Biographies from Historical and Biographical Annals by Morton Montgomery

KINTZER FAMILY

p. 894

Surnames: KINTZER, KURR, REAL, UNRUH, SAILER, LEISS, FILBERT, SCHONER, MOVER, SNYDER, STUPP, JONES, KURTZ, FIDLER, ULRICH, WENRICH, BROWN, BAER, GRETH, SEE, KNODERER, RUTH, FISHER, STOUDT, WERNER

KINTZER (I) Nicholas Kintzer, the progenitor of a family numerous in western Berks county, was born in Germany Nov. 15, 1715. When less than fifteen years old he crossed the ocean on the ship "Thistle," which arrived at Philadelphia Aug. 29, 1730, and he came to live in Tulpehocken township, Berks county, Pa., where he came became a substantial citizen. In 1759 he was assessed L16. which, reckoning $2.66 to the Pennsylvania pound, amounted to $42.56 of current coin. This pioneer settler died Jan. 20, 1794, in the seventy-ninth year of his age, and he is buried at the Host Church, of which he was a member. His grave is marked by a brown sandstone the inscription on which is still legible. Hie will, which was made Dec. 15, 1791, and probated March 5, 1794, is recorded in Will Book B, page 355. The executors were his son Jacob and Thomas Kurr, and the following children are mentioned in the document: Jacob; Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Kurr; Margaret, wife of Godfrey Real; Catharine, who died before her father, her children receiving her share; and Julian, deceased.

(II) Jacob Kintzer, son of Nicholas, obtained the plantation in Tulpehocken upon which his father lived and died, and there made his home, engaging in farming. He married Elizabeth Unruh, and they had a large family, among their children being: Johan (John), born in 1785, died in 1851; Adam, born July 28, 1788, died Feb. 24, 1860; George, born Oct. 18, 1795, died Aug. 28, 1825 (married Dec. 17, 1820, to Maria Sailer).

(III) Adam Kintzer, son of Jacob, born July 28, 1788, in western Berks county, was engaged in farming there all his life. He died Feb. 24, 1860, aged seventy-one years, six months, twenty-six days. He married Anna Maria Leiss, born in 1789, died in 1872, daughter of Christopher and Maria Elizabeth Leiss. Mr. and Mrs. Adam Kintzer are both buried at the Host Church. They had children as follows: Jacob; Michael; Isaac; William; Henry; John; Betzy, who married Gabriel Filbert; Mary, who married Andrew Schoner and later John Leiss; and Amanda, who married Adam Mover, of West Reading.

(IV) Michael Kintzer, son of Adam, was a lifelong farmer, living in Lower Heidelberg township, where he owned the old Kintzer homestead two miles north of Womelsdorf. He was born there Dec. 26, 1809, and died March 9, 1883. The farm on which he lived was a fine place of over one hundred acres, not far from Robesonia, now owned by Joseph Snyder. He and his family were members of St. Daniel's (Corner) Church at the time of his death, but he is buried at the Hain's Church, in the new cemetery, where the family has a fine lot. Mr. Kintzer was a member of the Reformed denomination, but his widow belongs to the Lutheran Church.

Michael Kintzer was married three times, first to Catharine Stupp, by whom he had four children, Frank, Israel, Adam and George. By his second marriage, to Maricha Jones, he had one son, Aaron, who died unmarried. To his third union, with Matilda Kurtz, who survives him, four children were born, on their old home in Lower Heidelberg township: Charles Lewis, Michael H., Rufus James and Annie M.

(V) Israel Kintzer, son of Michael, was born Nov. 9, 1830, and died Oct. 29, 1898. He and his wife are buried at Hain's Church. He was a lifelong farmer and a self-made man, starting out in the world with nothing and at the time of his death being one of the substantial men of his community and the owner of two fine farms. He was a deacon and elder in Hain's Reformed Church. Mr. Kintzer married Mary Ann Fidler, born Nov. 11, 1833, who died Jan. 10, 1890, daughter of David and Hannah (Ulrich) Fidler, and six children were born to this union: two daughters who died in infancy; Katie H., who married Michael Wenrich; David M.; Mary, who married William H. Brown; and Wilson, who married Adda Baer and resides at Sinking Spring, Pennsylvania.

(VI) David M. Kintzer, son of Israel, a farmer and business man of Heidelberg township, at the eastern end of the village of the Robesonia, was born Oct. 4, 1861, in Lower Heidelberg township. He was reared to agricultural pursuits, which he has followed all his life, working for his father until twenty-eight years of age, after which he was a tenant at the homestead for eight years. In 1900 he purchased his father's farm at the eastern end of the village of Robesonia, and there he has since resided. This tract is one of the best for its size - about sixteen acres - in the township. He also owns the seventy-two-acre tract adjoining, which was also one of the father's farms, and here he carries on general farming and truck raising, having stand No. 98, at Fourth and Penn streets, Reading market. He has a fine herd of live stock, his buildings are comfortable and substantial, and he owns the latest and most improved farm machinery. In addition Mr. Kintzer conducts a livery stable, having six horses and commanding a good trade. In politics he is a Democrat, and has been school director since 1898, having been honored with three successive elections. Since 1902 he has been the treasurer of the Robesonia Hose Company. Mr. Kintzer and his family are members of Hain's Reformed Church, of which he has been a deacon and elder.

