Biographies from Historical and Biographical Annals by Morton Montgomery

LICHTENWALLNER, JOHN

p. 1450

Surnames: LICHTENWALLNER, BEAR, STETLER, LEIBENSPERGER, SHAFFER, KLINE, FOGEL, STEININGER, SMITH, MILLER, ALBRIGHT, FOLK, SCHMOYER, GERNERT, STETTLER, SCHANTZ, HUNSICKER, MEITZLER

John Lichtenwallner. The Lichtenwallner family of Longswamp township traces its ancestry back to Johannes Lichtenwallner, who with his wife and one year old son, arrived at Philadelphia, Aug. 17, 1733, on the ship "Samuel," of London, from the Palatinate or Rhine country. On his arrival in Philadelphia, he purchased a team, loaded his wagon with what few household effects he had and, with his wife Barbara and son, followed the immigration as far as Hanover, in Montgomery county. There he remained a brief time, following his trade of blacksmith, at which he was a past master, as his passport from the mother country proves. He was in search of vacant land, and his evident desire was to settle where he could build for himself a home and till his own soil. He therefore took advantage of the new road opened in 1733 from Goshenhoppen, Montgomery county, across the Lehigh mountains, to where Trexlertown is now located. In 1734 he landed in "Magungy," which then comprised nearly all of the west end of Lehigh county, then a part of Bucks county. He followed an old Indian trail from Trexler's tavern, now Trexlertown, across Macungie into what is now North Whitehall township, and there settled on 300 acres of vacant land along the Jordan creek, for which tract he secured a warrant from the province of Pennsylvania in 1738. Just how long he remained on this property is not definitely known, but the land being rough and hilly and the soil shallow and gravelly, he went back to Upper Macungie, and located on a tract one mile west of the present site of Fogelsville. He must have settled there about 1742, built himself a log dwelling (on the spot where now stand the farm buildings of the old John Lichtenwallner farm, at present owned by Peter R. Bear, Esq., of Fogelsville), and there spent the remainder of his life. He and his wife had these children: the one year old son whom they brought from the old country; Margaretta, born Feb. 3, 1734; Maria Agatha, in 1736; Johann (2); Catherine, Oct. 2, 1742; Anna Christina, May 12, 1745; Johann Tobias, April 23, 1747; Catherina Margaretta, Oct. 30, 1749; and Abraham, July 12, 1753.

Johann Lichtenwallner (2), the common ancestor of the Pennsylvania family of that name, was born June 29, 1738, on the Lichtenwallner homestead. When twenty-five years of age, he married Catharina St?ler, daughter of Daniel St?ler, who was one of the pioneers of Weisenburg township. He resided during his whole life, in the stone house erected before his father's death in place of the original log house on the old homestead. He inherited 413 3/4 acres of land from his father, which lay in a body one mile west of Fogelsville. He evidently was a thrifty farmer, buying one tract after another until he owned, all told, 952 acres of good land in this section of the county. He died Oct. 30, 1794, aged fifty-six years, and was buried in Jordan Lutheran Church cemetery. His widow died eight years later, aged fifty-seven years, and was buried beside her husband. They had twelve children, of whom five sons and five daughters attained old age and left numerous descendants. The children were as follows: Johann (3); George (or "Yarrick"); Peter; Christopher (or "Stoffel"); Jacob; Catharina, m. to Matthias Leibensperger; Anna Maria, m. to George Shaffer; Barbara, m. to Philip Leibensperger; Margaret, m. to Henry Kline; Mary Magdalena, m. to Jacob Fogel; and two who died in infancy.

Johann Lichtenwallner (3) was born Dec. 1, 1766, or ten years before the Revolutionary war. He married Margaret Steininger, and they had ten children, namely: Jonathan, born Aug. 20, 1794, died unmarried, April 6, 1817; Lydia, born Oct. 16, 1796, died in infancy; Eliza, born Dec. 5, 1798, died young; Leah, who died in 1886, aged eighty-five years, m. John P. Smith; Rebecca, born Dec. 5, 1798, who died Dec. 16, 1889, m. John Miller; John was born June 1, 1803; Samuel was born Jan. 16, 1806; Judith, born Jan. 13, 1810, died June 20, 1887; Solomon died in 1824, aged seventeen years; and one child died in infancy.

