Biographies from Historical and Biographical Annals by Morton Montgomery

KIEFFER, E. C. (M.D.)

p. 1492

Surnames: KIEFFER, ZENTMYER, MISSLY

E. C. Kieffer, M. D., physician and surgeon at Reading, with offices at No. 810 North Fifth street, enjoys a large practice, and has been connected with some of the public medical institutions of this city. Dr. Kieffer was born Nov. 8, 1873, at Hagerstown, Md., son of Samuel and Mary Jane (Zentmyer) Kieffer.

Dr. Kieffer was primarily educated in the common schools of Maryland, subsequently entered Juniata College, and in 1895 he became a student in the Philadelphia Medico Chirurgical College, where he took a two years course and graduated in 1899. Dr. Kieffer than settled at Reading for the practice of his profession, shortly after being appointed house physician at St. Josephs hospital. After the termination of his services at this institution, he located on Tenth street, where he remained some time and then moved to his present very desirable location. Dr. Kieffer has been very successful, and numbers among his patients some of the best people of Reading.

Dr. Kieffer married Ella G. Missly, and they have one child: Mary Isabel. Fraternally he belongs to Lodge No. 62, F. & A. M., Reading Chapter, R. A. M., De Molay Commandery, K. T. He is professionally connected with the Reading Medical Association, and the Berks County Medical Society. In politics the Doctor is independent.


KIEFFER, LEWIS M.

p. 915

Surnames: KIEFFER, SELL, BIEBER, MERKEL, SHERIDAN, HOCH, SCHAEFFER, RHODE, HERBINE, SCHLEGEL, DEYSHER

Lewis M. Kieffer, a prominent auctioneer of Berks county, also engaged in the farming implement business, is a resident of Fleetwood, Pa. He was born May 8, 1858, in Richmond township, near Lyons, on land adjoining the original Kieffer homestead, which is now in possession of Nicholas Kieffer, a cousin of Lewis M.

Jacob Kieffer, grandfather of Lewis M., lived in Richmond township, and owned the excellent farm just referred to. He married Annie Sell, and to him and his wife were born these children: Peter; Rebecca, the wife of Jonathan Bieber, a prosperous farmer of Maxatawny; and Valentine.

Valentine Kieffer was a farmer and resident property owner of Richmond township, owning 150 acres of excellent farm land near Lyons. In politics he was a Democrat, but never cared for office. He married Maria Merkel, daughter of Benjamin and Catherine (Sheridan) Merkel, of Richmond township, and they had children as follows: Sarah, the wife of Abner Hoch, of Lyons, Pa.; Andora, the wife of Frank Schaeffer, of Fleetwood; Lewis M.; Alvin J., of Reading; George A., of Reading; Laura, who died at the age of ten years; Edward, of Reading; Emma, who married Levi Rhode of Lyons; Charles D., of Reading; Ella, who married Harry Herbine, a farmer of Exeter township; and Valentine M., who resides in Reading.

Lewis M. Kieffer was reared to farm work, living upon his father's homestead until twenty-five years of age. His early intellectual training was secured in the common schools of his native township, and this was supplemented by a course at the Keystone State Normal School at Kutztown. Upon leaving the latter institution Mr. Kieffer engaged in school teaching, which he followed successfully in Richmond township for eight terms, and about this time became prominent as an auctioneer, his services since that time having been sought in every section of Berks county east of the Schuylkill, as well as across the river in Schuylkill county. With possibly a few exceptions he has cried more sales than any other man in Berks county, averaging more than 100 sales per year for the past quarter century. Mr. Kieffer has also engaged in selling farming implements, being employed by the Schaeffer, Merkel Co., of Fleetwood, for more than seventeen years, and is now selling harvesters and mowers for the Milwaukee Harvester Company.

Mr. Kieffer was married July 9, 1887, to Miss Mary E. D. Schlegel, daughter of Abraham and Annie (Deysher) Schlegel, of Richmond township, and to this union were born: Nora E., Lloyd R., F. Geneva, Paul A., and Oliver E. Mr. Kieffer has been honored on several occasions by his fellow citizens who have elected him as councilman, in which capacity he served most efficiently, acting as secretary of the council for two years, and as president of that body for one year. In politics he is a stanch Democrat. He is a member of St. Paul's Union Church of Fleetwood, belonging to the Reformed denomination. Mr. Kieffer and his family live in his fine brick residence in Fleetwood.