On Feb. 13, 1886, Mr. Kintzer was married to Clara Greth, daughter of Joshua and Sophia Greth, the former a stonemason at the Blue Marsh. Three children have been born to this union: Bertha, who attended the West Chester State Normal School, is now a teacher in the public schools of Heidelberg township; Bessie, who graduated from the West Chester Normal School, is also a teacher; Robert S. is assisting his father on the farm.

(V) George Kintzer, son of Michael, was born Dec. 17, 1838, in Marion township, Berks county, and died Jan. 23, 1907, aged sixty-eight years, one month, six days. He was reared to farming, which vocation he followed all his life. When he was seven years old his parents moved to the Big Spring, in Heidelberg township, where he grew up. On Nov. 11, 1862, Mr. Kintzer was mustered into the United States service, having enlisted at Reading in Company A, 167th Pennsylvania Regiment; the captain of this company from its organization was Jonathan See, who later promoted to the rank of major for meritorious service. This regiment did much severe marching, built rifle pits, forts and trenches, was in the battle of the Deserted House (where their colonel, Charles A. Knoderer was fatally wounded) and in the fight at Suffolk, Va. It was mustered out at Reading Aug. 12, 1863.

Mr. Kintzer married Oct. 29, 1864, Elizabeth E. Ruth, born Sept. 29, 1845, daughter of Absalom and Annie (Fisher) Ruth, and three children came to this union: (1) Annie M., born Aug. 23, 1865, married William H. Fisher, and they had four children. Charles A., Frederick M., Harvey W. and Leah E. (2) Adam O., born Jan. 1, 1867, lives at his father's late residence in Berks county. He married Eva A. Stoudt, and they have two children, Ellen C. and Annie M. (3) Michael, born Aug. 24, 1870, lives at Hain's Church. He married Lydia A. Ruth, and they have one son, Lloyd A.

Mr. Kintzer purchased his late home in 1900. It consists of thirteen acres of good land in the vicinity of the Hain's Church, and on this place he died. He is buried at Hain's Church, in the East End cemetery, and was a prominent member of the Hain's Church, in which he served as elder. He was a Republican in his political convictions. He was a substantial farmer and much respected citizen, and his widow is held in equally high esteem. She still occupies the property at Hain's Church. Mr. Kintzer also owned a farm of sixty-six acres near Hain's Church, known as the Werner's old homestead in Lower Heidelberg township, a quarter mile east of Wernersville. This place he bought in 1890. It is now tenanted by his son Michael.


KINTZER, ISAAC Y.

p. 1369

Surnames: KINTZER, YEAGER, LEISS, BROWN, ZILLARS, BEIDEL, KLINE, REESER, SMITH, KEISER, KELLER, SCHUPP, KURTZ, BEHNEY

Isaac Y. Kintzer (deceased), at one time U. S. Internal Revenue Collector and warden of the Berks county prison, was born in Womelsdorf, Berks county, Pa., Aug. 2, 1837, son of John and Louisa (Yeager) Kintzer.

John George Kintzer was the emigrant ancestor of this family in America, he having settled along the Potomac river. His estate is still unsettled, and his lands along the river are now occupied by the United States Government. He had a son, George, who was the father of John Kintzer, grandfather of Isaac Y., who settled in Marion township, Berks county, and there owned several farms, and there died aged eighty-six years; he was buried at Host Church. He was three times married, his first wife being a Miss Leiss, by whom one son, John, was born. To his second marriage, to a Miss Brown, a child, Adam, was born, and he married (third) a Miss Zillars, who also bore him one child, Caroline, who married a Mr. Beidel. In religious belief he was a member of the Reformed Church, and in politics he was an old line Whig.

John Kintzer, father of Isaac Y., was reared upon a farm in Marion township, but when a young man removed to Womelsdorf, operating a farm on the outskirts of that borough, and following agricultural pursuits all of his life, dying in 1886, at the age of ninety. His wife passed away in 1902, when eighty-four years old. In politics a Democrat, in religion he was a member of the Reformed Church, and he served many years as a deacon. He and his estimable wife were the parents of four children, viz.: Isaac; John H., deceased; Rebecca, who married William Kline, of Reading; and Elizabeth, who married William Reeser, of Reading.

