, and here they continued until Jan. 25, 1909, when they sold out to parties from Newark.

The Franklin Specialty Company as conducted by Messrs. Clayton & Fahrbach manufactured hammers, hardware and household specialties, and for workmanship, style, quality and durability had one of the finest lines of goods on the market. Among the company's products were found the "Cracker Jack" hammer and claw hammer, the "Korker" hammer, the "Winner 1/2 lb." hammer, the "Franklin" hammer and the "Hub" shoe hammer; the "Royal" iron stand and the "Acme" pot stand; the "Rambler" fishing-rod holder; the "Imperial" roller towel rack; the "Dandy" ice pick; the "Full Weight"1lb. hammer; the "Marvel" rotary nutmeg grater, and many other specialties so necessary to the house-wife. They made a specialty of job, nickel, brass and copper plating, oxidizing, bronzing and electroplating; and their work was of the highest grade. The company employed from fifteen to twenty skilled hands at all times.

Mr. Ludwig is a member of the Aerie No. 66, Fraternal order of Eagles, and the Red Men, and is president of the Electric Wheelmen. He makes his home with his mother at No. 304 North Ninth street.


LUDWIG FAMILY

p. 1310

Surnames: LUDWIG, SADLER, SUTER, KEIM, MOYER, RUTH, SCHAEFFER, DIEFENDERFER, TEXTER, LAMBERT, HAIN, HENDEL, MATZ, ULRICH, HERTZ, ZECHMAN, RAPP

The Ludwig family of Berks county was founded in America by Daniel and Michael Ludwig, brothers, who landed at Philadelphia Sept. 18, 1733, having come from Rotterdam on the ship "Pennsylvania Merchant," Capt. John Stedman. Their father's name was Michael, and besides him they left in Germany one sister and four brothers, Emmanuel, Philip, Jacob and Abraham. Both the brothers settled in Berks county, Daniel about a mile southwest of Sinking Spring and Michael in Amity township.

Jacob Ludwig, son of Daniel, one of the brothers who emigrated to America, was born Feb. 22, 1761, and died Jan. 26, 1813. He was the first of the family to own the old Ludwig homestead in what is now Spring township, having moved thither from Oley township, and the property was continuously in the possession of members of the family from the time he acquired it, in 1794, until its sale in 1902. In 1814 Jacob Ludwig built the barn which is still standing on the place, and the present dwelling was erected in 1902 by the estate of Charles S. Ludwig, under the supervision of the latter's son, Philip D. Ludwig. In 1902 the homestead place was sold by the estate of Charles S. Ludwig to the Montell Brick Company at $115 an acre. Some years before Charles S. Ludwig had himself disposed of twenty acres to the same concern at he unusual price of $350 an acre. When approached by representatives of the company and requested to name his figure for twenty acres of the property he set a good price, as he did not care to sell, and looking out of the window he remarked that he would take $350 an acre. The offer was accepted at once, the company having been prepared to pay $500 an acre if necessary. During Jacob Ludwig's time this land was included in Cumru township. Jacob Ludwig married Ellenora Sadler, who was born Feb. 26, 1761. Both were buried at Sinking Spring.

Philip Ludwig, sixth child of Jacob and Ellenora, was born July 9, 1793, on the homestead, where he spent his entire life engaged in farming. He married Katie Suter, who was born July 15, 1793, and to them were born the following children; Richard, born March 18, 1821, married Esther Keim; John, born Feb. 12, 1823, died young; Frank, born Jan. 24, 1826, married Rebecca Moyer; Catherine, born June 6, 1828, died in 1898; and Charles S. born in 1830, died in 1898.

Charles S. Ludwig was born Sept. 24, 1830, on the Ludwig homestead in Spring township, where he was reared, and which in time came into his possession. There he spent his entire life, engaged successfully in farming, is death occurring Dec. 11, 1898. He was a lifelong Democrat in political matters, and he and his family attended Sinking Spring Reformed Church, of which he was a member at the time of his death. In 1853 Mr. Ludwig was married to Ellen Ruth, born April 14, 1833, daughter of John and Elenora (Schaeffer) Ruth. Mrs. Ludwig died Nov. 18, 1886, the mother of eleven children, namely; Catherine R. born June 9, 1855, died in infancy; Frank, born Aug. 13, 1856, died in childhood; James M. born Nov. 25, 1858 is mentioned below; Mary R., born Feb. 16, 1860, married C. E. Diefenderfer, of No. 1321 Spruce street, Reading; Ellen R. was born April 25, 1861; Annie Laura was born July 23, 1863; John born Feb. 17, 1866, married Kate Texter and lives on the homestead farm; Sallie, born Aug. 30, 1869, married Harry Lambert; Emma, born June 22, 1871, married Howard Hain; Philip D., born Feb. 28, 1873, is mentioned below; Charles R., born Nov. 13, 1879, is mentioned below.