Samuel Lichtenwallner, seventh child of Johann (3), and father of John, of Longswamp township, was born Jan. 16, 1806, on the old homestead near Fogelsville. His first wife was Maria Albright, and after her death in 1884, he married Eliza Folk, who died some years later. Mr. Lichtenwallner died on his farm near Mertztown, March 24, 1876, aged seventy years, and is buried in the Mertztown cemetery. He had ten children, as follows: Eliza, born Oct. 20, 1832, m. James Schmoyer; Lydia died young; John; Mary, born Sept. 5, 1839, m. Mathias Gernert; Aaron and Samuel died young; Sarah m. Israel Stettler; Hettie died young; Susan, born Oct. 28, 1850, m. (first) Adam Stettler, and (second) Jacob Schantz; and Lewis S., born Dec. 21, 1852, m. Lizzie Lichtenwallner.

John Lichtenwallner was born Aug. 5, 1836, in Longswamp township, where he was reared, and received his education in the local schools, later attending the advanced school at the Trappe, Montgomery county, under Henry Hunsicker. He was reared to the occupation of an agriculturist, and followed this as his life work until the spring of 1908, when seventy-three years of age he sold his stock, rented his farm and since that time has lived in well-earned retirement. He is unmarried and his sister, Eliza, widow of James Schmoyer, resides with him, being his housekeeper. Mrs. Schmoyer was left with five boys and four girls, as follows: Maleria; Lorah; Elias; Llewellyn; Uriah, who died in 1907, Erasmus; Harvey; Myra, who married Frank Meitzler; and Alice, who lives with her mother and uncle John, near Mertztown.

The family are active members of the Mertztown Lutheran Church. Mr. Lichtenwallner has been a life-long Republican, but has never aspired to office.


LICHTENWALNER, MILTON D. (DR.)

p. 764 Surnames: LICHTENWALNER, CLICK, SCHEAFFER, HAWK

Dr. Milton D. Lichtenwalner, a resident physician of Reading, Pa., was born in Lehigh county, in 1846, son of Elias and Fenna (Click) Lichtenwalner the former a prominent farmer of Lehigh county who owned a farm of 160 acres near Fogelsville. He died when seventy-nine years of age, and his wife in her eighty-first year, both in the faith of the Lutheran Church. Their only child was Milton D.

Dr. Lichtenwalner attended the common and private schools of the place of his nativity, and when thirteen years of age went to Quakertown and entered a school taught by Professor Horne, remaining there four years. He then spent a short time at a business school at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and returned home and spent two years at Philadelphia, 1856-6, at the Homeopathic Medical College. He read medicine two years with Doctors Slough and Hulfrich, at Fogelsville, Lehigh county. The Doctor practised in Macungie, Lehigh county, for three years, and then gave up his profession, and went to Chicago where he spent five years as a bookkeeper in the Grain Exchange. He was also engaged in the hat business at Allentown, and came to Reading in 1883, becoming bookkeeper for J. B. Scheaffer, a wholesale hat dealer. He remained there until Mr. Scheaffer closed out his business in 1903, since which time Dr. Lichtenwalner has lived a retired life. The Doctor is the owner of the old homestead farm in Lehigh county, and also owns another farm of 100 acres in the same county, but resides in Reading at No. 51 South Eleventh street.

Dr. Lichtenwalner was married, in Reading, to Miss Alice Hawk, daughter of Charles Hawk, of Reading, and one son was born to this union, Milton H., who is attending school. The Doctor is a member of Lehigh Lodge of Masons, No. 326, of Trexlertown.


LIEB, AARON L.

p. 908

Surnames: LIEB, LASH, HETRECH, DUNDORE, KANTNER, GICKER, ADAMS, HERBEIN, KLOPP, LOTZ, HAIN, KRAMER, YODER, KAUFFMAN, STRUNK, DICK

Aaron L. Lieb, a farmer of Bern township, Berks Co., Pa., was born in Penn township March 8, 1860, son of Joshua and Rebecca (Lash) Lieb, grandson of Nicholas Lieb and great-grandson of Michael Lieb.

