Biographies from Historical and Biographical Annals by Morton Montgomery

GRIM, DANIEL P.

p. 1304

Surnames: GRIM, WEAVER, KEMP, ROTHERMEL, BERTOLET, CROUSE, STETTLER, DIETRICH, BREINIG, SNYDER, FABER, KLINE, KNABB, HOTTENSTEIN, SMECK

Daniel P. Grim, living in retirement at Kutztown, after an active and successful business career of forty years, was born at Grimville, in Greenwich township, Berks county, Aug. 31, 1833. He was educated in the local schools; also at Bethlehem and Strasbourg; and after quitting school, served as a teacher from 1852 to 1855. Then he went to Davenport, Iowa, to engage as a clerk in the general store of Jacob Weaver Jr. & Co., and he remained for two years, when he removed to Kansas City. Shortly afterward, he purchased a large tract of farming land near Topeka, which he continues to hold; also over seven hundred acres in Iowa, which he owned for ten years. In 1857, he returned home at the request of his father to assist as a partner in carrying on the tannery at Grimville. In three years he became the sole owner of the business, and he directed this successfully until 1897. Upon the decease of his father in 1883, he purchased the premises from the estate. He had removed to Kutztown in 1878, and traveled to and fro almost daily until 1897. Since then he has practically lived in retirement. By his father's influence he came to thoroughly appreciate the importance of education, and therefore encouraged the education of children in the upper section of the county in spite of much opposition. He was the first taxpayer there to send his children to a college for the purpose of giving them the advantages of a superior education.

When a national bank was established at Kutztown in 1872, Mr. Grim became one of its directors, and he continued to serve as such until the bank was removed to reading, in 1883; and when interest in a local bank was revived, in 1896, he cooperated earnestly in its organization, and has since then served as a director. Mr. Grim also encouraged an electric plan at Kutztown for light, heat and power, and has filled the office of president of the corporation since 1901.

Picture of Daniel GrimIn December, 1861, Mr. Grim married Catharine A. Grim, daughter of Seth K. Grim and Anna (Kemp), his wife, of Maxatawny township, and by her had five children: Annie C., who was educated at the Keystone State Normal School; A. Elizabeth, who attended the same school, and married Ira P. Rothermel, Esq., an attorney at Reading (whose sketch appears in this publication); Daniel P., Jr., who attended the Keystone State Normal School, Millersville State Normal School and Stoner's Inter-State Business College, and was appointed book-keeper of the Kutztown National Bank in 1902 (which position he is still filling); Emma, who graduated form the Keystone State Normal School, teacher in the local schools for six years, and an artist of superior accomplishments; and Mary, who died in infancy. Mr. Grim and his family have been devoted members of the Lutheran Church. In politics he has been a strong adherent of the Republican party.

Mr. Grim's father was Col. Daniel Bertolet Grim, for sixty years identified with the welfare of Grimville and vicinity, after whom the village had been named and by whom the post-office of the same name had been established in 1830. He was born in the township of Maxatawny July 17, 1800, and was brought up to farming and tanning under his father. He remained at home until twenty-four years of age, and then started in business on his own account, purchasing a farm of over two hundred acres in Greenwich township. There he established a hotel, store, tannery and distillery, and operated them all successfully for many years. He also dealt in cattle, which he purchased in the Western States, brought to his place and disposed of at public sale. In this manner he developed a business stand and market for live stock which came to be well known in Berks county and in the adjoining counties. He showed much interest in the military affairs of the county and officiated as colonel for a number of years. He was a fine-looking man, of commanding presence and influence. He gave great encouragement to education, at the inception of the common school system, notwithstanding local prejudice and opposition. In politics he was a Whig, taking a stand which in his time required great determination and courage in a community almost wholly Democratic. In 1819 he married Elizabeth Crouse, daughter of Charles Abraham Crouse, of Skippackville, Montgomery county, and granddaughter of Cap. Charles Crouse, of Longswamp township in Berks county, who took an active part in the Revolution; and by her he had nine children: Jonathan, Daniel, Charles, Catharine (m. William Stettler), Sarah, Susan (m. Charles Dietrich), Amelia (m. William T. Breinig) and two who died in infancy. He died in 1883, and his wife in 1882.

