Biographies from Historical and Biographical Annals by Morton Montgomery

KERSHNER, A.M.

p. 1372

Surnames: KERSHNER, FAUST, BROBST, FAHRENBACH, SCHMUCK, PAYNE, WENRICH

A. M. Kershner, of Reading, who is engaged in the manufacture of ice cream and water ices at Nos. 15, 17, 19, 21, 23 North Third street, was born May 3, 1856, in Bernville, Pa., son of William B. and Henrietta (Faust) Kershner.

As a boy Mr. Kershner started to work as officeboy for Dr. Brobst of Bernville, receiving as compensation his board and schooling. He remained with the Doctor for three years, and then started to work as a farm laborer, and for some time was engaged in various employments, including teaching school in Centre township for one session. Mr. Kershner then apprenticed himself to the shoemaker's trade, which he followed successfully for a period of nineteen years, and in 1892 was appointed to the position of deputy under Sheriff Fahrenbach. He located in Reading, and served in the position throughout the administration, giving universal satisfaction. He continued in that capacity under Sheriff Schmuck, then taking a position in his brother's hotel, remaining with him until the latter's retirement, when he took a like position with Al. Payne at the Windsor Hotel. He was then appointed deputy sheriff during Frank Brobst's administration, serving in that office for eighteen months, when he was appointed clerk in the prothonotary's office under Daniel Schmuck. For one year after having that position, Mr. Kershner lived practically retired, but on July 28, 1902, he purchased the stock and fixtures of the Sherman Ice Cream Co., 19-23 North Third street. Since taking possession of the business Mr. Kershner has increased the capacity of the plant sixty per cent. He has built a brick store room and factory, and has a seating capacity of 250 people, this, however, being inadequate during busy seasons. He caters to Reading's best families, making a specialty of weddings, festivals, etc., and the Kershner trademark is well know as a guarantee of pure goods. Mr. Kershner himself is affable and courteous, genial and obliging, and none have ever left his place dissatisfied. He hires a corps of twenty assistants, and three delivery teams are used by him in the business, orders being promptly attended to. Mr. Kershner deserves the success that has come to him. Starting out in life entirely upon his own resources, he has worked his way to the front, and may now be considered one of Reading's substantial citizens.

Mr. Kershner was married in 1875 to Rebecca Wenrich, and they have three children: Estelle L., Anna H., and John W., all at home. In religious belief the family are Lutherans. Politically he votes for the man, not the party. Mr. Kershner is fraternally identified with Bernville Lodge, No. 122, I. O. O. F., P. O. S. of A., Camp No. 113, of Bernville, Wyomissing Council of the Royal Arcanum, Foresters of America, Reading, and Lexington Commandery, P. O. S. of A.


KERSHNER, EDWIN

p., 1118

Surnames: KERSHNER, FAUST, BODEY, AMMON

Edwin Kershner, a member of the firm of Ammon Kershner, proprietors of the American House Reading, Pa. (One of the best known hotels in the State), was born Aug. 19, 1873, at Bernville. Berks County, son of Henry J. and Sarah A. (Faust) Kershner.

The heads of the Kershner families in Berks county emigrated from Amsterdam, and arrived at New York during the winter of 1722-23. In 1759 Conrad Kershner's name appears as a land owner in Bern township. One of his sons was Philip. One of Philip's Sons, Peter Kershner, was a farmer in Bern township all his life, and died in that portion now within the limits of Penn township, the farm upon which he lived and which he owned being still in the possession of the family. Peter Kershner married a Miss Bodey, and ten children were born to them, five sons and five daughters. The sons were: Peter, Henry J.. Lewis, George and James. Peter Kershner, the grandfather of Edwin, was a Democrat in politics, and wielded considerable influence in his community, having held a number of local offices.