(I) Michael Lieb was a large landowner in Bern township and a man highly respected for his sterling integrity and uprightness of purpose. He and his wife, Anna Margaretta, had these children: Susan (Hetrech), Mary, Nicholas, Zechman, Margaret, Elizabeth, Catherine and Sarah.

(II) Nicholas Lieb, born Nov. 16, 1793, died Dec. 9, 1837. He is buried at the Bern Church, of which he was a consistent member. Nicholas Lieb owned a farm of about 100 acres on the Bernville road, between the Bern Church and Mt. Pleasant, in Penn township. In addition to farming he followed the tailor's trade, traveling through Berks and the surrounding counties, as was the custom in those days. He was one of the most representative men of his times, and one of the most popular in his neighborhood. When his father died he was the executor of the estate; the will, which was made Feb. 26, 1818, was probated July 25, 1818. His wife was Catherine Dundore, a daughter of Jacob and Anna Dundore, born Sept. 6, 1796, died March 4, 1881, aged eighty-four years, five months, twenty-eight days. Their children were: Elizabeth married Joel Kantner, and died in Penn township; Annie married John Gicker and died in Heidelberg township; Joshua is mentioned below; Aaron married Louisa Adams and died in Bern township (they had children: John, of Spring township, Eliza, of No. 1818 Perkiomen avenue, Reading, the mother of Rev. M. L. Herbein, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work, and Amanda, who married Louis Klopp and is living at No. 324 North Front street, Reading, Pa.). Nicholas Lieb was a prominent and highly respected farmer and tailor and built up for himself a lasting reputation as a man possessing most excellent personal traits of character. Upright and honorable in his business transactions, and imbued with that generous public spirit that was always ready to assist in whatever was calculated to promote the welfare of his county and community, he made his worth felt and his loss was long mourned.

(III) Joshua Lieb, born May 3, 1826, died May 13, 1878, aged fifty-two years, ten days. He was born in Penn township on the old Lieb homestead, and for years remained with his father, engaged in farming. Marrying Miss Rebecca Lash (born Dec. 17, 1823, died Aug. 23, 1859, aged thirty-five years, eight months six days), daughter of George Lash, he settled on the farm and there remained until five years prior to his death, when he removed to State Hill and built a home, there living retired until his demise. In politics he was a Democrat, and in religious connection a member of the Bern Church. He was a man of substance, and one who won the confidence of the community.

Never aggressive, he nevertheless bore his part in the development and advancement of his community, and left the lasting heritage to his children of an unsullied name and spotless honor. The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Lieb: Ellen, who married Andrew Lotz, of Reading; Nathaniel W.; Rosa, who married John Hain, of West Reading; Emma, who married Edward Kramer, of Reading; Aaron L., of Bern township, married to Kate E. Yoder; Sallie, who married Frank E. Kauffman, of Reading.

(IV) Aaron L. Lieb attended the township public schools. He worked for his father until 1890, when he embarked in farming on his own account, in Lower Heidelberg township, but after a year he removed to Bern township, and resided on the Lash farm of 240 acres. After another year he went to Douglassville, and four years later settled on the Nicholas Dick farm, in Cumru township. His next location was at Poplar Neck, where he remained seven years, and then in 1902 he removed to Bern township, purchasing a farm at State Hill, of twenty acres, which later he sold.

Mr. Lieb married Kate E. Yoder, a daughter of William and Susan (Strunk) Yoder, and they had children as follows: William J., Howard N., and Harry P., deceased; A. Calvin, Annie F., John A., Katie R., Cora S. and Paul E., at home. Mrs. Lieb died Sept. 19, 1907, aged forty-one years, six months, nine days, and is buried at Hains Church cemetery, in Lower Heidelberg township.

Mr. Lieb is a member of the Bern Lutheran Church. In politics he is a Democrat, and fraternally he is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America at Leesport. He is genial and pleasant in manner, and a man who has a host of warm personal friends. The Lieb family is widely known throughout Berks county.


LIEB, NATHANIEL W.

p. 926

Surnames: LIEB, LASH, HETRECH, ZECHMAN, DUNDORE, KANTNER, GICKER, ADAMS, HERBEIN, KLOPP, LOTZ, HAIN, KRAMER, YODER, KAUFFMAN, BRUNNER, STAVER, OEHRING, SHARTLE, AMMARELL, DE TURK, WAGNER

Nathaniel W. Lieb, of West Reading, Berks Co., Pa., was born on the old Lieb homestead, in Penn township, Oct. 29, 1850, son of Joshua and Rebecca (Lash) Lieb, grandson of Nicholas Lieb, and great-grandson of Michael Lieb.

