Biographies from Historical and Biographical Annals by Morton Montgomery

KRICK, DANIEL H.

p. 1071

Surnames: KRICK, HAIN, GAUL, FRITZ

Daniel H. Krick, one of the most valued citizens of Spring township, a man of sterling honesty and broad-minded views, was born Aug. 19, 1860, in Lower Heidelberg township, Berks county, son of William B. and Anna (Hain) Krick.

William B. Krick engaged in farming throughout his active years, owning seventy-six acres in Lower Heidelberg township. He died in February, 1905, aged about seventy-six years. In politics he was a Democrat, and he filled the offices of township treasurer and auditor, serving in the latter office for twenty years. He married Anna Hain, daughter of Daniel and Mary (Hain) Hain, and they had three children: Daniel H.; John I., who owns his father's farm in Lower Heidelberg township; and Mary, who married Fred W. Gaul, of Wernersville.

Daniel H. Krick attended the school district schools during his boyhood and remained assisting his father on the home farm until he was twenty-three years of age, when he took charge of the place and operated it for himself seven years. In 1895 he purchased his present farm in Spring township of George and Isaac Krick. It then contained 149 acres, to which Mr. Krick has added several acres. The residence of stone, which still stands, was built in 1842, but it has been converted into a modern home by Mr. Krick. A substantial barn was erected in 1868. From the time he took possession until April 6, 1907, Mr. Krick continued to improve his property and his prosperity seemed assured. On the morning of the day he mentioned he arose and looked over his possessions with justifiable pride, because they had been acquired through his own patient and persistent industry. In the evening of the same day, through a fire that started mysteriously in the barn, he was bereft of a large part of all he owned. The barn itself was totally consumed together with nineteen valuable milch cows, seven hundred bushels of wheat, two hundred bushels of oats, ten tons of hay, five tons of straw and all the farm tools, machinery and farming implements. The fire occurred in the morning and its glare could be seen for miles around. His neighbors, however, could not reach him in time to render any adequate assistance. Their sympathy and admiration were given him, for he has borne the calamity with courage and resolution and already has made much progress toward future prosperity. The barn was rebuilt in the same summer, a substantial structure 90 by 45 feet, with a shed adjoining, 28 by 33 feet. For fourteen years Mr. Krick operated a dairy.

In 1873 he was married to Rebecca Fritz, daughter of Henry G. Fritz, and they have one son, William F., who is now a medical student at the University of Pennsylvania. His parents are giving him every possible educational advantage and he has the ambition to profit by the same. Mr. Krick and his family belong to the Reformed Church at Sinking Spring. In politics he is a Democrat.


KRICK FAMILY

p. 627

Surnames: KRICK, KRUCK, CREEK, SEITZINGER, RADER, YOUNG, SALLADAY, GETZ, HORNBERGER, AUMAN, BUCHART, MILLER, FISHER, NEFF, LUFT, RUPP, WORHEIM, SPOHN, RUTH, HAIN, SCHLEGEL, GEHRLING, BROSSMAN, GRIMES, BOHN, BRIEL, BECHTEL, SELTZER, ECKERT, HETTINGER, HIGH, REBER, VAN REED, SCHEETZ, MILLER, HARTMAN, YOST, GRAEFF, OBERLIN, SCHAEFFER, HOCH, HOTTENSTEIN, HERBEIN, BRIGHT, KERSHNER, BOHN, SLEGEL, KISSINGER, WOMERIN, OBERHOLTZER, HOHN, ROLLMAN, BICKEL, EVANS, CARROLL, SMITH, FUNK

The Krick family is one of the most numerous and prosperous in the Schuylkill section of Berks county. The name has been a familiar one in that locality for a hundred and fifty years, associated invariably with good citizenship, thrift and integrity, its members in every generation having been jealous of their good repute and mindful of the honorable traditions of their ancestors. All of the land purchased by Frantz Kr(as the name was originally spelled), the founder of the family in America, is still owned by his descendants. His posterity is especially well known in Cumru, Spring, Heidelberg, Windsor and Tulpehocken townships, Berks county. Some of his descendants have also located in Lancaster, Union and Mifflin counties.