Henry J. Kershner, second son of Peter Kershner above mentioned, and father of Edwin, was for many years a cattle dealer and farmer in Berks county, but retired in 1899. He and his wife had twelve children, ten of whom are now living: George. Edwin, Palmer, Louis, Jared, Charles, Sarah H., Katie L., Walter W. and Warren W., twins; the two who died in infancy were Franklin and William.

Mr. Edwin Kershner married Fannie A., daughter of George M. Ammon, the former proprietor of the "American House." They have one child, George Ammon Kershner, born Oct. 26, 1907.


KERSHNER, JAMES P.

p. 699

Surnames: KERSHNER, BODEY, HIMMELSBERGER, DAVIS, HAIN, KOENIG, HIESTER, REBER, BOHN, ROTHERMEL, SPANGLER, WENRICH, OREGAN

James P. Kershner, now living retired at No. 121 North Front street, was for many years a well-known public official of Reading. He was born Jan. 25, 1845, in Penn township, Berks county, son of Peter and Catherine (Bodey) Kershner, and grandson of Philip Kershner.

The Kershner family was founded in this country by Martin Kershner, who settled on a farm in Berks county in 1732, this farm being later the property of his son, Peter, who in turn willed it to his son, Philip. Philip Kershner married a Miss Himmelsberger, and to them was born one son, Peter, who became the father of James P. Kershner.

Peter Kershner, who was a prominent man of his day, engaged in agricultural pursuits all of his life on the farm above mentioned, and died in Penn township, Jan. 28, 1868, aged sixth-four years. His wife, Catherine Bodey, died in 1876, when seventy-five years old. They had a family of fourteen children, twelve of whom grew to maturity: Priscilla m. Cyrus Davis; Mary m. Franklin G. Hain; Eliza died in infancy, as did also Alfred; Catherine m. Abraham R. Koenig; Sarah m. Richard Reber; Peter; Rosabella married Harrison K. Hiester; Sidney m. John R. Koenig; Susan m. Richard K. Bohn; Henry J.; Louis P.; George W.; and James P. In religious belief the family were Reformed, and were attendants of Bern Reformed Church. In politics Mr. Kershner was a Democrat and was director of the poor for some years, being appointed to that position first by the court of complete an unexpired term, and later was elected to the office by the people.

James P. Kershner received his education in the schools of Penn township, and worked on the farm until twenty-four years of age. At this time he learned the butcher's trade, which he followed for twelve years, being then appointed county detective by I. H. Rothermel. He served three years in this office, and was then appointed mercantile appraiser, in which capacity he continued on year. For two years he served as law detective, to which office he had been appointed by the courts of Berks county, and a like period was spent in the office of deputy sheriff. He was for one term of three years keeper of the Berks county prison, and was again, appointed county detective, under A. H. Rothermel, serving three years, and at the end of this time retired. He was always an honest, capable officer, and none has retired with a cleaner record than he.

Mr. Kershner married, in 1868, Melinda Spangler, who died in 1860, leaving one child, Mary, who died in infancy. Mr. Kershner's second marriage was in 1870, to Priscilla H. Wenrich, daughter of Daniel H. Wenrich, three children being born to this union; Thomas, who died aged ten years; Sallie, who died when three years old; and Ellen, m. to Edward W. O'Regan, by whom she has had two children, Stella (deceased) and Marion. Mr. Kershner is a member of Oley Lodge No. 218, I. O. O. F. He has from his early youth been identified with the Democratic party, and has ever been active in the ranks of that organization in this section. Mr. Kershner is a good, useful citizen, and is highly esteemed throughout the community.


KERSHNER, LEWIS PHILIP

p 867

Surnames: KERSHNER, BODY, STOUDT, DAVIS, HAIN, KOENIG, REBER, HIESTER, GEISS, FAUST, SHOMS, SPANGLER, WENRICH, MIESSE, MOYER, REED, LICHTY

Lewis Philip Kershner, one of Bernville's most highly esteemed citizens, who is now living retired, and a veteran of the great Civil war, was born Aug. 6. 1841, in Penn township. Berks county, Pa., son of Peter and Catherine (Body) Kershner.