(I) Michael Lieb was a large landowner in Bern township, and was highly respected for his sterling integrity and uprightness of purpose. To him and his wife, Anna Margaretta, were born: Susan (Hetrech); Nicholas; Mary (Zechman); Margaret; Elizbeth; Catherine; Daniel; Sarah.

(II) Nicholas Lieb, born Nov. 16, 1793, died Dec. 9, 1837. He is buried at the Bern Church, of which he was a consistent member. Nicholas Lieb owned a farm of about 100 acres on the Bernville road, between the Bern Church and Mt. Pleasant, in Penn township. In addition to farming he followed the tailor's trade, traveling through Berks and the surrounding counties, as was the custom in those days. He was one of the most representative men of his times, and one of the most popular in his neighborhood. When his father died he was the executor of the estate; the will, which was made Feb. 26, 1818, was probated July 25, 1818. His wife was Catherine Dundore, a daughter of Jacob and Anna Dundore, born Sept. 6, 1796, died March 4, 1881, aged eighty-four years, five months, twenty-eight days. Their children were: Elizabeth married Joel Kantner, and died in Penn township; Annie married John Gicker and died in Heidelberg township; Joshua is mentioned below; Aaron married Louisa Adams and died in Bern township, the father of John (of Spring township), Eliza, (of No. 1813 Perkiomen avenue, Reading, the mother of Rev. M. L. Herbein, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work), Amanda, (m. Lewis Klopp, and is living at No. 324 North Front street, Reading,). Nicholas Lieb was a prominent and highly respected farmer and tailor and built up for himself a lasting reputation as a man possessing most excellent personal traits of character. Upright and honorable in his business transactions, and imbued with that generous public spirit that was always ready to assist in whatever was calculated to promote the welfare of his county and community, he made his worth felt and his loss was long mourned.

(III) Joshua Lieb was born in Penn township on the old Lieb homestead, May 3, 1826, and he died May 13, 1878, aged fifty-two years and ten days. For years he remained with his father engaged in farming, but after his marriage he settled on the farm, and there remained until five years prior to his death, when he removed to State Hill, and built a home, there living retired until his demise. He married Rebecca Lash, born Dec. 17, 1826, daughter of George Lash. She died Dec. 4, 1891, aged sixty-five years, five months and six days. In politics he was a Democrat, while religiously he was a member of the Bern church. Though never aggressive he always bore his part in the development and advancement of his community, and left a lasting heritage to his children of an unsullied name and spotless honor. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Lieb were: Ellen m. Andrew Lotz, of Reading; Nathaniel W.; Rosa m. John Hain, of West Reading; Emma m. Edward Kramer, of Reading; Aaron, of Bern township, m. Katie Yoder, and died in 1907, leaving Calvin, John, Annie, Katie, Cora and Paul; Sallie m. Frank E. Kauffman, of Reading.

(IV) Nathaniel W. Lieb attended school in Penn township, and later the Keystone State Normal School, at Kutztown, during 1868. He then taught two years in District township, being licensed by Prof. D. B. Brunner. After this he removed to Reading and worked for the Reading Eagle as collector remaining about two years. He then embarked in farming operations in Heidelberg township, and at the expiration of six years, he removed to Centre township, but after five years he made another change and took up his residence in Bern township on the William Staver farm, where he resided for some eighteen years. In 1902 he came to West Reading, and for some six years has resided at No. 334 Penn Street.

For eighteen months he was engaged with Brossman, in the manufacture of stockings, with plant at No. 111 Lenore street, Reading, but, selling his interest, he went in with the Felix Oehring Furniture Van Company, of Reading. Mr. Lieb was appointed executor of the Staver estate, and Nov. 3, 1907, he purchased the Staver farm, a property of 203 acres of excellent farming land, perhaps the best in Bern township. The water power facilities are unsurpassed, and the farm is very valuable, as is all of the property of the large Staver estate. In politics Mr. Lieb is a Democrat. He is a member of the Bern Lutheran Church.