KILLIAN, MONROE C.

p. 1149

Surnames: KILLIAN, COLDREN, LESSLEY, STEFFEY, WINEHOLD, SPATZ, SNADER

Monroe C. Killian, a well-known resident of Mohnton, where he is employed in the Wyomissing Hosiery factory, was born in Muddy Creek, Lancaster county, Sept. 8, 1869, son of Rudolph and Catherine (Coldren) Killian.

Rudolph Killian, Sr., grandfather of Monroe C., was a farmer of Lancaster county, being a large land owner in East End township, where he died. He married Millie Lessley, and their children were: Samuel, Sophia, Henry, Rudolph, Emanuel and Maggie.

Rudolph Killian, son of Rudolph, Sr., and father of Monroe C., was born in Lancaster count, near Terre Hill, and for several years manufactured cigars, also having the stage route between Lancaster and Terre Hill and Reading for eight years, or two terms. He also carried on farming, but is now engaged in a livery and general hauling business, and owns a tract of land at Terre Hill. Mr. Killian married Catherine Coldren, daughter of Peter and Catherine (Steffey) Coldren, and to them were born children as follows: Wayne, of Montgomery, Ill.; Diller, of Brownstown, Pa.; Kinser, deceased; Monroe C.; Mary, m. to Jacob Winehold, resides at Bowmanville, Pa.

Monroe C. Killian spent his school days in Lancaster county, and learned the cigar making trade with his father, which he followed for two years, then driving an express train at Terre Hill, during this time attending school in the winter months. At the age of sixteen years, he began driving a stage between Terre Hill and Lancaster, Pa., and this he followed for seven years ? three years to Lancaster, and four years between Terre Hill and Reading. He then did hauling for three years for his father, and in 1897 came to Mohnton, where he was engaged in J. H. Spatz & Co.'s straw hat factory, remaining there three years. The next two years were spent farming in Spring township, where he purchased land, after which he engaged in a draying business at Mohnton, which he followed for three years. After one year spent in the Spatz planing mill, in 1906 he was employed by the Wyomissing Hosiery mills, where he has continued to the present time as general utility man.

On July 21, 1897, Mr. Killian was united in marriage with Miss Sue E. Spatz, daughter of John H. and Mary (Snader) Spatz, a complete history of this family being found in another part of this volume. To this union there were born these children: M. Phamia and John Randolph. In politics Mr. Killian is an independent voter, casting his ballot for the man he thinks best fitted for the office. He is a member of the Woodmen of America. Mrs. Killian is connected with the Evangelical Association of Mohnton, and is a teacher in the Sunday-school, and for several years was teacher of the infant class.

The pleasant home of Mr. and Mrs. Killian was erected on Wyomissing avenue in 1897, and is one of the most modern and substantial residences of the section. Mr. and Mrs. Killian are very popular in their community, where they have a wide social circle.


KILLIAN, MONROE C.

p. 1149

Surnames: KILLIAN, COLDREN, LESSLEY, STEFFEY, WINEHOLD, SPATZ, SNADER

Monroe C. Killian, a well-known resident of Mohnton, where he is employed in the Wyomissing Hosiery factory, was born in Muddy Creek, Lancaster county, Sept. 8, 1869, son of Rudolph and Catherine (Coldren) Killian.

Rudolph Killian, Sr., grandfather of Monroe C., was a farmer of Lancaster county, being a large land owner in East End township, where he died. He married Millie Lessley, and their children were: Samuel, Sophia, Henry, Rudolph, Emanuel and Maggie.

Rudolph Killian, son of Rudolph, Sr., and father of Monroe C., was born in Lancaster count, near Terre Hill, and for several years manufactured cigars, also having the stage route between Lancaster and Terre Hill and Reading for eight years, or two terms. He also carried on farming, but is now engaged in a livery and general hauling business, and owns a tract of land at Terre Hill. Mr. Killian married Catherine Coldren, daughter of Peter and Catherine (Steffey) Coldren, and to them were born children as follows: Wayne, of Montgomery, Ill.; Diller, of Brownstown, Pa.; Kinser, deceased; Monroe C.; Mary, m. to Jacob Winehold, resides at Bowmanville, Pa.