Peter Kershner, great-grandfather of Lewis P., was born in 1747, and he became the owner of 375 acres of land in Penn township, where he lived. He was a prominent man in Berks county, being county commissioner from 1794 to 1797. His death occurred on his farm, in 1809, and he is buried at Bern Reformed Church, of which he was a consistent member. His sons, Philip and John, received each a half of his land.

Philip Kershner, son of Peter, was bore on the homestead in 1767, and he died in 1830 at Bern Church, in the vicinity of which he had spent his life in farming. He was twice married, his wives being sisters, and his only child, who was born to the first marriage, was Peter.

Peter Kershner, father of Lewis P., was born in April, 1803, on the old homestead place, and lived thereon all of his life, his death occurring in 1868, when he was buried at Bern Church. He served as treasurer of Penn township for many years. and from 1848 to 1853 was director of the poor. Mr. Kershner married Catherine Body, daughter of Henry and Christine (Stoudt) Body, and they had these children: Priscilla married Cyrus Davis; Mary m. Frank G. Hain; Catherine m. Abraham R. Koenig; Sydney m. John R. Koenig; Sarah m. Richard . Reber; Rosebella m. Harrison K. Hiester; Susan died unmarried; Peter B. m. Mary Geiss, and had children, Mary, Laura, Ellen, John, Monroe, Thomas and Peter; Henry J. m. Sarah Faust, and had children, George, Edward, Palmer, Lewis. Jeremiah, Charles, Kate, Sarah, Walter and Warren; Lewis Philip; George W. m. Ellen Shoms, and has one daughter; James P. m. (first) Malinda Spangler, and (second) Priscilla Wenrich; Alfred and Eliza died in infancy.

Lewis P. Kershner remained on the home farm until October. 1862, when he enlisted, becoming a corporal of Co. G, 151st P. V. I., and served nine, months, participating in the battles of Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg and Gettysburg. At the latter he was taken prisoner and held at West Chester, Pa., in the parole camp. He was mustered out of the service July 28, 1863, and returned to Bernville. He had secured a good education in the public schools as well as the pay school, and had learned the butchering trade, which he now took up and followed until 1867, at which time he began operating the old homestead, but after some years came to Bernville, where he has since lived retired. In addition to the old homestead which consists of 144 acres, Mrs. Kershner owns a farm of 109 acres. Mr. Kershner is a Democrat in politics and he has served as burgess three times, as councilman three sessions, school director six years and has been treasurer of the Jacob Haag cemetery board since 1897 He belongs to the Reformed Church, and is a comrade of G. A. R. Post, No. 16.

On Aug. 25, 1869, Mr. Kershner was married to Mary A. Miesse, daughter of Rev. Isaac and Ann (Moyer) Miesse, and to this union there were born five children as follows: Dr. P. J. is a cattle and meat inspector of Topeka; Kansas; Harry C. lives at Bernville; Lizzie J. m John C. Reed of Steelton, Pa., and has three children James E., William K. and Philip T.; and Ann M. and Walter both died in infancy.

Jacob Miesse, grandfather of Mrs. Kershner, was born in Centre township, and there he spent his entire life, being a prominent man and for several years a justice of the peace. His children were: Dr. Gabriel; Dr. Jonathan was a writer of some prominence; Rev. Samuel was Methodist minister; Rev. Isaac; Dr. Jacob was a dentist and also carried on farming operations; and Catherine married Andrew Lichty.

Rev. Isaac Miesse was born March 31, 1812. in Centre township. Berks Co., Pa., and was licensed by the so-called "Free Synod," coming with that body into the old or Mother Church in 1836. He had charge of several congregations in Berks county-Bern, Bellemans, Frieden Rehrersburg and Blue Mountain--and lived in Reading until 1850, when he went to Penn township. He was connected with the Synod until 1863, at which time he declared himself independent, and so continued until his death Feb. 1. 1864. at the age of fifty-one years, ten months, one day being buried at Bern Church. Rev. M Miesse married Annie Moyer, daughter of Jacob and Christine (Stoudt) Mover, of Penn township, Berks county, and to this union there was born but one child, a daughter, Mrs. Kershner.