On Oct. 17, 1872, Mr. Lieb married Miss Valeria Yoder, daughter of Frederick and Mary (Shartle) Yoder, and their children were: George R. is unmarried and at home; Mary m. Harry Ammarell, a teacher in Bern township; Arabella m. Allison Kramer, a teacher in Bern township; Sallie C., a graduate of the Central State Normal School, class of 1900, m. Elder P. De Turk, and they live in New York City; John E., at home, m. Sadie Wagner.

Mr. Lieb is a gentleman possessing those natural abilities and qualities which constitute the true man and valuable citizen. He is honored and respected by his associates in business, church and social life. As a teacher he bore his part in educational matters, and has always been interested in school matters, giving his children excellent advantages. Perhaps no one could have been selected who is better fitted for the office of executor of so large an estate as the one n the charge of Mr. Lieb, and this is demonstrated by the satisfaction he has given. His own interests in Berks county are very large; he is a man of wealth and influence, and he administers his properties wisely and honorably.


LIGHTFOOT, JASPER Y.

p. 916

Surnames: LIGHTFOOT, KERCHOFF, YARNELL, WRIGHT, WILLITS, MELOT, HIX, MENGEL, REDCAY

Jasper Y. Lightfoot, a well-known retired citizen of Blandon, Pa., who was for many years engaged in painting in Maiden-creek township, was born Jan. 26, 1849, near the old Friends' Meeting House, in that township, Berks county, son of David and Harriet (Kerchoff) Lightfoot.

Samuel Lightfoot, grandfather of Jasper Y., married Rachel Yarnell, and the had these children: David; Susan m. Joseph Wright; and Margaret m. Jesse Willits.

David Lightfoot, father of Jasper Y., married Harriet Kerchoff, daughter of Daniel and Sarah Kerchoff, and to this union there were born the following children; Eliza K. m. Daniel Melot; Margaret and Jane both died single; and Jasper Y.

Jasper Y. Lightfoot was reared in his native vicinity, where he attended the public schools, later going to Tremont Seminary at Norristown. He then clerked for some time in a store, but subsequently learned the trade of painter, which he followed until recent years, when he retired, and now only occasionally handles odd jobs. Mr. Lightfoot was married to Sarah C. Mengel, daughter of John and Mary (Hix) Mengel, and to this union there were born three children: Susan Eliza is deceased; Mary Jane m. Harris Redcay, and has had two sons, Harris (who died aged four days) and Linwood S.; Emma Lizzie is deceased. Mr. Lightfoot's wife and daughter are members of the Lutheran Church. In political matters he is a Republican, but he has never aspired to office outside of his township.

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM, BERKS ANCESTRY

p. 324

Surnames: LINCOLN, RICHARDS, MILLARD, ROBESON, BOONE, HANKS/HANCK, FOULKE

Berks County ancestry of Abraham Lincoln. Concerning the historical fact that the paternal ancestors of President Abraham Lincoln were residents in the Eighteenth Century of Berks county, whence they migrated to Virginia, Louis Richards, Esq., president of the County Historical Society, in a recent paper read before it, wrote in part as follows:
   Among the early immigrants to the Colony of Massachusetts - or Massachusetts Bay, as it was called in colonial times - were the Lincolns from old England. Picture of Early Lincoln HomeThe first of the name from whom the President's descent can be traced was Mordecai Lincoln, who is said to have been born at Hingham, near Boston, in 1657. The tradition that he was an "ironmonger" is strengthened by the fact that his son Mordecai followed that occupation. The latter, who was by the first wife, was born in 1686, and had two brothers, Abraham, born 1689, and Isaac, born 1691. The preference for Scriptural Christian names was followed in the family through many succeeding generations. President Lincoln, writing a brief autobiography in 1860, said that an effort to identify his Quaker ancestors in Pennsylvania with the New England family of the same name ended in nothing more definite than a similarity of Christian names in both families, such as Enoch, Levi, Mordecai and Solomon. Since that date the connection of the families has been reliably established. By a second marriage, Mordecai, Sr., had other children, some of whose descendants remain in Massachusetts at this day. The son Mordecai, Jr., removed with his brother Abraham to East Jersey about 1717, acquiring lands in Monmouth county. He resided there until probably 1720, at which date, and down to 1726, he is found assessed as a taxable in Nantmeal and Coventry townships, Chester Co., Pa. That he was possessed of considerable estate, and was an ironmaster, appears from record evidence of his association with Branson and Nutt, pioneers of the iron industry in that State, in the erection of a forge at Coventry, on French creek. His one-third interest in this establishment, and the lands appurtenant, he sold to Branson for L500, in December, 1725. In 1726 he is designated as a resident of Chester county in a conveyance to him in that year of certain lands in New Jersey. On May 10th, 1732, he obtained from Thomas Millard, of Coventry, a conveyance of one thousand acres of land in that part of Amity township, Philadelphia county, now included in Exeter township, Berks county; the tract being a portion of sixteen hundred acres formerly belonging to Andrew Robeson. The date of this deed is conjecturally that of his first residence in what is now Berks county, though it is possible that he may have come there earlier. In 1732-33 he is found in commission as one of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace.