Isaac Yeager Kintzer received his literary training in the schools of Womelsdorf, and commenced teaching school when but a boy, continuing to act in that capacity for twelve terms. Mr. Kintzer was then elected justice-of-the-peace, an office he filled very efficiently for seventeen years, resigning his last commission to accept the position of Deputy Revenue Collector, during Clevelands first administration. This position he held for a term of four years, and in 1894 was elected warden of the Berks County Prison. This important office Mr. Kintzer filled for a period of four years, and it is scarcely too much to say that he was one of the most satisfactory incumbents of that office that the county ever had. It was during his superintendence that many improvements were inaugurated, these Including the placing of electric lights and an entire change made in the sanitary conditions. Both he and his estimable wife took a personal interest in the charges under their control, and even so captious a body as prisoners were entirely satisfied with the food provided for them. After leaving this position Mr. Kintzer engaged in the grocery business at Third and Franklin streets, and here he was very successful. Before coming to Reading, however, Mr. Kintzer was engaged for seven years in Womelsdorf, and for one year in Robesonia in the hotel business.

Mr. Kintzer was married (first) in 1858 to Elvina Smith, and to them were born six children: Valeria married H. P. Keiser, Esq., of Reading, Pa.; John, of Fayette county, is a clerk with the Pittsburg Coal & Coke Co.; Lizzie, who died in October, 1908, married E. M. Keller; Nova D. married George Schupp; Mary married William Kurtz of Womelsdorf; and William, unmarried, is of Reading. Mrs. Kintzer died in 1883, and in 1885 Mr. Kintzer married (second) Amelia S. Behney, of Marion township, Berks Co., Pa. Mr. Kintzer was a member of the United American Mechanics from 1857, and was also connected with the K. G. E. at Womelsdorf and the K. of P. of Robesonia. In politics he was a Democrat and in religion was a member of the Lutheran Church. Mr. Kintzer died Jan. 4, 1907.


KINTZER, JOHN A.

p. 1330

Surnames: KINTZER, RUTH, KURR, REAL, UNRUH, LEISS, FILBERT, LESS, SHOWER, MOYER, SEILER, ZELLER, BEIDLER, FISHER, BRIGHT, RUTH, ARNOLD, SMITH, MILLER, HIGH, ERMENTROUT, SENIOR

John A. Kintzer, a farmer of Spring township and proprietor of the "West Reading Hotel," at West Reading, Berks county, was born March 9, 1855, at Womelsdorf, this county, son of Adam and Mary (Ruth) Kintzer. He is a descendant of Nicholas Kintzer.

(I) Nicholas Kintzer, the progenitor of a family numerous in western Berks county, was born in Germany, Nov. 15, 1715. When less than fifteen years old, he crossed the ocean on the ship "Thistle," which arrived at Philadelphia Aug. 29, 1730, and he came to live in Tulpehocken township, Berks Co., Pa., where he became a substantial citizen. In 1759 he was assessed sixteen pounds, which, reckoning $2.66 to the Pennsylvania pound, amounted to $42.56 of current coin. This pioneer settler died Jan. 20, 1794, in the seventy-ninth year of his age, and he is buried at the Host Church, of which he was a member. His grave is marked by a brown sandstone, the inscription on which is still legible. His will, which was made Dec. 15, 1791, and probated March 5, 1794, is recorded in Will Book B, page 355. The executors were his son Jacob and Thomas Kurr, and the following children are mentioned in the document; Jacob; Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Kurr; Margaret, wife of Godfry Real; Catharine, who died before her father, her children receiving her share; and Julian, deceased.

(II) Jacob Kintzer, son of Nicholas, obtained the plantation in Tulpehocken upon which his father lived and died, and there made his home, engaging in farming. He married Elizabeth Unruh, and they had a large family, among their children being: Johan (Johannes), born 1785, died in 1851; Adam, born July 28, 1788, died Feb. 24, 1860; George, born Oct. 18, 1795, died Aug. 28, 1825. Of these, Adam married Anna Maria Leiss, born 1789, died in 1872, daughter of Christopher and Maria Elizabeth Leiss, and they are both buried at Host. They had children: Jacob, Michael, Isaac, William, Henry, John, Betzy, who married Gabriel Filbert; Mary, who married Charles Shower and later John Less; and Amanda, who married Adam Moyer, of West Reading. George, the youngest son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Unruh) Kintzer, was married Dec. 17, 1820, to Maria Seiler.

(III) Johannes Kintzer, son of Jacob, was born Jan. 1, 1785, and died Sept. 16, 1851. He was buried at the Host Church in Tulpehocken township. He was a lifelong resident of Marion township near the Charming Forge, where he owned several large farms, and was a well-known citizen, of much influence, in his day. By his first wife he had one child, Adam. By his second marriage, to Sarah Zeller, born Sept. 15, 1793, died Nov. 25, 1876, Johannes Kintzer had among other children: Mrs. Harry Beidler and John, the latter the father of Isaac Kintzer, who for many years was warden of Berks county.

(IV) Adam Kintzer, born in 1820 in Marion township, died in 1875, after a life spent in agricultural pursuits. He was a well-known citizen of his day, and for three years served with great credit as under steward to Steward Silas W. Fisher, at the county almshouse. Fraternally he was connected with the Odd Fellows. He was a member of the Zions Reformed Church at Womesldorf, and is buried at that place. Adam Kintzer married Mary Ruth, born in 1822, daughter of Adam Ruth; she died very suddenly in 1886, while seated at the dinner table. Six children were born to Adam and Mary (Ruth) Kintzer, namely Rebecca, who married George Bright, of Womelsdorf; Mary Ann, who married Henry Arnold, of Reading; Anna, who married Elijah Smith, of West Reading; Caroline, deceased, who married Wellington Fisher, deceased, former clerk of the county almshouse; Sarah, who married John Miller, of Wernersville; and John A.