Frantz Krs a native of Germany, born in the Rhein Pfalz in October, 1702. Having one night in a mischievous mood upset a sentinel (schilder) house he was found out, and in order to escape the punishment came to America, arriving at Philadelphia, Sept. 11, 1731, on the good ship "Pennsylvania Merchant." Settling in the Cacoosing valley, along the Cacoosing creek, in what is now Berks county, Pa., he became the owner of considerable land, originally owning a tract of 350 acres, in five parts, and later increasing his holdings to 750 acres. His property was in Cumru (now Spring) township, and comprised what is now the finest and most valuable agricultural land in the county. He devoted the rest of his life to the improvement of his holdings, and his descendants have followed in his footsteps to such an extent that his property is still in their possession, and in some cases has been farmed by the sixth generation. A part of the original land secured by him from the Penns in 1737 is now owned by Rev. Thomas H. Krick, a descendant of the sixth generation. When the city of Reading was laid out, in 1749, Francis Creek (as the name was Anglicized when he secured land from Penns) became the owner of lots Nos. 490 and 491. In 1759 he paid 19 taxes in Cumru township, an amount equal to $50.54, a Pennsylvania pound valued at $2.66. He was an industrious and well-to-do man, and the records of his extensive land transactions and dealings with the early settlers are proof that he was well educated, old papers that he signed being written in a good German hand. There is a family tradition that he was of royal blood, and it is certain that he was a man of intelligence and standing. His will, made April 26, 1782, was probated June 4, 1784, the year of his death, which occurred at a ripe old age. He was buried at Sinking Spring, in the Baptist burial-ground back of the old eight cornered school-house still standing. He reared a large family of sturdy sons and daughters, all of whom became useful men and women. Thirteen children are mentioned in his will as heirs, and the sons Francis and George were executors of the will. In February, 1782, Frantz Krld some of his land to his son Frantz (Francis), who gave his father bonds of 50 denomination each, and the will specified the dates upon which these bonds were to be redeemed. We have the following record of the family: (1) John, born in Germany, came to America with his parents. In 1759 he paid 3 tax in Cumru township. His name appears in the roster of Capt. Jacob Myers' Company, 6th Pennsylvania Battalion, 1782. This company had organized and was ready to respond to the call, but there was no actual service performed, John was married but had no children. He was a blacksmith by trade. He died in 1800. (2) Jacob also came to America with his parents. His name appears among the single men in the tax list of 1759. He was, however, married. as would appear from the baptismal records of Hain's Church. He had the following children: John Jacob, Maria and John George. He saw active service in the Revolutionary war in Capt. Reehm's Company of the 1st Regiment of Berks County Militia in an expedition to Newtown, Bucks county. (3) Francis is mentioned below. (4) George (known as "Blind George"), born May 8, 1738, died Sept. 9, 1825. He m. Margarita Seitzinger and was the father of a large family, Solomon , William, John, George, Isaac, Philip, Samuel, and eight daughters. He was a taxpayer in Heidelberg township in 1759. A few years later he moved back to Cumru, now Spring township, and purchased a farm between Sinking Spring and Reading, where he conducted a hotel for a number of years. He is buried at Sinking Spring. (5) Adam (there is no record of him). (6) Philip was captain of the 8th Company, Berks County Militia, Aug. 5, 1777, to Jan. 5, 1778. This company joined the army after the battle of Brandywine and took part in the battle of Germantown. No doubt he spent the winter at Valley Forge. We have no record of his family (7) Peter, the youngest son of Frantz Kras born June 27, 1756, and died July 31, 1829. He was a soldier in the Revolution in the 8th Company, 6th Battalion, and saw active service. He was known as "School Teacher" Peter and taught school near Sinking Spring, and was also teacher and "Forsinger" at the Muddy Creek Church. He m. Catharine Rader, and was the father of a large family, as follows: Rachael m. Henry Young; Elizabeth m. John Salladay; Katharine m. Philip Getz; John m. a Hornberger; Lelia m. Frederic Auman; Susanna m. Jacob Buchart; Mary m. Rudy Miller; Adam m. Catharine Fisher, and lived at Reading; Barbara m. Daniel Neff; Magdalena m. John Luft; Christianna m. a Rupp; Jonas moved to Hollidaysburg; William moved to Hamburg; Peter moved to Lancaster; John Jacob. (8) Margareth m. Michael Seitzinger. (9) Elizabeth m. Philip Worheim. (10) Maria m. John Philip Spohn. (11) Catharine, born Oct. 14, 1749, m. Jacob Ruth. (12) Eva. (13) Magdalena m. George Hain.

Frantz (or Francis) Krick, third son of the original settler, was born Nov. 6, 1736, in Cumru (now Spring) township, and died April 20, 1814, aged seventy-seven years, five months, fourteen days. He was a shoemaker by trade. In 1759 he paid 3 tax in Cumru. He was a private in Capt. Charles Gobin's Company, in 1780, during the Revolution, serving from Aug. l0th to Sept. 9th of that year, and saw actual service in the war. In 1757 he married Maria Spohn, who died in 1785, and his second marriage was to Catherine Schlegel, widow of Frantz Gehrling. She was born March 1, 1736, was first married in 1754, and died March 1, 1830, aged ninety-four years. No children were born to this second marriage. The names of his children appear in his will, and the dates of birth are given in the family Bible: Catharine, born Dec. 20, 1758, m. William Brown; Jacob, born Aug. 27, 1760, moved to near Richmond, Va.; Maria, born July 30, 1762, m. a Mr. Brown; John Adam was born March 4, 1765 (he had a daughter Catharine, who married Henry Snider and had a son, George); John was born April 11, 1767; Philip, born Oct. 4, 1769, moved to Wooster, Ohio; George, born Sept. 8, 1771, m. Catharine Wagner; Crete or Margaret (known by both names), born Aug. 29, 1773, m. William Fisher; Francis, born Feb. 8, 1776, m. Hannah Gehrling; Peter, born Feb. 28, 1779, m. Elizabeth Hill. The son Francis, the third of that name, was the sole executor of his father's large estate. The will was witnessed by John Spyker and Jacob Lambert, and was probated June 8, 1814. Francis (2) disposed of his farm to Francis (3) in the same way that Francis (1) had sold it to Francis (2), by bonds.

Francis Krick, son of Frantz and Maria (Spohn) Krick, was born Feb. 8, 1776, at the homestead, and died May 19, 1863, aged eighty--seven years, three months, eleven days. He was a farmer in very comfortable circumstances, owning about four hundred acres of valuable land. He was a soldier in the war of 1812-15. He married Hannah Gehrling, born June 4, 1774, died Feb. 3, 1842. They had a large family, two sons and seven daughters, and we have record of the following: Jacob is mentioned below; Katie, born May 7, 1801, died in infancy; Daniel is mentioned below; Elizabeth, born April 11, 1806, m. Daniel Brossman; Sarah, born June 1, 1808, m. Israel Grimes; Hannah, born May 9, 1810, m. Adam Bohn; Maria (Polly), born July 20, 1813, m. Abraham Briel; Esther, born Nov. 22, 1815.

Jacob Krick, son of Francis and Hannah (Gehrling) Krick, born in 1798, at the homestead, died Dec. 20, 1883. Like all his immediate ancestors he was a lifelong agriculturist, and prospered so well in his chosen calling that he was able to present each of his sons a farm when they left home. He was a zealous church worker, being an official member of St. John's Reformed Church of Sinking Spring, and was known to all as a worthy and substantial citizen. He is buried at that church. Jacob Krick was married April 12, 1829, to Catharine Bechtel, and they became the parents of four sons and four daughters, namely: William, born Oct. 10, 1829, lived and died in Lower Heidelberg township; Mary, born Oct. 26, 1831, m. Daniel Seltzer, of Lower Heidelberg township; Jacob B., born March 10, 1833, now a retired resident of Sinking Spring, m. Sarah A. Seltzer; Richard B., born Feb. 1, 1835, is a resident of Sinking Spring; Francis B., born June 2, 1836, died in Sinking Spring in 1902; Hannah, born April 4, 1834, and Sarah, July 5, 1839 both unmarried, have a comfortable home together at Sinking Spring; Susan, born Feb. 24, 1843, m. Jacob Eckert, of Wernersville.

Jacob B. Krick, son of Jacob, was born at the old homestead in Cumru (now Spring) township, March 10, 1833. He remained at home working for his father until he was past thirty-two years old, after which he continued his labors upon the same property, but upon his own account, living at the old Krick place until he decided to retire from the arduous work of the farm, in 1887. He then moved into Sinking Spring, where he has since resided, and in 1897 he purchased his present dwelling, formerly the Hettinger residence, on Main street. Here he has a most comfortable home, the house being one of the largest in the village and delightfully located. Though Mr. Krick has not engaged personally in the cultivation of the soil for many years he has retained possession of the old homestead, which now comprises eighty-seven acres, besides twenty-five acres of woodland.