Monroe C. Killian spent his school days in Lancaster county, and learned the cigar making trade with his father, which he followed for two years, then driving an express train at Terre Hill, during this time attending school in the winter months. At the age of sixteen years, he began driving a stage between Terre Hill and Lancaster, Pa., and this he followed for seven years ? three years to Lancaster, and four years between Terre Hill and Reading. He then did hauling for three years for his father, and in 1897 came to Mohnton, where he was engaged in J. H. Spatz & Co.'s straw hat factory, remaining there three years. The next two years were spent farming in Spring township, where he purchased land, after which he engaged in a draying business at Mohnton, which he followed for three years. After one year spent in the Spatz planing mill, in 1906 he was employed by the Wyomissing Hosiery mills, where he has continued to the present time as general utility man.

On July 21, 1897, Mr. Killian was united in marriage with Miss Sue E. Spatz, daughter of John H. and Mary (Snader) Spatz, a complete history of this family being found in another part of this volume. To this union there were born these children: M. Phamia and John Randolph. In politics Mr. Killian is an independent voter, casting his ballot for the man he thinks best fitted for the office. He is a member of the Woodmen of America. Mrs. Killian is connected with the Evangelical Association of Mohnton, and is a teacher in the Sunday-school, and for several years was teacher of the infant class.

The pleasant home of Mr. and Mrs. Killian was erected on Wyomissing avenue in 1897, and is one of the most modern and substantial residences of the section. Mr. and Mrs. Killian are very popular in their community, where they have a wide social circle.


KILMER, LEVI A.

p. 1103

Surnames: KILMER, KILLMER, THIESS, LAUER, KATTERMAN, UHRICH, MILLER, KLOPP, HOFFMAN, LEISS, FILBERT, LAUCKS, WALBORN, BATDORF, SELZER, GERHART, WEIGLEY, KINTZEL, PEIFFER, WILHELM, SNYDER, BOLTZ, PHILIPS, SCHOENER, WESTLEY

Levi A. Kilmer. Among the prominent citizens Marion township, Berks county, is Levi A. Kilmer, who is now living retired after many years spent in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Kilmer was born Nov. 4, 1851, on the historic Swatara creek in Marion township, Berks county, and is a member of one of this section's oldest and most honored families.

Nicholas Killmer, the progenitor of this well-known family, came to the Tulpehocken Valley, in Berks county, prior to the Revolutionary war, at which time he was in very humble circumstances, all of his worldly belongings being tied up in a handkerchief. A German by descent, he was honest and industrious, and worked so conscientiously at his trade of tailor that he made many friends, among them a Christian Lauer, one of the pioneers of the Tulpehocken Valley, who interested himself in young Kilmer's behalf. Feeling that the young man would prove himself of the right caliber if rightly encouraged, Mr. Lauer introduced him to Miss Elizabeth Thiess (a member of the wealthy Thiess family), and his belief was justified, Mr. Killmer becoming one of the prominent and substantial men of the county. His will, made Aug. 6, 1808, is one record in Will Book D, page 108, and states that "each son shall receive 400 pounds and each daughter 300 pounds from the heap" soon after his demise. After making ample provision for his beloved wife, the residue of his estate was equally distributed among his seven children. The executors of this document were his son Nicholas and his trusty friend, Philip Thiess, of Lebanon township, Dauphin county. Mr. Killmer was assessed in Tulpehocken township in 1779 with 200 acres of land, three horses and five cattle, paying two pounds, six shillings, and on June 21, 1785, he obtained by warrant 250 acres in Tulpehocken township from the proprietors of the Province of Pennsylvania. The children of Nicholas and Elizabeth (Thiess) Killmer were: Jonathan; Barbara, m. to Benjamin Lauer; Magdalena, m. to Andrew Katterman; Elizabeth, m. to Valentine Uhrich; Eve, m. to Michael Uhrich; David; and Nicholas.

Nicholas Killmer, son of the progenitor, was a man of more than ordinary intelligence, and was one of the prominent residents of Marion township, where he resided on a farm of 150 acres, now the property of Amandon M. Miller. He also owned the farms now operated by Isaac P. Klopp and the Isaac Hoffman estate, and two farms along the Swatara Creek. He is buried at the Trinity (Tulpehocken) Reformed Church. Mr. Killmer was married to Catharine Leiss, who was born June 11, 1777, and died Nov. 16, 1850, aged seventy-three years, five months, five days, daughter of Christopher Leiss. To this union were born children as follows: Isaac N. 1800-1875; John W., 1811-1881, m. Catherine Leiss,1808-1878, and they had a son, Edwin L., 1831-1900 (m. Rebecca E. Filbert); Thomas W., 1811-1865, m. in 1831, Maria Leiss, 1810-1887, and they had one son, Isaac L., 1843-1867; David W., 1818-1896, m. Elenora Westley, 1824-1884; and Maria m. a Laucks.