(V) John A. Kintzer lived in the borough of Womelsdorf until nine years of age, when his father removed to a farm near the town, and there he worked until 1896. He began farming on his own account in 1890, operating his own farm of 238 acres for four years, and then sold out to become the proprietor of the "Lebanon Valley House," Wernersville, which he conducted very successfully for four years. This hotel Mr. Kintzer made one of the leading houses in the county, having many summer boarders from Philadelphia, Germantown, West Chester and Jersey City. In the fall of 1900 he purchased the good-will and fixtures of the "West Reading Hotel," which he has since successfully conducted. He is also managing the well-known Samuel Beidler farm in Spring township, consisting of ninety-five acres, now the property of Mrs. William P. High. This property is finely improved, having large, substantial buildings, and is furnished with the latest and best machinery. A large herd of cattle is raised there annually. In addition to this place, Mr. Kintzer owns a tract of twenty-eight acres in Lower Heidelberg township, one of the best truck farms in that township. Mr. Kintzer is an able agriculturist, is enterprising and progressive, and his manner of doing business has gained him many friends in West Reading. In politics he is a Democrat, and while a resident of Lower Heidelberg township he served as a member of the school board for nine consecutive years. He was also a delegate to many county conventions, and assisted in nominating Hon. James N. Ermentrout, President Judge of the Court of Common Please, for his second term. Socially, he is connected with the Fraternal Order of Eagles, Aerie No. 66, of Reading. He and his family are members of Hains Reformed Church, of Wernersville.

On Oct. 18, 1879, Mr. Kintzer was united in marriage with Adaline Ruth, born in 1858, daughter of Reuben H. and Catharine (Ruth) Ruth, of Lower Heidelberg township. One child has been born to this union, Reuben W., local manager of the Bell Telephone Company at Carbondale, Pa., who married Mamie Senior, of Reading; they have two children, May A. and John S


KINTZER, MICHAEL

p. 873 Surnames: KINTZER, KURR, REAL, UNRUH, SAILER, LEISS, FILBERT, SCHOENER, MOYER, STUPP, JONES, KURTZ, ALTHOUSE, ZACHARIAS, MOYER, GRETH

Michael Kintzer, a farmer of Lower Heidelberg township, Berks county, born Dec. 26, 1809, on the old Kintzer homestead there, died March 9, 1883. He was a great-grandson of Nicholas Kintzer, the founder of the family in this country, tracing his line through Jacob, son of the emigrant; and Adam, son of Jacob.

(I) Nicholas Kintzer, the progenitor of a family numerous in western Berks county, was born in Germany Nov. 15, 1715. When less than fifteen years old he crossed the ocean on the ship "Thistle," which arrived at Philadelphia, Aug. 29, 1730, and he came to live in Tulpehocken township, Berks Co., Pa., where he became a substantial citizen. In 1759 he was assessed 16 which, reckoning $2.66 to the Pennsylvania pound, amounted to $42.56 of current coin. This pioneer settler died Jan. 20, 1794, in the seventy-ninth year of his age, and he is buried at the Host Church, of which he was a member. His grave is marked by a brown sandstone the inscription on which is still legible. His will, which was made Dec. 15, 1791, and probated March 5, 1794, is recorded in Will Book B, page 355. The executors were his son Jacob and Thomas Kurr, and the following children are mentioned in the document: Jacob; Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Kurr; Margaret, wife of Godfrey Real; Catharine, who died before her father, her children receiving her share; and Julian, deceased.

(II) Jacob Kintzer, son of Nicholas, obtained the plantation in Tulpehocken upon which his father lived and died, and there made his home, engaging in farming. He married Elizabeth Unruh and they had a large family, among their children being: Johan (John), born in 1785, died in 1851; Adam, born July 28, 1788, died Feb. 24, 1860; George, born Oct. 18, 1795, died Aug 28, 1825 (married Dec. 17, 1820, to Maria Sailer).

(III) Adam Kintzer, son of Jacob, born July 28, 1788, in western Berks county, was engaged in farming there all his life. He died Feb. 24, 1860, aged seventy-one years, six months, twenty-six days. He married Anna Maria Leiss, born in 1789, died in 1872, daughter of Christopher and Maria Elizabeth Leiss. Mr. and Mrs. Adam Kintzer are both buried at the Host Church. They had children as follows: Jacob; Michael; Isaac; William; Henry; John; Betzy, who married Gabriel Filbert; Mary, who married Andrew Schoener, and later John Leiss; and Amanda, who married Adam Moyer, of West Reading.