During his active years Mr. Krick devoted himself thoroughly to business, attending to his work, and the management of his property with intelligence as well as industry, with excellent results. But he also found time for the development of his social and religious tendencies, and the associations growing out of such relationships have given him many pleasant interests for his leisure years. He holds membership in Council No. 77, Jr. O. U. A. M., and the K. G. E., No. 334, both of Sinking Spring, and is a past officer of both organizations. He is a Reformed member of St. John's Church at Sinking Spring, which he has served as deacon and elder for many years, and he has proved his worth to the community in various other capacities. While living on the farm he was for six years school director of Spring township. He is a Democrat in politics.

Mr. Krick married. Sept. 19, 1863, Sarah A. Seltzer, daughter of William and Catharine (Ruth) Seltzer, of Womelsdorf, Berks county, and they have had three children, two daughters and one son, the latter stillborn. Of the daughters, Mary Annie m. Isaac Hettinger, of Kansas City, Mo., proprietor of the Hettinger Bros. Manufacturing Company, of Kansas City, Mo., and Madison, Wis., manufacturers of dental surgical supplies, electric batteries, elastic goods, etc.; they have three children, Emily C., Evelyn G. and Francis K. Emily S. Krick, born Oct. 21, 1867, died Oct. 27, 1896. Mrs. Krick and her daughters united with St. John's Church as Reformed members.

Daniel Krick, son of Francis and Hannah (Gehrling) Krick, was born Oct. 28, 1804, in Spring township, and there passed his life engaged in farming. About a year before his death he moved with his son, Henry B., to a farm in Lower Heidelberg, near the Cacoosing where he died April 16, 1864. In 1833 he married Susan Bohn, daughter of George Bohn (son of Frederick Bohn), of Bern township, and she survived him many years, making her home with her son Adam, in Sinking Spring. She died Aug. 19, 1887. To Daniel and Susan (Bohn) Krick were born children as follows: James, born Jan. 12, 1834, died July 26, 1834; Lydia born May 31, 1835, m. William R. High; Adam B. is mentioned below; Henry B., born Jan. 16, 1839, died Aug. 3, 1906; Mary E., born Jan. 6, 1851, died May 19, 1902.

Adam B. Krick was born Oct. 27, 1836, in Spring township, and received a good education, attending school at Sinking Spring and Reading, and later studying at the Hudson River Institute, at Claverack, N.Y. During his early manhood he was engaged teaching for five terms, after which he devoted himself to farming, continuing in that line for nine years. Meantime he had suffered more or less from the results of an accident which occurred in 1852, and which culminated in 1873, when he found it necessary to undergo the amputation of a limb. This naturally caused a complete change in his plans for his work, and in the year last named he removed from his farm into the village of Sinking Spring, where within a short time he embarked in a mercantile business, dealing in flour, feed and grain, both wholesale and retail. He carried on that business throughout his active career, meeting with excellent success, for he displayed the same ability in the management of his business ventures as he did in his previous undertakings. He never lost his interest in educational affairs and the public school system, and served four successive terms as school director. He was an active member of the Sinking Spring Reformed Church, of which he served as treasurer, for a period of thirty years. He also served as township tax collector for a number of years.

In the year 1863 Mr. Krick married Lucy J. Reber, born April 13, 1844, daughter of Benneville B. Reber (son of Conrad) and Sarah V. R. (High), daughter William and Catharine (Van Reed) High. Six children blessed their union, viz.: William F., born Oct. 4, 1863, is mentioned below; Daniel B., born March 29, 1865, m. Mary Scheetz and resides at Sinking Spring; Sarah S., born Oct. 26, 1866, died in infancy; Rev. Thomas H., born Jan. 11, 1868, is mentioned below; Ida R., born Oct. 11, 1869, lives at home with her mother; M. Ellen, born Sept. 18, 1871, is the widow of Prof. Frank P. Miller, of Kutztown. Pa. Mrs. Krick still resides at the old home in Sinking Spring, where Mr. Krick died March 10, 1904, aged sixty-seven years, four months, fourteen days. He is buried at Sinking Spring. Mr. Krick was one of the most respected representatives of this large and influential family, and he ever maintained high standing both as a citizen and a business man. For a number of years he was recognized as the foremost citizen of Sinking Spring. He was regarded as a man of excellent judgment, and his advice was sought by a great many people. For a number of years he was the recognized leader of his political party in the township. Many a struggling person received help at his hands; more than one student was assisted in his struggles for advancement by him. He was frequently asked to write deeds and legal papers for others and was frequently made the custodian of other people's money--people who placed more confidence in him than in banks. He was often appointed guardian by court for minor children.

William F. Krick, one of the leading citizens of Sinking Spring of the present day, was born Oct. 4, 1863, on a part of the old Krick homestead, in Spring township. He obtained his early education in the public schools of that locality, later attending at Sinking Spring, and finally, in the spring of 1880, began a course at the Keystone State Normal School, where he studied for three terms. He received his first li-cense to teach, however , when but seventeen years old, from Prof. S. A. Baer, then county superintendent, and for two terms he taught the Gelsinger's school, in his native township. He had been reared to farming in his earlier years, and always had an inclination for agricultural work, which he began on his own account at the age of nineteen years, on a 130-acre tract belonging to his father. He remained on that place for twelve years, during which time he made distinct progress in the science of farming as well as in his finan-cial equipment. In 1894 he was able to purchase a farm in Lower Heidelberg township, consisting of 141 acres, and he has conducted this place ever since, improving it constantly according to the most approved mod-ern methods. He has not confined himself to farming by any means, but has branched out until his interests now include a large flour-mill and the controlling share in the Sinking Spring Electric Light Company, of which latter he is president. His farm is supplied with all the most improved implements and well stock-ed, and is considered one of the finest properties in the township. In 1894 Mr. Krick erected a Swiss barn 118 by 46 feet in dimensions, and his other out- buildings are on a similar scale and very substantial.