KERST, HENRY AUGUSTUS

p. 1577

Surnames: KERST, KIRSTEN, RITTER, GERICH, LEVAN, KLOHS, SNYDER, BUSHONG, EPLER, FENTON

Henry Augustus Kerst, one of the best known men in his line in the city of Philadelphia, Pa., where he has been conducting a commission business for nearly half a century, was born Dec. 17, 1836, in Alsace (now Muhlenberg) township, Berks county, a short distance beyond the city line of Reading, on his father's farm along the Centre turnpike.

John Kerst (Kirsten), the great-great-grandfather of Henry A., was born in the Palatinate in 1700, emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1720, and settled in Oley, where he married Eva Rosina Ritter in 1727. They had an only-child, John Henry. The latter, who made his home in Oley, was married to Albania Gerich, and they had nine children: Susanna, Julianna, John, Henry, Anna, Maria, Eva Rosina, Hannah and Samuel. The last named, the grandfather of Henry A. Kerst, married Elizabeth Levan, by whom he had nine children, as follows: Henry, Jacob, Benjamin, Solomon, Samuel, Maria, and three who died young.

Jacob Kerst, the father of Henry A., was a farmer of Alsace township, where he was married to Elizabeth Klohs, a daughter of Jacob Klohs, also a farmer of Alsace. Mr. And Mrs. Kerst had four children, namely: Amos (m. Catherine Snyder); Magdalena (m. George W. Bushong); Henry Augustus, and a son who died young.

Henry Augustus Kerst was educated in the school in the vicinity of his home, and in Philadelphia. Until twenty years of age assisted his father on the farm. At this time he went to Philadelphia, where he found employment in a "camphor-still," and remained there three years, where he started in business for himself in the sale of produce and poultry, and this he has been conducting to the present time, having been located in the market house at Twelfth and Market streets continuously since 1867.

Mr. Kerst was married in 1861 to Angeline Epler, a daughter of Daniel Epler, of Cumru township, who was brought up near Gouglersville and moved to Philadelphia in 1848. Eight children have been born to Mr. And Mrs. Kerst: Daniel; Henry; William; Morris; Laura (m. M. J. Fenton); Elizabeth (m. Walter D. Epler); Ella; and Lillie, who died young.


KERST, SAMUEL W.

p. 1338

Surnames: KERST, WICKLEIN, BERTOLET, MOORE, KINSEY, WEIDENSOHL, RHOADS, CRING, BROOKE

Samuel W. Kerst, a retired boatman and honored veteran of the Civil war, who now makes his home at Gibraltar, Robeson township, was born in 1838, in Union township, Berks county, son of Samuel B. and Elizabeth (Wicklein) Kerst.

Jacob Kerst, the grandfather of Samuel W., was a son of George Kerst, an extensive land owner of Union township and one of the heaviest tax payers of that section. Jacob Kerst, like his father, was an extensive farmer and land owner, inheriting much of his father's property, and at his death, when aged fifty-two, was a very prosperous man. His wife, Esther Bertolet, died in 1847, at the age of seventy- seven years, in the faith of the Lutheran Church, to which her husband also belonged. He was an Old Line Whig in politics. Jacob Kerst and wife had these children: Mary m. Elias Moore; Catherine m. Daniel Kinsey; Esther m. George Kinsey; Samuel B.; Daniel m. Catherine Weidensohl; and Isaac went to New York State, where he married, the name of his wife not being known.