(IV) Michael Kintzer, son of Adam, was a lifelong farmer, living in Lower Heidelberg township, where he owned the old Kintzer homestead two miles north of Womelsdorf. Here he made his home for many years, and here he died March 9, 1883, at the age of seventy-three. He and his family were members of St. Daniel's (Corner) Church at the time of his death, but he is buried at the Hain's church, in the new cemetery, where the Kintzers have a fine lot.

Michael Kintzer was married three times, first to Catharine Stupp, by whom he had four children, Frank, Israel, Adam and George. By his second marriage, to Maricha Jones, he had one son, Aaron, who died unmarried. By his third union, with Matilda Kurtz, who survives him, he had four children, all born on their old home in Lower Heidelberg township: (1) Charles Lewis, born May 22, 1861, is married to Alice Althouse, and lives at No. 311 West Oley Street, Reading, Pa. (2) Michael H., born Jan. 17, 1863, married Kate Zacharias, and they have three children, Charles I., Chester W., and Leroy Z. (3) Rufus James, born April 11, 1866, a resident of Wernersville, Berks County, married Rachel Moyer, and they have two children, Lizzie M. and Michael N. (4) Annie M., born April 12, 1871, is the wife of Charles A. Greth.

Mrs. Matilda (Kurtz) Kintzer, widow of Michael Kintzer, was born Aug. 2, 1835, in North Heidelberg township, and was reared upon a farm. When twenty-five years old she became the wife of Michael Kintzer, as previously mentioned. After Mr. Kintzer's death she lived on a tract of eight acres which she owns until the spring of 1905, when she went to make her home with her son C. Lewis Kintzer, in Reading. She spends the greater part of warm weather with her son, James, and her daughter, Mrs. Greth, in Lower Heidelberg township. Mr. Kintzer was a member of the Reformed denomination, but Mrs. Kintzer is a Lutheran in religious faith. She is an active woman, well preserved in spite of her advanced age, and is a pleasant conversationalist, taking an interest in the life of the community. She still uses the German language, having never learned English.


KIRBY, STANLY J.

p. 818

Surnames: KIRBY, LEVAN, MERKEL, KOLLER, BIEHL, KAUFFMAN, WIEDENHAMMER, GEEHR, HOCH, MILLER, GORMAN

Few men are better known in Maiden-creek township than Stanly J. Kirby, the founder of Kirbyville, in which place he resides, his mansion being situated along the well-known Easton Road, surrounded by a large well-kept lawn. Fine shade trees, under which are placed comfortable settees, add to the external comfort of this home, while the interior is in every way most attractive. Mr. Kirby has contributed in many ways to the growth, prosperity and advancement of his town, township and county. He was born in Maiden-creek township, Berks county, March 14, 1832, son of Dr. David and Florenda (Levan) Kirby, and is of English descent.

The Kirby family was founded in America by four brothers, one of whom, Stanly, settled in Maiden-creek township, where he was engaged in the cultivation of the soil. The other brothers settled in different parts of the country--one in New York City, one in Illinois (a descendant of whom became very wealthy in the mining industry), and one in Chester county. In the old Kirby family Bible this record is found of the family in England; William, 1703; Joseph 1722; Thomas, 1724; John 1726; Mary, 1728; Peter, 1732; Elizabeth, 1734; Stanly (1703-1803); Michael, 1737. The second youngest of the family was the great-grandfather of Stanly J., of Kirbyville, and he had a son Stanly, who perpetuated the honored name.

Stanly Kirby, grandfather of Stanly J., was a most prominent citizen and prosperous farmer of Berks county. He was born in Maiden-creek township and was a lifelong resident of that district, being a most prominent political factor in his day, serving in the high office of county commissioner from 1827-1830. He married Hannah Merkel, daughter of Casper Merkel, and to them were born these children: Solomon; David; Hannah (who married David Koller); and nine others who died before reaching maturity.

Dr. David Kirby was born Feb. 25, 18907, and died April 24, 1878. He was reared upon his father's farm, but on attaining his majority studied medicine, received his diploma, and was considered on of the most skilled physicians of his day. His last years were spent at the home of his son, Stanly J., and he passed away April 24, 1878. He married Florenda Levan, born at Kutztown, where she died May 3, 1889, daughter of Jacob and Rose Levan, and to this union were born: Stanly J.; and Hannah, widow of the late Henry Biehl, who was a prominent merchant of his time.

Stanly J. Kirby received his education in the common schools of his time and in the State Normal school at West Chester, Pa. His boyhood days were spent on the West Chester, Pa. His boyhood days were spent on the farm, and on reaching his twenty-first year he removed to the farm which he had received by inheritance from his grandfather, engaging actively in agricultural pursuits until 1862. In this year he removed to his present place, where he has since continued. Mr. Kirby's community honors and respects him, and looks upon him as its friend and leader. He is a large tax payer, owning beside his residence farm a farm of 135 acres of the best land of Maiden-creek township and ore of 194 acres.