His will dated Feb. 22, 1735 (O. S.), was proved June 7, 1736, indicating very nearly the date of his death. By it he divided his land in Amity township equally between his sons, Mordecai and Thomas, making provision contingently for an expected child, which, if a son, was to share the inheritance with his two brothers, each to take a third part. A certain tract of three hundred acres of land in the Jerseys he devised to his John, and other lands in the same Province to his daughters Ann and Sarah, leaving bequests to his remaining daughters, Hannah and Mary. His wife Mary received the residue of his personal estate, and the use of his plantation for life, being also constituted executrix. His friends Jonathan Robeson and George Boone were designated as her assistants in that office, according to a custom then prevalent.

The son John, who was by a former wife, was the lineal ancestor of President Lincoln. He subsequently sold his land in New Jersey, and emigrated to Rockingham county, Va., in 1765. This date is established from the tax lists of Berks county and the local records in Virginia in correspondence therewith. John had a son Abraham who went to Kentucky in 1782, and two years later was killed there by the Indians. Abraham left three sons, Mordecai, Josiah and Thomas. The president was the son of the last named, by his first wife, Nancy Hanks.

The posthumous son of Mordecai of Exeter, named Abraham, half-brother of John, was born Oct. 29, 1736. He became the most prominent member of the Berks county family in public life. From 1773 to 1775 he was a County Commissioner; served as sub-lieutenant of the county in 1777, was a member of the Pennsylvania General Assembly from 1772 to 1786; delegate to the Pennsylvania Convention of 1787 to ratify the Federal Constitution, and a member of the convention which devised the State Constitution of 1790. He died at his residence in Exeter township Jan. 31, 1806, in his seventieth year. He married in 1761 Anne Boone, daughter of James Boone, and his wife Mary Foulke. Her father's brother, Squire Boone, was the father of Daniel Boone, the pioneer of Kentucky, and a native of Berks county, to whom she was thus first cousin. Thomas Lincoln, brother of Abraham, was a thrifty landholder, and was sheriff of the county in 1758 and 1759. Mordecai Lincoln, the other brother, remained a resident of Berks county up to about 1789, removing to Dauphin county and subsequently to Fayette county, Pennsylvania.

President Lincoln referred to his Pennsylvania ancestors as Quakers. There is no evidence of the connection of the New England Lincolns with the Friends. Some of the members of the branch which came to Pennsylvania became affiliated with that denomination through intermarriage. Anne Boone, wife of Abraham Lincoln, the county commissioner, was brought under mild censure for marrying out of meeting. The Boones were of English descent, and staunch Quakers. George Boone, a native of Devonshire, who emigrated to the Province in 1717, belonged for a time to the Gwynedd Monthly Meeting, in Philadelphia county. Having acquired lands in what is now Exeter township, Berks county, in 1718, and settled there, he was appointed in 1723 by the Gwynedd Meeting to keep the accounts of births and marriages of Friends in his vicinity. He donated the ground for the meeting-house and burial- place of the Oley Monthly Meeting, since called the Exeter Monthly Meeting, constituted in 1737. The Boones were a prolific race, and, together with the Lincolns, left numerous descendants, who were among the most intelligent and respectable of the county stock. The two families were closely associated, and in the Exeter Meeting Ground the earlier generations of both lie buried.