Mr. Krick resided on his farm until 1902, when he removed to the village of Sinking Spring, his commercial interests demanding his constant attention. He put up the building on Main street in which he established both his home and his business headquarters, the structure being a substantial brick three stories high, 48 by 64 feet, and he did business there for about three years. Meanwhile, however, he had erected the large Krick Roller Mills, along the south side of the Lebanon Valley railroad, a three -story structure of brick, 36 by 72 feet, with an annex 36 by 60 feet, erected in 1904. The mill is a model of its kind provided with all the latest machinery required for the roller process, and a high grade of flour is manufactured, Mr. Krick's special brands being the "World's Best" and "Ladies Choice." The product finds a ready market throughout the Eastern States, and Mr. Krick has an extensive local trade in this line, as well as a large wholesale and retail trade at Reading in the grain, feed and flour business. He has developed his business to its highest possibilities, showing what a man of enterprise and adequate ability may accomplish, and he gives employment to from ten to fifteen men, also using three teams in the transaction of his business.

Mr. Krick has displayed his enterprise as much in the development of an up-to-date public utility as in his strictly private affairs. The Sinking Spring Electric Company, in which he is the largest stockholder, is a private concern, but its workings so affect the public comfort and welfare that the community has a much deeper interest in its conduct than in the average commercial venture. This company not only supplies the light for Sinking Spring, but also for Springmont, Wyomissing, Shillington and Edison. The excellent service of the plant, and its efficient management from an industrial as well as a financial standpoint, are further evidences of Mr. Krick's powers as a man of executive force. His personal character is above reproach.

In 1882 Mr. Krick married Clara Y. Hartman, daughter of the late Amos and Rebecca (Yost) Hartman. Four children have been born to this union, as follows: Bessie H., who graduated from the Keystone State Normal School in 1902, is now engaged at teaching in Sinking Spring; Gertrude H., who also attended the Keystone State Normal, married Walter Graeff; Bertha H. is in high school; Charles H., born Oct. 10, 1892, is the fourth of this line born in October, his father, grandfather and great-grandfather having been born, like him, in that month, on the same farm in Spring township. The home of this family is a comfortable dwelling, supplied with every modern convenience for the well-being of its occupants. It is surrounded by a large and well-kept lawn, and is delightfully situated, being one of the pleasant homes in the village.

Mr. Krick is a prominent member of St. John's Reformed Church, of which he has served as deacon for two years, and which has so many dear associations for the members of this family. Many of the earlier generations sleep their last sleep in the graveyard of this old house of worship. Mr. Krick is a Democrat in his political faith, and in social connection he is an Odd Fellow, belonging to Sinking Spring Lodge, No. 660.

Rev. Thomas Henry Krick, a leading minister of the Reformed Church, now located at Coplay, Lehigh Co., Pa., was born Jan. 11, 1868, in Spring township, Berks county, on the old homestead near Sinking Spring, and was five years old when his parents moved to Sinking Spring, where he attended public school in the lower and middle stone school building. Later he attended the Charter Oak Academy, taught by Thomas J. Oberlin, in his district, and in the spring of 1885 entered the State Normal School at Kutztown, graduating from that institution in 1887. Through the efforts of his teacher. Dr. N. C. Schaeffer, and his thirst for higher education, he decided to take a college course. In 1887-88 he took the college preparatory course at the Normal school, and in the fall of 1888 matriculated at Franklin and Marshall College, at Lancaster. Pa., graduating therefrom in 1892. The same year he entered the Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church at Lancaster. In 1893 he taught mathematics at the Keystone State Normal School, and he also engaged in canvassing a few summers before his graduation from the theological seminary, in 1895. He had been licensed as a public school teacher when but sixteen years old, by Prof. D. S. Keck. During his college course he specialized in mathematics, in which he is a master. One of his classmates expressed the opinion that had he chosen to continue his studies in mathematics there is no doubt at all that he would have filled a chair in mathematics in one of the higher institutions of learning. He also took a very active interest in college athletics, playing on the foot-ball team as right tackle for five years. He is six feet and a half inch in height, and built proportionately, and he was generally known as the "impregnable stone wall." The college team saw the "golden age" of its athletic glories during his attendance, defeating nearly all the other college foot-ball teams that they played. Mr. Krick was manager of the team for one year.

On May 22, 1895, Thomas H. Krick was licensed by the Lebanon Classis of the Reformed Church, and on July 7, 1895, he was ordained by a committee of the East Pennsylvania Classis, at Jacobs Reformed Church, Weissport, Pa., which charge he served with high merit for the period of six years. During this time he raised a debt of $1,500 on the church property within one year, remodeled the basement of the church, increased the membership greatly, and the collections for benevolent purposes were increased threefold.

In August, 1901, he accepted a call from the Coplay charge, which is in the cement regions of the Lehigh valley. It consists of three churches. Trinity Reformed at Coplay, St. John's at Mickleys and St. John's at Fullerton. During the seven years of Mr. Krick's incumbency the membership at Coplay has been increased from 120 to 400, and in 1907 the congregation erected one of the finest parsonages belonging to the Reformed Church. At Mickley's a new Sunday school room was added through his efforts, and in 1902 he organized the Fullerton congregation, which now has a membership of 225.

Mr. Krick is a leading and active member of the Classis of the Reformed Church of the United States, highly esteemed by his brethren for his efficient work, high character and pleasant disposition. He is secretary of the Spiritual Conference of Ministers and Laymen of the Reformed Church. In 1908 he was elected president of the Lehigh Valley Ministerial Association. He was a delegate in 1899 to the General Synod of the Reformed Church of the United States, which met at Tiffin, Ohio, and in 1908 at York, Pa. He was delegate to the District Synod which met at Bethlehem, twice to the Synod when it met at Lancaster and delegate to its meetings at Sunbury, Perkasie, Lebanon and Reading. In 1898 he was president of the East Pennsylvania Classis. His executive ability and skill as an organizer are generally recognized, and he is as highly regarded in his own congregations as he is in other relations. He is a forceful and eloquent preacher, officiating in two languages, and ably proclaims the Word to whose spread he has devoted his life.

For a number of years Mr. Krick took a deep and active interest in the history and genealogy of his own and other families, and in 1907 founded the Krick Family Reunion, which in 1908 held its second reunion on the ancestral acres and was largely attended. He traces his genealogy through the following families: Hoch, Van Reed, Hottenstein, Yost, Herbein, Reber, Bright, Kershner, Bohn, Slegel, Kissinger, Womerin, Spohn and Krick. He has given considerable time to research on most of these families.