Samuel B. Kerst was born in Union township, Berks county, and there spent all of his life in agricultural pursuits, dying in 1879, at the age of eighty-three years. His wife passed away in 1856, when fifty-four years old, and their children were: Jacob m. Hannah Wicklein; Isaac died unmarried at the age of twenty-three years; Abram m. (first) Harriet Rhoads, and (second) Caroline Cring; Samuel W.; Esther died at the age of eighteen years; and Lydia , Mary and Daniel died in infancy. In religious beliefs the family are connected with the Lutheran Church. Politically Mr. Kerst was first a Whig and later a Republican.

Samuel W. Kerst was educated in the common schools of Union township, after which he engaged in boating on the canal. Some time afterwards he became master of a boat, and with the exception of about four years spent in teaching, continued at that occupation until 1893, when he built his fine home in Gibraltar, and since that time has lived practically retired. October 1, 1861, Mr. Kerst enlisted in Co. B. 53rd Reg. P. V. I., Col. John R. Brooke, to serve three years, and received his honorable discharge at the expiration of that time, having received a wound at the battle of Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864, and having been in the hospital six months on account of sickness. He had the record of a brave and faithful soldier, who always performed his duties cheerfully and well.

Mr. Kerst was united in marriage with Miss Leah Wicklein, daughter of William Wicklein. He is a member of Keim Post No. 76, G. A. R. For three years he has been a deacon in St. John's Lutheran Church, and for several years superintendent of the Sunday school. He is a Republican in politics, and for two terms served as a school director in Robeson township.

As a boy Mr. Kershner started to work as officeboy for Dr. Brobst of Bernville, receiving as compensation his board and schooling. He remained with the Doctor for three years, and then started to work as a farm laborer, and for some time was engaged in various employments, including teaching school in Centre township for one session. Mr. Kershner then apprenticed himself to the shoemaker's trade, which he followed successfully for a period of nineteen years, and in 1892 was appointed to the position of deputy under Sheriff Fahrenbach. He located in Reading, and served in the position throughout the administration, giving universal satisfaction. He continued in that capacity under Sheriff Schmuck, then taking a position in his brother's hotel, remaining with him until the latter's retirement, when he took a like position with Al. Payne at the Windsor Hotel. He was then appointed deputy sheriff during Frank Brobst's administration, serving in that office for eighteen months, when he was appointed clerk in the prothonotary's office under Daniel Schmuck. For one year after having that position, Mr. Kershner lived practically retired, but on July 28, 1902, he purchased the stock and fixtures of the Sherman Ice Cream Co., 19-23 North Third street. Since taking possession of the business Mr. Kershner has increased the capacity of the plant sixty per cent. He has built a brick store room and factory, and has a seating capacity of 250 people, this, however, being inadequate during busy seasons. He caters to Reading's best families, making a specialty of weddings, festivals, etc., and the Kershner trademark is well know as a guarantee of pure goods. Mr. Kershner himself is affable and courteous, genial and obliging, and none have ever left his place dissatisfied. He hires a corps of twenty assistants, and three delivery teams are used by him in the business, orders being promptly attended to. Mr. Kershner deserves the success that has come to him. Starting out in life entirely upon his own resources, he has worked his way to the front, and may now be considered one of Reading's substantial citizens.

Mr. Kershner was married in 1875 to Rebecca Wenrich, and they have three children: Estelle L., Anna H., and John W., all at home. In religious belief the family are Lutherans. Politically he votes for the man, not the party. Mr. Kershner is fraternally identified with Bernville Lodge, No. 122, I. O. O. F., P. O. S. of A., Camp No. 113, of Bernville, Wyomissing Council of the Royal Arcanum, Foresters of America, Reading, and Lexington Commandery, P. O. S. of A.


KESSLER FAMILY

p. 811

Surnames: KESSLER, ADDAMS, RITTER, VAN REED, NOLL, REDCAY

The Kessler Family is an old and honored one in Berks county, and its present representative is Miss Mary Catherine Kessler, the only surviving child of William Addams Kessler, deceased, of Lower Heidelberg township, near the Cacoosing creek. She was born on the homestead March 3, 1864.