On Oct. 26, 1862, Mr. Kirby married (first ) Caroline Kauffman, daughter of Daniel and Mary (Wiedenhammer) Kauffman, and she died May 14, 1895, the mother of three children, all of whom died in their infancy. Mr. Kirby's second marriage, Dec. 1, 1896, was to Miss Mary M. Geehr, of Kutztown, daughter of Jacob C. and Mary (Hoch) Geehr, and a lineal descendant of Col. Balser Geehr of Revolutionary fame. The parents of Mrs. Kirby had children as follows: Titus E., a hide broker in New York City, where he died in 1901; Mary M.; Katie, who is widely known as a great church worker; Thomas B., who died in his fourth year; and Florence M., wife of Hon. Edward Y. Miller, the present military governor of Philippines.

Mr. Stanly J. Kirby is the founder of Kirbyville, of which he has been postmaster six years, and he has served in every position except supervisor and constable. For twenty-four years he was school director and was treasurer for thirty years. He is a director of Sinking Spring Fire Insurance Company, a position he has held for forty-five years. In politics he is a stanch Democrat. He is a member of Lodge No. 377, F.& A. M., of Kutztown, and the Jr. O. U. A. M. of Fleetwood. In religious faith he is inclined toward the Lutheran Church and his wife is connected with the United Evangelical.

Mr. Kirby is the possessor of many valuable and interesting relics, among them two "grandfather' clocks, one of which is known to be 116 years old (and very likely is 150 years old), which was owned by Stanly Kirby I, and another which belonged to Solomon Kirby, which is at least eighty years old. Mr. Kirby has a gold pen with a silver holder which he has used continuously since 1850. He has the original will of his great-grandfather, and deeds and other legal papers that have been in the Kirby family since 1700. Mr. Kirby is a first cousin of the last U.S. Senator Arthur Pugh Gorman, the latter's mother and Mr. Kirby's mother having been sisters.


KIRK, NICHOLAS H.

p. 1666 Surnames: KIRK, BROWN, KIMBALL, HOUSE, STAPLES

Nicholas H. Kirk, a well-known resident of Perry township, who is superintendent of Schuylkill Valley Clay Manufacturing Company, at Shoemakersville, was born in Philadelphia, Feb. 9, 1867, son of David E. Kirk, of that city.

William Haines Kirk of Chester county, who was the grandfather of Nicholas H., was born in 1811 and died in 1897. He was twice married, his first wife being a Miss Brown, by whom he had four children: David E.; Hannah, m. Anson Kimball; George, who died young; and Rufus, m. Sarah House. His second wife was Mary House, sister of his sons wife, and to them were born two children. David E. Kirk, of the above family, was born in Lower Nottingham township, Chester county, in 1836, and in 1865 removed to Philadelphia. He married Rachel House, of Chester county, and Nicholas H., above mentioned, was the only child of this union.

Nicholas H. Kirk was educated in the public schools, and after graduating from the senior class of the grammar school qualified himself for business by taking a course in the Crittenden Commercial College, then following bookkeeping for ten years. He also filled the position of manager for a cement and coal firm for eight years until 1900, when he located at Shoemakersville, Berks county, and at this place became superintendent of the Schuylkill Valley Clay Manufacturing Company, having successfully directed its operations to the present time. It is one of the largest industrial plants operated in the Schuylkill Valley above Reading. Mr. Kirk is held in high esteem by his fellow-townsmen and in 1903 was elected a school director of the township, but after a year was obliged to resign, his duties at the Clay works demanding all of his time and attention, for, as one of the directors of the Board, he takes an active part in the management of the enterprise.

Mr. Kirk was married to Annie E. Staples of Philadelphia in 1888, and three children were born to this union: Ethel, Edith and Edwin.


KIRKHOFF, JACOB G.

p.1482

Surnames: KIRKHOFF, BISHOP, MINNER, TROUP, MORRIS, YOCUM, RAPP, MURPHY, HAUCK, SAUSEN, LEWIS, SCHWARTZ, HIESTER, GICKER, REESER, CHRIST, SNYDER, KRAMER

Jacob G. Kirkhoff is engaged in farming and sawmilling in Penn township, Berks County, where he owns two farms. He was born March 4, 1866, in Bern township, this county, son of Bishop Kirkhoff and grandson of John B. Kirkhoff.

Henry Kirkhoff, his great-grandfather, was the first of this family to come to America. He was a native of Switzerland, where his father was a clockmaker, and he also learned that trade, which he continued to follow after his emigration to this country. He landed at Philadelphia in 1799, when sixteen years old, and a few years later settled in Extern township, Berks county were made by him and testify to his skill as a mechanic. His grandson, William R. Kirkhoff, of Reading, has the first clock he made in America. He died in Extern township. Henry Kirkhoff was twice married, his first marriage being to Susan Bishop, and the children by that union were as follows: Susan married Jacob Minner and they died in Reading; Mary married a Mr. Troup and they died in Reading; Anna married Horatio Morris and they also died in Reading; a daughter died in infancy; John B. is mentioned later. For his second wife Henry Kirkhoff married a Yocum, of Douglassville, this county, and they had one son, William, who lived at Douglassville.