Isaac Nicholas Kilmer, grandfather of Levi A., and grandson of the progenitor, was born Sept. 11, 1800, and died July 20, 1875, when in his seventy-fifth year of age. Mr. Kilmer was an extensive dealer in land, and became a large property owner, and at the time of his death resided on the farm on which Isaac N. Kilmer, his grandson, now lives. He also engaged in conveyancing, and wrote many wills and deeds, and drew up mortgages and agreements. His long life was one of usefulness to his township, and he was known as one of the community's best citizens. He was buried in the cemetery of Trinity Reformed Church, in the Kilmer family plot. Mr. Kilmer was married to Mary Walborn, born March 3, 1804, died Nov. 3, 1864, aged sixty years, eight months, daughter of John and Elizabeth Walborn, and their children were: Israel; Amos, who died unmarried at the age of twenty-one years; and Rebecca, who died while a student at school, she and her brother Amos being buried in one grave at the Mount Aetna Church.

Israel Kilmer, father of Levi A., was born at the Swatara creek, Nov. 5, 1825, and died Feb. 16, 1904, in his seventy-ninth year. He was engaged all of his life in agricultural pursuits, and during his career became one of the largest property owners of this section of the county, having three farms in Marion township. He also owned three valuable properties in Jackson township, Lebanon county, and at one time made a present of $10,000 to each of his six children. He was an excellent business man, but never allowed his many interests to interfere with his settled ideas of right and justice, and he was a leading member of Trinity Reformed Church, of which he was a deacon and elder for many years. He hauled stones for the erection of the present church edifice, where he was buried in the family lot. Israel Kilmer married Lovina Batdorf, daughter of Michael and Barbara (Selzer) Batdorf, who now lives with her daughter, Mrs. Darius Gerhart. Mr. and Mrs. Kilmer had nine children: Emma m. Jonathan Weigley, now deceased and has one daughter, Lizzie R.; Maria m. John Weigley, and has seven children, Mary, Ira, Harry, Dawson, Robert, Ray and Katie; Levi A.; Rebecca m. Darius Gerhart, of Jackson township, Lebanon county, and has two children, Annie and Paul; Martha m. Franklin Kintzel, and has two children, Mary and Warren; Isaac N.; and Aaron and twins died in infancy.

Levi A. Kilmer was reared to agricultural pursuits, and worked for his parents until reaching his majority, at which time he engaged in tenant farming for four years, when he was given a farm of ninety-six acres by his grandfather Isaac N. Kilmer. He cultivated this fertile tract for eighteen years, and in 1893 purchased the old Samuel Peiffer estate of fifty-one acres, on which he now lives retired. Mr. Kilmer was a successful agriculturist, and during his years of active farming erected the summer house, wagon shed, pig sty and other buildings on his farm, in addition to making many other improvements.

Mr. Kilmer is a Democrat in politics, and he has been one of his party's leaders in Marion township, where he has served for six years as school director, being secretary of the board, has been a delegate to a number of county conventions, and is at present a supervisor, the first under the new road law. He is a member of the Ancient Order of Good Fellows No. 42 of Stouchsburg, of which he is a past grand. Mr. Kilmer and his family are consistent member of Trinity Reformed Church of Tulpehocken, where he has served as trustee since 1899, and he is also secretary of the board and secretary and treasurer of the cemetery committee.

In 1872 Mr. Kilmer married Lizzie R. Wilhelm, daughter of William and Lementia (Snyder) Wilhelm, and granddaughter of Jacob and Barbara (Boltz) Wilhelm. To Mr. And Mrs. Kilmer two children have been born: Harry W., who is serving as a roadmaster of Marion township, married Annie Philips, who died without issue; and Mary L. H. m. John W. Schoener (son of Tyrus Schoener), a well-known educator and farmer of Marion township, and they have one son, Homer Kilmer.