On Nov. 21, 1895, Rev. Mr. Krick was united in marriage with Jennie P. Hain, daughter of Peter L. and Sue L. (Oberholtzer) Hain, of Heidelberg township, and a descendant of George Hain (Hohn), who granted the land upon which is erected the Hains Reformed Church. To Mr. and Mrs. Krick have been born two daughters: Marie H., born July 21, 1898: and Ruth H., born May 12, 1901. Mrs. Krick is an ideal minister's wife and is prominently identified with every phase of church work.

Richard B. Krick, a retired citizen of Sinking Spring, was born Feb. 1, 1835, on the original homestead of Frantz Crick, in what is now Spring township, son of Jacob Krick (son of Francis (3) ). He began his education in the pay schools which were then in vogue in his district, attending the old pay school held in the eight-cornered school house which is so fully written up in the archives of the Berks County Historical Society, he having supplied the major part of the information for the article mentioned. Later, when the free schools were established, he attended them for two or three months during the winter for a few years. Much of his education, however, has been selfacquired, and he has read and observed with intelligence all his long life.

Mr. Krick was reared on the homestead, where he worked until he was thirty years old, and in the spring of 1866 he began farming on his own account in Spring township, where he continued agricultural pursuits successfully for twenty years. He built the present house on this farm which he still owns, in about 1874, and had previously put up the barn, in 1868. This place was originally a Rollman tract. It comprises ninety-seven acres, and is one of the best farms in the valley. In 1887 he retired to the small tract at Sinking Spring where he has since made his home.

Mr. Krick is a veteran of the Civil war, having enlisted at Reading Oct. 27, 1862, for a period of nine months. He actually served, however, but fifteen days less than a year, being mustered out Aug. 12, 1863, as sergeant of Company E, 167th Pa. V. I. He saw active service at the battle of the Deserted Farm (where his colonel was mortally wounded) and was on picket duty when they fought at Carrsville, Virginia.

Mr. Krick is a Democrat in political opinion and has been somewhat active in local affairs, having served nine consecutive years as school director of Spring township and meantime acted as president of the board; he was also auditor of the district for a num-ber of years. He is much respected in his district, and has always been known as a good citizen. In spite of his advanced age his mind is clear and he is well preserved in every way.

On Oct. 27, 1859, Mr. Krick married Emma Bickel, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Miller) Bickel, of Reading. She died Dec. 17, 1908, aged seventy years, eight days, and rests in the family plot at Sinking Spring. To Mr. and Mrs. Krick were born three children: Albert died when one year old. Lizzie S., born in 1861, married Miller Evans, of Reading, and died in 1902, the mother of six children, Annie (deceased), Emma, John, Richard, Fred, and Frank (the last named deceased). Jacob B. is mentioned below.

Mr. Krick and his family are members of St. John's Reformed Church at Sinking Spring, of which he served as trustee for three years, deacon for some years, and elder two years. He has always been active in the work and enterprises of the church, and is a director of the Sinking Spring Union Cemetery Company. He is a member of Castle No. 334, K. G. E., of Sinking Spring, and has been treasurer since its organization in 1889. He is also active in the Krick Family Reunion Association, and in 1908 made the welcome address at the annual gathering. He has a resourceful mind, and was of great assistance to the historian of the Reunion Association, and also of this volume.

Jacob B. Krick, son of Richard B., was born in Spring township, June 23, 1867, and was educated in the local public schools and Charter Oak Academy, as well as the select school known as Carroll Institute on North Fourth street, Reading, then under the care of Prof. Patrick Carroll. Later he entered Lafayette College, but he left that institution to accept a responsible position with the Enterprise Manufacturing Company, of Philadelphia, in whose service he has been since 1889. The company employs 750 men. Mr. Krick is a member of the Order of Independent Americans. He is unmarried.

Henry B. Krick was born in Spring township, Berks county, Jan. 16, 1839, son of Daniel and Susan (Bohn) Krick, and died Aug. 3, 1906, and is buried at Sinking Spring. He was reared to farm life, and soon after his marriage began farming near Sinking Spring, where he lived many years. He later moved to a tract along the pike a half mile above Sinking Spring, where he lived retired until his death. His farm consisted of about 150 acres, and belonged to his father. The Henry B. Krick residence is now the property of Robert Lance.

Mr. Krick was a Democrat in politics, and held the office of school director. During the Civil war he served as a soldier and contracted rheumatism, from which he suffered all the rest of his life, and which in fact caused his retirement from active work quite early in life. He was prominent and influential in his community, and was highly esteemed by all.

Mr. Krick married Catharine Smith, daughter of Daniel and Annie (Funk) Smith, of near Denver, Lancaster county. She died Dec. 5, 1901, in the sixty-first year of her age. Five children blessed this union: Daniel, who died in infancy; Anna S., residing at West Reading; Stephen, who died in infancy; Daisy, who resides at No. 521 Weiser street, Reading; and Laura, who died in infancy.


KRICK, HENRY B.

p. 630

Surnames: KRICK, BOHN, LANCE, SMITH, FUNK

Henry B. Krick was born in Spring township, Berks county, Jan. 16, 1839, son of Daniel and Susan (Bohn) Krick, and died Aug. 3, 1906, and is buried at Sinking Spring. He was reared to farm life, and soon after his marriage began farming near Sinking Spring, where he lived many years. He later moved to a tract along the pike a half mile above Sinking Spring, where he lived retired until his death. His farm consisted of about 150 acres, and belonged to his father. The Henry B. Krick residence is now the property of Robert Lance.

Mr. Krick was a Democrat in politics, and held the office of school director. During the Civil war he served as a soldier and contracted rheumatism, from which he suffered all the rest of his life, and which in fact caused his retirement from active work quite early in life. He was prominent and influential in his community, and was highly esteemed by all.

Mr. Krick married Catharine Smith, daughter of Daniel and Annie (Funk) Smith, of near Denver, Lancaster county. She died Dec. 5, 1901, in the sixty-first year of her age. Five children blessed this union: Daniel, who died in infancy; Anna S., residing at West Reading; Stephen, who died in infancy; Daisy, who resides at No. 521 Weiser street, Reading; and Laura, who died in infancy.