John B. Kirkhoff, son of Henry, was born Oct. 4, 1804, at Philadelphia, and was but a small boy when his parents removed to Exeter township, Berks county, where he passed the rest of his life, dying there Aug. 19, 1880. He is buried in the Aulenbach cemetery, at Reading. By occupation he was a farmer. John B. Kirkhoff married Hannah Rapp, daughter of Michael and Catherine (Murphy) Rapp, and to them was born a family of eight children, as follows: Margaret, unmarried, lives in Reading; Catharine married Samuel Hauck and lives in Exeter township; Bishop was the father of Jacob G. Kirkhoff; Anna married John K. Sausen and lives in Reading; Susan married Thomas Lewis and lives at Neversink, Berks county; Emma married Michael Sausen and lives in Reading; Ida married Samuel Lewis, and both are deceased; followed farming for several years, in 1891 moving to Reading, where he was in the employ of the Philadelphia & Reading Company and later of the Arrowsmith Electric Company. William R. Kirkhoff now resides at No. 1345 Muhlenberg Street, Reading. He married Catharine Schwartz, daughter of James and Elizabeth (Hiester) Schwartz, and they have had the following named children: Ida E., Susan E., James S., Catharine L., Robert E., Maria M. and William T.

Bishop Kirkhoff, son of John B., was born in Exeter township and died there when only twenty-seven years old. He is buried at the Aulenbach cemetery, Reading. Mr. Kirkhoff was a farmer by occupation. He married Jane Gicker, daughter of Jacob Gicker, the latter the wife of James Reeser, of Penn township.

Jacob G. Kirkhoff attended the Snyder school in Penn township, where he was reared, having come to that township with his mother when eight years old. He worked upon the farm from youth, and in 1887 began farming in Centre township on his own account, farming there for ten years. He then bought the well-known James M. Christ farm in Penn township, near Garfield, consisting of ninety-one acres, and besides he owns and operates a farm of 118 acres in Centre township. In 1905 he embarked in the sawmill business, and he has a large patronage in that line, in which he has made as great a success as he has in his agricultural work.

Mr. Kirkhoff married Ida Snyder, daughter of Jacob and Kate (Kramer) Snyder, and they have had three children, Albert, Harvey and James. Mr. Kirkhoff is a Reformed member of Belleman's Church and a prominent worker in that congregation, having served as deacon. He is a Democrat in politics, and while a resident of Centre township was elected to the office of school director.


KISSINGER, A. N.

p. 503

Surnames: KISSINGER, YOST, DICK, DUBSON, BIRCH, BRINER, SPOHN, WARREN

A. N. Kissinger, manager and owner of the extensive storage, auction and flour house at Nos. 31-35 South Eighth street, as well as president and general manager of the well-known Farmers' Market House, at Reading, Berks Co., Pa., is rated as one of the most substantial and progressive business men of the Keystone State. He is a son of Washington S. and Elizabeth (Yost) Kissinger, born Dec. 5, 1850.

Washington S. Kissinger was accounted a man of unusual natural force and broad business capacity. After receiving but an imperfect common school education, at Reading, he became employed, while still quite young, on the canal near that city. Later he located in Reading, and in time became prominent in the lime and sand business, building also the famous Farmers' Market House. At the time of his death in November, 1873, he was not only an acknowledged business leader and a progressive citizen, but the owner and operator of several valuable farms in Berks county. His wife, Elizabeth Yost, died in Reading at the age of seventy-three. Their children, besides A. N., were: Harry A., a wholesale grain dealer at Birdsboro, Berks county; George W., formerly a sign painter and skilled mechanic; Mrs. Mary A. Dick, widow of the late Henry D. Dick, of No. 106 South Ninth street, Reading; and Mrs. Susan Dubson, living near Blandon, Berks county.

A. N. Kissinger received a common school education in the schools of Berks county, locating at Reading, April 1, 1870, and entering the employ of C. S. Birch & Co. In the following year he established a clothing and shoe business, later he and his father also associating themselves at the same location, No. 929 Penn street, in the flour and feed business, continuing together until the death of the latter in 1873. The Market House business was founded May 10, 1871, and July 16, 1871, A. N. Kissinger assumed its active management. He has continued in that capacity ever since, has been one of the owners, and the manager and treasurer of the Farmers' Market House. Under Mr. Kissinger's management extensive and important improvements have been made in the original house erected by his father, so that he now as president, general manager and one of the largest stockholders controls the largest and most complete market in the city. This was incorporated in January, 1907, as the Farmers' Market House Company. For the accommodation of out-of-town patrons he has erected a three-story stable, with sleeping apartments attached.