The Hon. Charles Kessler, of Reading, her grandfather, was born in that city in 1805. He was a man of great prominence for fifty years, in the political and social affairs of the county, as well as in the printing business. When a youth, he entered the printing office of the Reading Adler, which was then published by his father, Charles Kessler, and his uncle, the Hon. John Ritter, and after learning the business worked in the establishment until he was of age. He then became the translator and associate editor for the paper, and under his influence and popularity the circulation of the sheet was largely increased. In 1852, he purchased a half interest in the paper and shortly after ward became the sole proprietor, and continued its publication until 1864. In 1866, he was elected associate judge of the courts of Berks county, and served this office in a most faithful and acceptable manner until 1871, dying from a stroke of apoplexy about the end of his term. Judge Kessler was a man of high attainments. He was especially advanced in the study of entomology, having by his patient researches made a valuable collection of insects. He took great interest in the Berks County Agricultural Society, and served as president for a number of years. In 1857, he purchased a farm in Lower Heidelberg township along the Bernville road, near the Cacoosing creek, and his son then removed from Reading to carry on the farming operations. He devoted much attention to the cultivation of peaches, apples, pears and grapes, which were introduced into the county through his personal efforts. He was married to Elizabeth Addams, daughter of Isaac Addams, and had two children: William A. and Catherine, who married Wellington Van Reed. Mrs. Kessler died in 1867.

William Addams Kessler, father of Mary Catherine, was born at Reading in 1832, and after his preliminary education at that place, he attended for several years a private school at West Chester under the control of the Quakers. Upon his return to Reading , he learned the trade of cabinet-maker, but not liking this employment he entered the printing establishment of his father, who was then conducting the Reading Adler. He acted as clerk in the book store for a time, and then became foreman in the press room, a position which he held until 1837, at which time he moved to the farm in Lower Heidelberg township. During this time, while at Reading, he served as secretary of the Reading Water Company for a number of years. He was an adherent of the Democratic party, and became very popular with the leaders, although never accepting any of the offices frequently tendered to him on account of his services to the party. Though living in the country, he kept up his interests in politics until his decease, covering a period of fifty years. In 1860 Mr. Kessler married Sarah A. Noll, daughter of Daniel H. Noll, of Alsace township, and to this union there were born three children: Elizabeth and Charles, both of whom died in infancy; and Mary Catherine. The mother died in 1904, at the age of sixty-five years, her husband surviving her until 1905, when he passed away, aged seventy-three years.

Mary Catherine Kessler received her early education in the township school, but went to Reading daily for the higher branches. She continued her attendance at Reading until reaching the second class in the high school, but was then obliged to discontinue on account of the serious illness of her mother. She remained at home faithfully and devotedly looking after domestic affairs until the decease of both of her parents. Upon the death of her father she became the sole owner of the property, but shortly afterward she sold the place, with the exception of an acre of ground and the home for herself, to Harry Redcay, who was brought up there by her parents; and here she continues to make her residence. Her home bears the name of "Wilsarkan Gables," a name derived from a combination of the names of the only people who have lived in the home for fifty years-"Wil" from Miss Kessler's father, William, "Sar" from her mother, Sarah, "K" from her own name in the family, Kate, and the "an" from the initials of her uncle Andrew Noll.


KESSLER, JACOB B.

p. 1059

Surnames: KESSLER, SCHOLL, FILANEOUS, KEISER, KEUCHEL, SCHOLL, KEISCHMAN, SHANNAMAN, SCHAUER, TROUT, MILLER, ROLLMAN, HORNBERGER

Jacob C. Kessler, superintendent of Jacob Kessler & Co., hat manufacturers of Mohnton, was born in Cumru township, June 4, 1875, son of Jacob and Christina (Scholl) Kessler, and was the first of his family born on American soil.