Squire Boone, father of Daniel, removed in 1750 with his family to North Carolina, on the Yadkin river. Thence after he had grown to manhood, Daniel went to Kentucky, and entered upon his famous career as pioneer of that remote border land of civilization. From the connection of the Boones and Lincolns in Berks county, the inference is reasonably certain that the Southern migration of John, the President's ancestor, in 1765, was the direct result of that of the Boones, fifteen years previously.

A theory regarding the maternal ancestry of President Lincoln is that his mother, Nancy Hanks, was descended from a family of that name traceable in Berks county at the period when the earlier generations of the Lincolns were seated there. Nancy Hanks was a daughter of Joseph Hanks, of Nelson county, Ky., and one of her aunts on the maternal side married Abraham Lincoln, of Virginia, the grandfather of the President and son of John. All that is positively known upon this head is that a family by the name of Hanks appears in the records of the Gwynedd Monthly Meeting of an early date, and that the name of one Joseph Hanck is found upon the list of taxables of the town of Reading between 1758 and 1763. Whether the latter was identical with the Joseph Hanks of Kentucky, father of Nancy, is a matter of conjecture. In the absence of more definite facts, either for or against the supposition, no positive conclusion can be reached upon the subject.

[On page 299 may be seen a cut of the building where the children of Mordecai Lincoln, Sr., were born. It is situated about a mile below Lorane Station, several hundred feet north from the Philadelphia & Reading railroad, near a small stream. An extension was built to the west end.]


LINCOLN, RICHARD G.

p. 1147

Surnames: LINCOLN, GILBERT, KOUB, HAFER, FOCHT, RUTH, BIEHL, HOFFA, STONER, YOUNG

Richard G. Lincoln, a retired citizen of Reading, Pa., and the owner of the old Lincoln homestead in Exeter township, one of the most historic spots in Berks county, was born in Exeter township, Dec. 5, 1844, son of John D. and Sarah (Gilbert) Lincoln, and grandson of Thomas.

Thomas Lincoln was a lifelong farmer in Exeter township, and there died at the age of eighty-six years. He had three children, John D.; Anna, m. to John Koub; and one daughter who died young.

John D. Lincoln was born Dec. 1, 1814, in Exeter township, and was engaged in farming there all of his life, he owning a small tract of land. He died at the age of eighty years, in Reading, his wife being eighty-four years old at the time of her death. They were the parents of the following children: Amelia, who died single; Alfred, of Exeter township; Harrison, of No. 935 Franklin street, Reading; Elizabeth, m. to Samuel Hafer; John , who died in 1876; Richard G.; Martha, m. to David Focht; Anna; Sarah, m. to Lewis Ruth, of Reading; Mary, m. to Daniel Biehl, of Reading; and Oscar, who died at the age of two and a half years.

Richard G. Lincoln attended the public schools of Exeter township and the Buttertown school. His first business venture was the opening of the "Red Lion Hotel" at Baumstown, where he remained for a period of thirteen years, after which he went to Birdsboro, being there engaged in a company store for three years, as clerk. Mr. Lincoln's next employment was with the E. & G. Brooke Iron Company, in the same borough for a period of three years, and in 1886 he came to Reading, where he was employed with the Philadelphia & Reading Company, at the freight depot as clerk. After seven years at the latter place, Mr. Lincoln went to the lumber yard of Reuben Hoffa, of which he had charge.

On May 17, 1866, Mr. Lincoln married Hannah Y. Stoner, daughter of George and Catherine (Young) Stoner, and to this union there have been born children as follows: Roswell, a graduate of the Reading high school and Stoner's Business College, is now employed at the freight department of the Philadelphia & Reading Company, and resides at home; Virginia, single, resides at home. Mr. Lincoln is a Democrat, and has served as tax collector of the Ninth ward. In religion he is a member of St. Stephen's Reformed Church. He is an Odd Fellow, belonging to Lodge No. 314, of Birdsboro, and a member of Castle No. 302, Knights of the Golden Eagle, at Reading. Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln reside at No. 220 North Ninth street, and are much esteemed in their community.

Last Modified Thursday, 16-Oct-2008 20:55:12 EDT

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