Kissinger's Storage House is a four-story structure, 60x120 feet in dimensions, weekly and semi-weekly sales being held therein. On March 1, 1885, C. Carroll Briner was admitted to partnership in the feed, flour and storage business under the firm name of Kissinger & Briner, the location of the house being as at present. This continued till Mr. Briner's retirement in February, 1897, after which the firm of Kissinger & Son was formed. This continued four years, since which time Mr. Kissinger has been sole proprietor. Under Mr. Kissinger's energetic and able management, the business has developed to large proportions. On Jan. 17, 1907, in company with others he formed the Kissinger Market House Company, embracing the following markets: Nos. 2, 3 and 4, located at Ninth and Cherry street, Peach and Cherry streets, and Nos. 834-836 Penn street. They have recently inaugurated the successful Saturday afternoon and evening market, in addition to their tri-weekly markets.

Personally Mr. Kissinger has reached a leadership in the business field in a time of life which makes it probable that his future will bring him into even more than State prominence. Mr. Kissinger is connected with no secret organizations, although socially he is very genial and popular. For his standing he has depended upon no extraneous efforts, solely upon his individual honesty, assiduity and ability. He is a member of Trinity Lutheran Church, and has served as a vestryman of that organization at different times for nine years.

On April 16, 1874, Mr. Kissinger was married to Miss Sallie R. Spohn, of Reading. She died March 11, 1903, leaving three children: Clifford W., Sarah E. and Anita M. On Oct. 19, 1904, he married (second) Miss Mary L. Warren, of Ohio, and to this union has been born a son, Warren Nicholas. Mr. and Mrs. Kissinger reside at their comfortable home, No. 1030 Penn street, Reading, enjoying the comfort and culture attendant upon the prosperity and intelligence of the modern business man.


88-1443 Kissinger, Harvey D. --

KISSINGER, HARVEY D.

p. 1443

Surnames: KISSINGER, LENGEL, SCHMALTZ, GAUL, RUTH, HINNERSHITZ, KRICK

Harvey D. Kissinger, proprietor of the "Krick House," situated at No. 670 Schuylkill avenue, Reading, Pa., was born Jan. 13, 1868, in Bern township, Berks county, son of Adam and Sarah (Lengel) Kissinger.

Johan Kissinger, great-great-grandfather of Harvey D., was a native of Germany. He owned a farm in Alsace township, Berks county, Pa., above what was known as "Close's Hotel," the property now being owned by the Ebling estate. His two children were: John and Betsy. The latter did not like her adopted country, and suddenly disappeared, nothing being heard from her until after the death of her father, when she returned, after the estate had already been settled. Her share was paid her, however, although it almost caused the financial embarrassment of her only brother, John. Johan Kissinger was buried in the private burial ground in what is now Muhlenberg township, near Brooks Locks, or the Carpenter Steel Works.

John Kissinger, great-grandfather of Harvey D., lived in Alsace township, where he carried on agricultural pursuits, owning a tract of thirty acres of land. He was buried in the family burial ground. His children were: Abraham, Lydia, John, Jacob, Samuel, Solomon and David.

Abraham Kissinger, grandfather of Harvey D., was born in 1800, in Alsace township (now Muhlenberg), and died aged thirty-seven years, being buried in the private burial ground on his farm. He married Hannah Schmaltz, daughter of Christopher Schmaltz, and they had four children, as follows: Daniel and Henry, who both died aged one year; Hannah, m. to Amos Gaul; and Adam.

Adam Kissinger, father of Harvey D., was born July 31, 1833, in Alsace township, and was reared to farming, an occupation which he followed until twenty-one years of age, at which time he went to work in the brick yards and there continued for three years. For twelve summers he was employed in work on the Schuylkill canal, and from 1870 until 1904 tended the Kissinger Locks on the canal, coming to Reading in the latter year, since which time he has been living at No. 800 Schuylkill avenue, with his nephew, Morris Ruth, whom he reared from infancy. In 1854 Mr. Kissinger was married to Sarah Lengel, who died June 21, 1890, aged fifty-seven years. They had the following children: Emma, Rebecca, Henry, Harvey D., Jacob and Hannah (m. to William Hinnershitz).

Harvey D. Kissinger accompanied his parents to the Kissinger Locks when two years of age, and lived at home until his marriage in September, 1887. For seven years he was employed at the American Iron & Steel Company's plant, then known as Sternbergh's, and for five years he was in the employ of the Keystone Rolling Mills, after which he worked at brick-making until being engaged as bar clerk with P. Monroe Krick, his brother-in-law. In the spring of 1905, Mr. Kissinger succeeded Mr. Krick, who retired, and he has continued to conduct the "Krick House" to the present time with much success. In addition to his hotel, Mr. Kissinger owns several houses in the Fifteenth ward. He is a popular member of the Schuylkill Fire Company and the Bar Tenders' Association.

Mr. Kissinger was married to Mary A. H. Krick, born Dec. 18, 1870, daughter of Levi J. R. and Mary (Hinnershitz) Krick, and she died April 27, 1904, aged thirty-three years, four months, nine days. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Kissinger, namely: Arthur L., born April 1, 1888; William H., July 28, 1901; and Mamie Catharine, May 3, 1898.

Last Modified Thursday, 16-Oct-2008 20:54:53 EDT

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