Balthaser Kessler, his paternal grandfather, was a native of Rheinpfalz, Bavaria. He was an agriculturist, who owned and cultivated a tract of ten acres. He and his wife, whose maiden name was Mary Filaneous, were the parents of these children: Carl, who crossed the Atlantic eight times; Marguerite, deceased; Catharine, Mrs. Gottlieb Keiser; Jacob; Conrad, now residing in America; and Barbara, wife of Jacob Keuchel, of Germany.

Jacob Kessler was born in the Rheinpfalz, on Sept. 27, 1832. He received the prescribed education of the German schoolboy, and in the year 1854 he entered the army. After serving thirteen weeks he was given a furlough to visit his parents and spent two weeks at home. Instead of returning to the army, he made his way to Havre, France, and on Wednesday, Sept. 17, 1854, embarked for America. He landed at Castle Garden, Nov. 29th of that year, in company with his brother, Conrad, and at once made his way to Reading, in the vicinity of which he has ever since lived. During the first year he worked at whatever came to his hand, but afterward secured a place with Stauffer & Kutz to learn hat-making and he remained there eight years. The following twelve years were spent in the employ of Kutz and Arnold.

In 1875 Mr. Kessler with his brother Conrad, under the firm name of Kessler & Bro., embarked in the manufacturing of wool hats for men, boys and children. At first they met with only the most flattering results, but in the fall of 1879, the entire plant was destroyed by fire, entailing a loss of many thousands. Instead of rebuilding on the same site in Mohnton, the brothers returned to Reading, purchased the hat factory at Eleventh and Spruce streets and established themselves there for several years. Meantime in 1880 Jacob Kessler built his present factory at Mohnton and operated it under the name of Jacob Kessler and Co. The building is 46 x 72 feet, four stories high, and is partly run by water power from the Wyomissing creek. For some years he devoted his attention to this hat factory, but later was again associated with his brother in Reading, after which he once more concentrated his efforts o n the Mohnton enterprise. The firm employs about sixty-five people and finds a ready market for the product all over the country.

On March 23, 1856, was solemnized the marriage of Jacob Kessler and Christina Scholl, a daughter of William Scholl. To this union nine children were born, viz.: Katie died in infancy; Mary m. John Keischman, a hatter of Mohnton; Henry died aged six; George died aged four; Charles m. Miss Elizabeth E. Shannaman, and had three children, William, Katie and Norma, and died when thirty years old; Barbara m. Dr. W. B. Schauer, of Pottstown; Julia m. William Rollman; Christina m. William Trout; and Jacob C. The family are members of St. John's Lutheran Church, of which Mr. Kessler was elder for many years. In politics he is a pronounced Democrat, and has often been sent as a delegate to county conventions.

Jacob C. Kessler studied in the township schools until he had completed the course offered there and then went to the Reading Business College. He was graduated in 1891, and at once entered his father's employ, where he has remained ever since, and now holds the responsible position of superintendent of the factory. In addition to these duties Mr. Kessler has been quite active in politics, working in the Democratic ranks. On June 4, 1904, his twenty-ninth birthday, he received the nomination of his party for the office of director of the poor for Berks county, and in the following fall was elected by a large vote. He still holds the place and has proved himself most efficient in meeting the demands thus made upon him.

On Dec. 23, 1897, Mr. Kessler married Miss Nellie C. Miller, daughter of Samuel K. and Mary (Hornberger) Miller, the former a retired hatter residing in Mohnton. Four sons have been born to this union, Charles N., John J., Carl M. and Warren B. Both Mr. and Mrs. Kessler are members of the St. John Lutheran Church, of Mohnton, of which Mr. Kessler has been secretary since 1890. Their home is a large one, handsomely furnished and surrounded by a beautiful lawn, and is conveniently located at Kesslertown, just above Mohnton, where the factory is situated. Fraternally Mr. Kessler is a member of the K. of P., Knights of the Golden Eagle, and the P. O. S. of A., all of Mohnton, and of Mt. Penn Lodge, I. O. O. F., of Reading.

Last Modified Thursday, 16-Oct-2008 20:54:52 EDT

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