James M. Ludwig, a successful hatter of Reading was born Nov. 25, 1858, in Spring township, and until twenty-five years old lived on the farm. He received his education in the township schools, which he left at the age of nineteen years. In 1883 he engaged in the lime business in Spring township, burning 12, 000 bushels during that year, and he spent the following three years in the brick manufacturing business, in which he was also quite successful. He then learned the hatter's trade at Montello with John Hendel, with whom he remained until 1900. Mr. Ludwig is a substantial business man and a public-spirited citizen. In politics he is a stanch Democrat, never having missed voting at an election since he attained his majority.

On Sept. 15, 1882, Mr. Ludwig was married to Annie Matz, daughter of David and Mary (Ulrich) Matz, farming people of Spring township. To this union have come four children; Walter J., born Sept. 23, 1883, who is a clerk in the Farmers Bank, Reading; Paul, born May 19, 1886, who died Dec. 10, 1887; Mary Mabel, born July 31, 1889,; and Earl F., born March 14, 1892. Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig are members of St. John's Reformed Church at Sinking Spring. He purchased his present residence, at No 237 South Twelfth street, Reading in 1902.

Philip D. Ludwig, farmer of Spring township was born there Feb. 28, 1873, on the old Jacob Ludwig homestead near Montello. He received his education in the local district schools, which he attended during thirteen winter terms. He learned the trade of house painting from D. A. Zechman, of Sinking Spring, and followed that business for four years, but he was principally engaged in working for his father until the latter's death, in 1898. From the spring of 1898 until the spring of 1908 he farmed the old family homestead, doing his work in the most approved modern fashion, with up-to-date implements and intelligent methods, the effect of which was clearly shown in the fine condition of things about his place. He kept especially fine live stock, including five horses and four mules, but in the spring of 1908 sold his farm stock at public sale. He is now engaged in painting, at Sinking Spring. Mr. Ludwig is an energetic and enterprising young man, has traveled to some extent, keeps well read on current affairs, and is wide awake to all the responsibilities of practical good citizenship. Like most of his family he is a Democrat in political opinion and active in the ranks of the party. He served four successive years as committeeman of his district, being succeeded in that position by his brother Charles. Socially he belongs to Washington Camp No. 282, P. O. S. of A., of Sinking Spring, and to Sinking Spring Lodge, No. 660, I. O. O. F., and he is a zealous member of St. John's Reformed Church at Sinking Spring, which he has served as deacon.

Charles R. Ludwig, who has been a popular school teacher in Spring township for a number of years, was born on the old Ludwig homestead in that township, near Montello, Nov. 13, 1879. He was brought up to farming and continued to follow that work, for his parents, until he was eighteen years old, since which time he has devoted himself to his profession. His early education was gained in the public schools of his native township and was supplemented by a course in the Keystone State Normal School at Kutztown. He was first licensed to teach in the spring of 1897, by County Superintendent E. M. Rapp, and in the fall of that year commenced to teach. He has only missed two terms since. His first charge was the Marshall school in his native district, and since 1904, he has been teaching the intermediate school at Sinking Spring. Mr. Ludwig has the respect of his pupils and the confidence of the community, which he has won by conscientious and successful work, and he is held in high esteem, wherever known. He has been active in local affairs, particularly as a devoted worker in the ranks of the Democratic party, which he has supported ever since he became of age. He is at present township committeeman, having served as such since 1903, and was a delegate to the State convention held at Harrisburg in June 1905, which nominated Hon. William H. Berry for State treasurer; he was the first Democrat to hold that office in about forty years. Mr. Ludwig is a member of various fraternal orders, belonging to Lexington Lodge No. 155, K. of P., of Sinking Spring; Sinking Spring Lodge, No. 660, I. O. O. F.; and to Williamson Lodge, No. 307, F. & A. M., of Womelsdorf, Pennsylvania. On April 13, 1904, Mr. Ludwig was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Ruth, daughter of Michael and Sarah (Hertz) Ruth, of Fritztown, this country, and to them have been born two children, Stanley and Charles M. Mr. Ludwig and his family belong to St. John's Reformed Church at Sinking Spring, where the Ludwig's have worshipped and been buried since its organization, in 1794.

Last Modified Thursday, 16-Oct-2008 20:55:14 EDT

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