KRICK, JAMES M.

p. 1143

Surnames: KRICK, MOYER, LEVAN, WELDY, FINEFROCK, SNYDER

James M. Krick, a well known resident of the Twelfth ward of Reading, who is one of the old and trusted engineers on the Philadelphia & Reading railroad, was born Jan. 24, 1850, in Reading, Pa., son of Abraham and Mary (Moyer) Krick, and grandson of Adam Krick.

Adam Krick, who was a native of Berks county, was a prominent man of his day, and kept a hotel near the city of Reading. He and his wife had these children: William, John, Peter, Abraham, Maria, Ellen and Hannah.

Abraham Krick, son of Adam, was born in Berks county, and for many years followed the milling business near Bernville, his property being known as Krick's Mill. Mr. Krick died in Reading at the age of sixty-three years, and his wife, whose maiden name was Mary Moyer, died in her sixty-first year. Their children were: Henry, Franklin, Levan, James M., Abraham, Jr., Adam, Mary (m. Harry Levan) and Ellen.

James M. Krick attended the schools of Jefferson township, Berks county, and came to Reading in 1865, spending the first eighteen months of his stay here in a mill. For two years he was a bar clerk, and on May 3, 1871, he entered the employ of the Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company, as brakeman, a capacity in which he served for nine years. He was then promoted to fireman, and after six years to the position of engineer, in which he has continued to the present time, having the full confidence of his employers.

In 1874 Mr. Krick was married to Hannah Weldy, daughter of John C. and Maria (Finefrock) Weldy, and to them were born: Charles, a railway postal clerk on the Pennsylvania Railroad; Emma, m. to Winfield Edmund Snyder, a clerk in the Keystone National Bank, Reading; and John, a railway mail clerk, who resides at home.

In political matters Mr. Krick is independent. He is a member and liberal supporter of the Lutheran Church and is also connected with the Philadelphia & Reading Relief Association. Mr. Krick's residence is at No. 615 North Ninth street, Reading.


KRICK, JOEL H.

p. 529

Surnames: KRICK, HINNERSHITZ, REBER, LEAS, SHRUMP, WHITMOYER, KISSINGER, WEIDNER, ENGLEHART, MERRITT, GETZ

Joel H. Krick, the well-known proprietor of the "West End Hotel," one of the popular hostelries of Reading, located at the corner of Schuylkill avenue and Buttonwood street, was born in Reading, Dec. 4, 1861, son of Levi J. R. and Mary (Hinnershitz) Krick, and grandson of Peter Krick.

Peter Krick was a native of Heidelberg township, Berks county, and was a well-known boat-builder in the days when the Schuylkill canal was one of the principal means of transportation in this section of Pennsylvania. He followed his vocation for many years at the foot of Buttonwood street, Reading, where his boat-building yard was located, and became very successful. Mr. Krick married Susan Reber, of Berks county, and she bore her husband these children: William R., Joel R., Adam R., Levi J. R., Peter R., Emma (m. William Leas) and Catherine. Mr. Krick was very liberal in his religious views, but was kind and charitable, and few indeed were the subscriptions for a worthy cause that did not bear his name. In politics he was a stanch Democrat, but he never cared for, nor sought, public office.

Levi J. R. Krick learned boat-building under the skilled tuition of his father, following that occupation for many years. In 1887 he turned his attention to the hotel business, following that occupation until his death in 1905, at the age of sixty-six years. He was known for his many sterling traits of character, and was ever liberal to those in need. The children born to Levi J. R. Krick and his wife were: Joel H., Peter M., Annie (m. Harry Shrump, deceased), Emma (m. Daniel Whitmoyer, deceased), Mary (deceased, m. Harvey Kissinger) and Rebecca (deceased). In religious belief the family were connected with the Reformed Church. He was a loyal Democrat, and was elected to fill positions of honor and trust, serving in both the common and select councils, and at one time being market commissioner. He was a letter carrier during President Cleveland's first term. He was connected with several fraternal organizations, and was a member of the Junior Fire Company. Mrs. Krick died in 1891, aged about forty-eight years.

Joel H. Krick received his education in the public schools of Reading, and when a boy worked in the boat yard which had been founded by his grandfather. Learning the trade of boat builder with his father, he followed this occupation for some time, and in 1885 was appointed under Mayor Getz, a member of the Reading Police Force, continuing as a member until 1887. During Mayor Merritt's administration Mr. Krick was again appointed to that position, 1890-1893, and upon the expiration of this term he entered the employ of his father in the hotel, in which he has since continued. In 1897 he was elected a member of the board of prison inspectors for Berks county, serving nine years, and for seven years was president thereof. He was elected by the fireman of the 2nd district as assistant chief of the Reading Fire Department, serving three years. Mr. Krick has always been a stanch Democrat, and has always been a valuable party man in the sixth ward. He has been a delegate to various county and State conventions. On Nov. 3, 1908, by a large majority Mr. Krick was elected a director of the poor of Berks county, for a term of three years. He is very popular fraternally, holding membership in the following orders: I. O. O. F.; Fraternal Order of Eagles; P. O. S. of A.; the Independent Gun Club; the Eagles Mountain Home Association; the Harmonie Association; and the Schuylkill Fire Company. He was a member of the Junior Fire Company for twenty years, but resigned to join the Schuylkill Fire Company in 1901. He is also connected with the Northwestern Beneficial Association. In religion Mr. Krick is connected with the Reformed Church.

In 1886 Mr. Krick married Rosa Weidner, and to this union were born five children, four of whom are living, as follows James, Joel, Jr., Maud (who married Edward Englehart, is living at No. 252 W. Buttonwood Av., and is the mother of Joel Henry) and Esther.


KRICK, JOHN I.

p. 1488

Surnames: KRICK, HAIN, KERLIN, BECHTEL, SELTZER, BICKEL, FINCHER, ECKERT, FRITZ, GAUL, NUNNEMACHER, YOCUM

John I. Krick, of Lower Heidelberg township, Berks county, pleasantly located on an excellent farm, was born on his present property, June 4, 1862, son of William B. and Anna (Hain) Krick.

Jacob Krick, the grandfather of John I., was a son of Francis Krick, who married a Miss Kerlin, and was a farmer of Spring township. He married Catherine Bechtel, daughter of Richard Bechtel, of Cumru township, and they had eight children: William B.; Mary m. Daniel Seltzer; Jacob m. Sarah Seltzer; Richard m. Emma Bickel; Francis m. Elizabeth Fincher; Sarah; Hannah; and Susan m. Jacob Eckert.