KINDT, CHARLES D. B.

p. 1167

Surnames: KINDT, SEIDEL, REDCAY, HEFT, BAINS, FRANCIS, SALLENBERGER, LESHER, GEIGLY, PENNYPACKER, LUDWIG, MOHN, MATZ, FRITZ, WEITZEL, GRUBER, BICKEL, WHITE, WESTLEY, FREESE, SCHUPP, BITTLER, KNORR, RUTH, WEAVER

Charles D. B. Kindt, a highly esteemed citizen of Mohnton, Pa., engaged in funeral directing, embalming and undertaking, was born Aug. 5, 1877, in Cumru township, Berks county, son of Daniel M. Kindt.

John Kindt, great-grandfather of Charles D. B., came from Maiden-creek township and located near Muddy Creek Church in Lancaster county, where he owned a fine farm of 200 acres, being a man of considerable means, worth about $50,000. He was a leading citizen and a man of considerable influence, and was an excellent mechanic, doing all of his own carpentering, blacksmithing and weaving. He married Sarah Seidel, daughter of Heinrich Seidel, and to them were born children as follows: John; Joel, who was a forty-niner; Simon, of Lancaster county, m. Mary Redcay; Nicholas, a drover living on the old stand, m. Katie Heft; Solomon, a hatter by trade, and later the proprietor of the "St. Cloud Hotel," Reading, Pa., m. (first) Lucy Bains and (second) Ellen Francis; Adam, a soldier in the Civil war, now living in Chicago, married a lady from that city; Rachel m. Samuel Sallenberger; Sally m. Solomon Lesher; Betsy m. William Geigly; Kate m. Benjamin Pennypacker; and Esther m. Peter Ludwig.

John Kindt, grandfather of Charles D. B., was born in Maiden-creek township. He was a farmer, owning a tract of seventy-five acres near Vinemont, in Spring township. During the Civil war, he was a private in Company E., 167th P. V. I. John Kindt married Mary Mohn, daughter of Daniel Mohn, and to them were born these children: Daniel M.; Sarah m. (first) Elijah Matz, and (second) Frank Fritz; Henry, living on the old homestead at Vinemont, m. Mary Weitzel; John died in childhood; and Mary is an invalid.

Daniel M. Kindt, father of Charles D. B., was born March 27, 1845, in Spring township, and is a retired hatter and laborer of Mohnton. He was reared on his fathers farm, and attended pay school for a time. He was twice married, (first) Dec. 27, 1867, to Elmira Bickel, daughter of Daniel and Rebecca (Gruber) Bickel, by whom he had two children: Belle m. James White, deceased; and Charles D. B. His second marriage was July 19, 1880, to Mary Westley, daughter of John and Mary (Freese) Westley, and to this union were born three children: Howard m. Cora Schupp; Jacob and Mamie.

Charles D. B. Kindt secured his education in the public schools of Mohnton, and from boyhood has practically taken care of himself. He first carried papers, and then learned the cigar making trade with the firm of R. S. Bittler, and this he followed for four years, at the end of that time turning his attention to cabinet making, and under C. S. Knorr, at Mohnton, he became an expert cabinet maker. While with Mr. Knorr he also learned the undertaking business, and after three years experience decided to enter into business for himself. His beginning was in a humble way, he at first utilizing an old stable, 14 x 15 feet, but later was able to erect several model buildings, well-equipped for the carrying on of his business. On Feb. 1, 1901, he took a course in the Massachusetts School of Embalming, where he was graduated. He is now located at Mohnton, opposite the Mosser & Westley store, where his building is equipped with all the latest improved methods demanded in these modern times. In 1904 he purchased a fine rubber tired hearse, and in January, 1907, he provided himself with a first-class embalming carriage, and he now commands the bulk of the business over a large area.

On April 23, 1903, Mr. Kindt was married to Mary A. Ruth, daughter of Henry K. and Elizabeth (Weaver) Ruth, and they have two children: Sibella Ruth and Charles Daniel, Jr. With his family Mr. Kindt belongs to St. Johns Lutheran Church, of which his accomplished wife is the organist. On Nov. 19, 1899, Mr. Kindt was elected superintendent of the Sunday-school, which under his direction has increased in numbers and efficiency. The family reside in a beautiful home on Church street, which Mr. Kindt purchased in 1902, and subsequently improved. Fraternally Mr. Kindt is a member of Camp No. 211, P. O. S. of A.; the K. G. E.; Lodge No. 186, Jr. O. U. A. M.; and Tent No. 245, Knights of the Maccabees.