William B. Krick, father of John I., was a farmer, brought up in Spring township, who moved to Lower Heidelberg township in 1860, locating on the farm now owned by his son, John I., where he carried on agricultural pursuits until his retirement in 1901. He died in 1906, at the age of seventy-six years. William B. Krick married Anna Hain, daughter of Daniel Hain, of Lower Heidelberg township, and to them were born three children: Daniel, m. to Rebecca Fritz; John I.; and Mary, m. to Frederick Gaul.

John I. Krick was educated in the township school, and was reared to the life of a farmer until he was twenty years of age, at which time he entered the employ of the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, and later the Lebanon Valley Railroad, where he continued for the next ten years. Returning to the home place, he assisted his father for three years, and then leased the farm. He carried it on under the lease until 1901, at which time he purchased it. He has since conducted it very successfully, and makes a specialty of dairy farming, supplying milk daily to numerous customers at Reading.

Mr. Krick was married to Mary E. Nunnemacher, daughter of Levi B. and Elizabeth (Fritz) Nunnemacher, and sister of John Nunnemacher, who married Sallie Yocum. Mr. and Mrs. Krick have had three sons: Harry, Clayton and Willie.


KRICK, RICHARD B.

p. 630

Surnames: KRICK, CRICK, BICKEL, MILLER, EVANS, CARROLL

Richard B. Krick, a retired citizen of Sinking Spring, was born Feb. 1, 1835, on the original homestead of Frantz Crick, in what is now Spring township, son of Jacob Krick (son of Francis (3)). He began his education in the pay schools which were then in vogue in his district, attending the old pay school held in the eight-cornered school-house which is so fully written up in the archives of the Berks County Historical Society, he having supplied the major part of the information for the article mentioned. Later, when the free schools were established, he attended them for two or three months during winter for a few years. Much of his education, however, has been self-acquired, and he has read and observed with intelligence all his long life.

Mr. Krick was reared on the homestead, where he worked until he was thirty years old, and in the spring of 1866 he began farming on his own account in Spring township, where he continued agricultural pursuits successfully for twenty years. He built the present house on this farm which he still owns, in about 1874, and had previously put up the barn, in 1868. This place was originally a Rollman tract. It comprises ninety-seven acres, and one of the best farms in the valley. In 1887 he retired to the small tract at Sinking Spring where he has since made his home.

Mr. Krick is a veteran of the Civil war, having enlisted at Reading Oct. 27, 1862, for a period of nine months. He actually served, however, but fifteen days less than a year, being mustered out Aug. 12, 1863, as sergeant of Company E, 167th Pa. V. I. He saw active service at the battle of the Deserted Farm (where his colonel was mortally wounded) and was on picket duty when they fought at Carrsville, Virginia.

Mr. Krick is a Democrat in political opinion and served nine consecutive years as school director of Spring township and meantime acted as president of the board; he was also auditor of the district for a number of years. He is much respected in his district, and has always been known as a good citizen. In spite of his advanced age his mind is clear and he is well preserved in every way.

On Oct. 27, 1859, Mr. Krick married Emma Bickel, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Miller) Bickel, of Reading. She died Dec. 17, 1908, aged seventy years, eight days, and rests in the family plot at Sinking Spring. To Mr. and Mrs. Krick were born three children: Albert died when one year old. Lizzie S., born in 1861, married Miller Evans, of Reading, and died in 1902, the mother of six children, Annie (deceased), Emma, John, Richard, Fred, and Frank (the last named deceased. Jacob B. is mentioned below.

Mr. Krick and his family are members of St. John's Reformed Church at Sinking Spring, of which he served as trustee for three years, deacon for some years, and elder two years. He has always been active in the work and enterprises of the church, and is a director of the Sinking Spring Union Cemetery Company. He is a member of Castle No. 334, K. G. E., of Sinking Spring, and has been treasurer since its organization in 1889. He is also active in the Krick Family Reunion Association, and in 1908 made the welcome address at the annual gathering. He has a resourceful mind, and was of great assistance to the historian of the Reunion Association, and also of this volume.

Jacob B. Krick, son of Richard B., was born in Spring township, June 23, 1867, and was educated in the local public schools and Charter Oak Academy, as well as the select school known as Carroll Institute on North Fourth street, Reading, then under the care of Prof. Patrick Carroll. Later he entered Lafayette College, but he left that institution to accept a responsible position with the Enterprise Manufacturing Company, of Philadelphia, in whose service he has been since 1889. The company employs 750 men. Mr. Krick is a member of the Order of Independent Americans. He is unmarried.


KRICK, WELLINGTON B.

p. 792

Surnames: KRICK, BARNES, BELLMAN, GRING, LENGEL, BAER, HAIN, CLYMAN, MOYER, HASSLER, BISSINGER, BROWNMILLER, YODER, SHEPP

Wellington B. Krick, wholesale liquor dealer of Reading, and until recently the proprietor of the Bissinger Cafe, the best appointed and most popular cafe in Reading, was born Sept. 10, 1858, in Sinking Spring, Berks county, son of John and Elizabeth (Barnes) Krick. Frantz Krick, the great-grandfather of Wellington B. Krick, on coming to America settled in Berks county, Pa., and his land has now been in the family for two hundred years. Peter Krick, son of Frantz, married and lived in Berks county. His son, John, father of Wellington B., was born in Spring township, and died in Reading, in 1901, aged sixty-seven years. He was a miller by trade. He married Elizabeth Barnes, born at Adamstown, who died aged seventy years, eighteen days before her husband. A sister of hers still survives, aged eighty-eight years. The children of John and Elizabeth Krick were nine in number, the survivors being as follows: Mary m. Joseph Bellman, of Reading; Rosie m. Charles Gring, of Camden, N. J., owner of tugboats and barges on the Delaware river; Ellen m. Edwin Lengel, a machinist of Reading; Hannah m. Daniel Baer, a farmer of Berks county; Wellington B. is mentioned below. The deceased children were Francis, who died in infancy; George, who died aged eight years; Henry, who was accidentally killed while crossing railroad tracks, just seven weeks after his marriage, aged thirty years; and Sallie, who died aged ten years.

Wellington B. Krick attended the public schools until he was nine years old, at that age going on a farm, where he continued to work until he was twelve. His father then moved to Birdsboro and the lad found work in the Brooke nail factory, where he remained two years. He was then employed by George W. Hain, in a grocery business, for a year, after which he spent a year on a farm in Muhlenberg township. His next employer was William Clyman, with whom he remained for two and a half years, and then he went back to farming, working seven years for Thomas Moyer.