KING, WILLIAM D.

p. 1677

Surnames: KING, ARTHUR, HINTON, STRENG, GUINTHER, FREY

William D. King, proprietor of the King Machine Works, at Reading, Pa., and an inventor of faucets, was born March 22, 1851, in Coatesville, Chester county, son of Isaac King.

Isaac King, who was a native of Dover, Del., for many years was an iron roller, and also engaged as a teamster, driving a six-mule team for several years. In 1861 he came to Reading, and engaged at the Philadelphia & Reading shops, under Colonel Arthur, being there employed at the time of his death April 15, 1899, in his seventy-eighth year. He married Rebecca S. Hinton, a native of Pennsylvania, who died from smallpox, Aug. 9, 1872, at the age of fifty-five years. To this union were born eight children, three of whom survive: William D.; Anna M. R.; and Margaret A. The family were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. King was a Republican in politics, and fraternally belonged to the Knights of the Mystic Chain.

William D. King was educated in the schools of Chester county and of Reading, attending the latter about one and one-half years, after which he spent one year at the rolling mill of the Reading Iron Works. In 1867 he engaged with Douglass & Connard, with whom he remained until 1902, and in this year he engaged in his present business, operating it, however, until 1903 for the firm of Rick & Jones. In the latter year he took up the business on his own account, having at first two partners, but in 1906 he bought out their interest. He employs from six to eight skilled mechanics, and his principal work is the manufacturing of expansion joints for steam pipes. He also repairs steam pumps and engines, and makes a specialty of steam fitting. The shop is located at Nos. 511-513 North Third street. In political matters Mr. King is a Republican, and his fraternal connection is with Camp No. 89, P. O. S. of A., of Reading, which he joined in 1871.

Mr. King was married to Minnie Streng, an adopted daughter of Martin Streng, and they have become the parents of three children: Irene R., m. to Ambrose Guinther, a contractor; Amy C., and William R.

William R. King, son of William D., was born Sept. 17, 1887, and is in the employ of his father. On Oct. 28, 1907, he married Anna Mary Frey, and their children are Thelma Larne and an infant yet unnamed. They reside at No. 1026 Madison avenue.


KING, WILLIAM D.

p. 1677

Surnames: KING, ARTHUR, HINTON, STRENG, GUINTHER, FREY

William D. King, proprietor of the King Machine Works, at Reading, Pa., and an inventor of faucets, was born March 22, 1851, in Coatesville, Chester county, son of Isaac King.

Isaac King, who was a native of Dover, Del., for many years was an iron roller, and also engaged as a teamster, driving a six-mule team for several years. In 1861 he came to Reading, and engaged at the Philadelphia & Reading shops, under Colonel Arthur, being there employed at the time of his death April 15, 1899, in his seventy-eighth year. He married Rebecca S. Hinton, a native of Pennsylvania, who died from smallpox, Aug. 9, 1872, at the age of fifty-five years. To this union were born eight children, three of whom survive: William D.; Anna M. R.; and Margaret A. The family were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. King was a Republican in politics, and fraternally belonged to the Knights of the Mystic Chain.

William D. King was educated in the schools of Chester county and of Reading, attending the latter about one and one-half years, after which he spent one year at the rolling mill of the Reading Iron Works. In 1867 he engaged with Douglass & Connard, with whom he remained until 1902, and in this year he engaged in his present business, operating it, however, until 1903 for the firm of Rick & Jones. In the latter year he took up the business on his own account, having at first two partners, but in 1906 he bought out their interest. He employs from six to eight skilled mechanics, and his principal work is the manufacturing of expansion joints for steam pipes. He also repairs steam pumps and engines, and makes a specialty of steam fitting. The shop is located at Nos. 511-513 North Third street. In political matters Mr. King is a Republican, and his fraternal connection is with Camp No. 89, P. O. S. of A., of Reading, which he joined in 1871.

Mr. King was married to Minnie Streng, an adopted daughter of Martin Streng, and they have become the parents of three children: Irene R., m. to Ambrose Guinther, a contractor; Amy C., and William R.

William R. King, son of William D., was born Sept. 17, 1887, and is in the employ of his father. On Oct. 28, 1907, he married Anna Mary Frey, and their children are Thelma Larne and an infant yet unnamed. They reside at No. 1026 Madison avenue.

Last Modified Thursday, 16-Oct-2008 20:54:52 EDT

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