Mr. Krick came to Reading Jan. 13, 1879, and for thirteen months and two weeks worked with Augustus Hassler, as a waiter in a restaurant at the Washington Library, Penn street, entering the employ of Capt. Philip Bissinger Feb. 22, 1880. He remained with this employer for sixteen years, during the last four years of which period he was the superintendent of the restaurant. On Jan. 1, 1895, he became proprietor of this popular cafe, having the largest business of the kind in the city. His patrons averaged eight hundred daily, and there are accommodations for 1,200. His long experience made him a fine caterer, and his services were in request on all festive occasions in the city during his connection with the restaurant business. In 1908 he sold the cafe to Aaron Brownmiller for $107,000 and he is now devoting his attention to the wholesale liquor trade, having bought out William C. Yoder. His place of business is at No. 635 Penn street, Reading.

Mr. Krick married April 6, 1886, Emma S. Shepp, the estimable daughter of John Shepp, a farmer living north of Reading. They have had four children, namely: Elnora died aged nine years; Philip died aged five years; George died aged thirteen months; Estella, a graduate of the Reading high school, class of 1908, who spent one year at the National Park Seminary, Forest Glen, Washington, D. C., is now her father's valued assistant, looking after the books, and in other ways proving herself a capable business woman. The family home is at No. 109 North Fourth street.

Mr. Krick is a member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has reached the thirty-second degree; he belongs to Teutonia Blue Lodge, No. 367; Excelsior Chapter, No. 42; Harrisburg Commandery, K. T.; the Consistory; the Scottish Rite; and Rajah Temple, Mystic Shrine. For twenty-eight years he has been a member of Camp No. 61, P. O. S. of A., which is the oldest P. O. S. of A. Camp in the State and the only one which did not disband during the war of the Rebellion. He also belongs to the I. O. O. F., besides which he is a valued member of the Reading Press Club and the Reading Board of Trade. He is interested in the Southwestern Electric Railway Company, of which he is a director, and he is also a director of the Murphy-Parker Company, book-binders of Philadelphia.

In politics Mr. Krick is a Republican, but he has always declined office of a political nature. He is a member of the Second Reformed Church of Alsace, and is a very liberal supporter of all its various benevolent enterprises.

No resident and few visitors to Reading were ignorant of the really fine accommodations offered at the Bissinger Cafe during Mr. Krick's proprietorship, and in this connection he was best known. He gave regular employment to thirty people, his patronage came from the most fastidious citizens of both sexes, and the appointments and comforts of the establishment compare favorably with those of much larger cities. Mr. Krick was a careful, solicitous and genial host. In this connection he naturally made an unusually wide circle of acquaintances, but aside from any popularity due to his prominence in this line he has been one of the best and most favorably known men in his section of Pennsylvania for years. His standing is unquestioned and well deserved.


KRICK, WILLIAM R.

p. 1366

Surnames: KRICK, REBER, FISHER, REEDY, LASH, HINNERSHITZ, YOUNG, ADAMS, LEAS, RIEGEL, RICKENBACH, BUSHONG, LEINBACH, NOECKER, FRYMOYER, HUMMA, LESSIG

William R. Krick, an influential citizen of Reading, Pa., who is well known among hotel men of the city as proprietor of the "Fifteenth Ward Hotel," was born in Reading, June 2, 1840, son of Peter and Susanna (Reber) Krick.

Adam Krick, the grandfather of William R., was born June 22, 1792, and died April 5, 1857, aged sixty-four years, nine months, fourteen days, being buried at Sinking Spring Church, of which he was a Reformed member, as well as chorister. He was an early school teacher of Berks county, was later the proprietor of a hotel in West Reading, which he himself erected, and was a well known and highly esteemed citizen of his day. On Nov. 30, 1811, he was married to Catherine Fisher, and they spent a married life of forty-five years, four months and five days. Their children were as follows: William; Peter, John; Maria; Susan; Abraham; and Rebecca, who married John Reedy, who died at Sinking Spring in 1906, in the ninety-fourth year of his age.

Peter Krick, the father of William R., was born in 1813, and died in 1872, being buried at the Charles Evans cemetery. In 1837 he came to Reading borough, locating in Northwest Ward, and there he became a tradesman and boat-builder for the Union and Schuylkill canals. He married Susanna Reber, daughter of Nathan Reber (1780-1844) and his wife Susanna Lash, born in 1783, and to this union there were born children as follows Catherine Anna, born in 1837, died single: Levi J., born in 1839, married Mary Ann Hinnershitz, and they had five children,---Joel, Anna, Emma, Monroe and Mary; William R.; Ellenora, born in 1841, who died young; Joel, born in 1844, who married Sarah Young; Adam, born in 1846, who married Ella Adams; Ella, born in 1847, who married William Leas; Peter, who married Mary Riegel; and Catherine, twin of Peter, who died aged thirteen years.

William R. Krick has been a resident of the city of Reading all of his life, with the exception of ten years when he was engaged in the boat building business with James Rickenbach at Leesport. For six years he was employed at Barbey's Brewery, and at different times worked at Jacob Bushong's paper mill. For some time he was engaged in hauling for the city and private individuals, having as many as nine horses and carts, and he is still engaged in this business to some extent, having three horses and carts. On Nov. 1, 1900, he engaged in the hotel business, which he has continued to the present time, and in addition to his hotel property, he owns a dwelling and two building lots in the Sixth Ward and one dwelling in the Fifteenth Ward. He is a member of the Junior Fire Company, with which he has been connected since reaching his majority, and he is a charter member of the Schuylkill Fire Company, as was his brother, Levi, who is now deceased. He is connected with the Veteran Fireman's Association, the Harmony Club, Nursery Literary Association, and Democratic Club.

In 1859 Mr. Krick was married to Catherine Leinbach who died in 1896 and who was the daughter of Joshua Leinbach and Hannah Noecker, and to this union there were born seven children: Adam; Harvey; Laura, who married Daniel Frymoyer; Ella, who married Henry Humma; Alice, who married Moses Lessig; Albert, and Peter.

Mr. Krick belongs to Zion Reformed Church, Reading.

Last Modified Thursday, 16-Oct-2008 20:55:01 EDT

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