Jonathan Grim, the grandfather of Daniel P. Grim, was a farmer and tanner of Maxatawny township. He married Catharine Bertolet, daughter of Daniel Bertolet, of Oley, and great-granddaughter of Jean Bertolet, the immigrant from Switzerland in 1726. By her he had an only son, Daniel Bertolet. Upon the decease of this wife he married Elizabeth Snyder, of Oley, by whom he had three children: Jonathan, Joshua, and Mary (m. Charles Faber).

Heinrich Grimm, the great-grandfather, had five sons (including Jonathan) and two daughters; and the great-great-grandfather was Egidius Grim, who emigrated from Germany in 1728, and left two sons, Jacob and Heinrich, and three daughters, Margaret, Catharine, and Elizabeth.

Egidius Grim was accompanied from Wurtemberg, Germany, by his wife, and, on their way to Pennsylvania, they tarried at Deal, England, for several years. By a "Family Tree," prepared many years ago, it appears that he was descended from a Norman knight of the time of William the Conqueror. Upon locating in Pennsylvania, he purchased a large tract of land (upward of seven hundred acres) in the district of Weisenburg, near the Maxatawny settlement, and at the time of his decease, in December, 1761, he was resident of Macungie township, an adjoining district. By his last will, it appears that he gave his large farm to his two sons, Jacob and Henry, in two equal parts, having previously disposed of the premises to them with the reservation of a life estate to live on either of them (his last will being of record in the register's office of Northampton county).

Mr. Daniel P. Grim's wife's father, Seth K. Grim, born in Maxatawny township in 1817, was engaged at farming for a number of years, but he retired at an early age and died in 1887. His wife, Anna Kemp, born in 1814, died in 1883. She was the daughter of Jacob Kemp, farmer of Oley township. They had two children: Catharine A. (m. Daniel P. Grim) and Mary (m. William Kline, of Maxatawny township).

Seth K. Grim's father was David Grim, born 1787, died 1838. He married Catharine Knabb, a daughter of Peter Knabb, of Oley, born 1794, died 1838.

His grandfather was Jacob Grim, born 1754, died 1833; he married Catharine Hottenstein, of Maxatawny township, born 1761, died 1848. His great-grandfather was Henry Grim, the younger son of Egidius Grim, the immigrant in 1728.

Jacob Grim, the grandfather of Seth, was enlisted in the Revolution, having been first lieutenant in the company of Capt. Casper Smeck, Maxatawny township, Second Battalion, of the Berks County Militia, which was called into active service in the summer of 1777, and participated in the battles of Brandywine and Germantown.


GRIM FAMILY

p. 654

Surnames: GRIM, GRIMM, STOEVER, MERKEL, ROTH, HOTTENSTEIN, BUTZ, APPEL, BAILEY, KLINE, HERMAN, GARBER, MILLER, BUNKER, MOSSER, FREDERICK, HARTZELL, SHANKWEILER, TREXLER, KUTZ, DENGLER, GABY, WEISER, BIEBER, KIRBY, KROUSE, RHOADS, BOYER, SEBOLD, BERTOLETT, SNYDER, DIETRICH, BIEBER, ZIMMERMAN, RAUBENHOLD

In Weisenburg township, Northampton (now Lehigh) county, Pa., in 1728 located Johan Egidius Grimm (or Grim), who came to this Commonwealth with that noted pioneer minister of the Lutheran Church, John Casper Stoever. The Grim family home was in Normandy and the lineage is traced back to a Baron there in the time of William the Conquerer. One branch of the family went to Alsace, whence came Johan Egidius (also known as Gitti or Gideon). It appears that he later settled in Maxatawny, Berks county, where he secured a large tract of land. He built a substantial house, where other settlers frequently sought refuge in times of Indian disturbances. Most of his descendants are members of the Lutheran Church, and two of his sons served in the war of the Revolution. The will of "Gitti, alias Gideon," Grim was made Jan. 28, 1760, and was probated Oct. 1, 1761, when Jacob and Henry Grim, his sons, were appointed as executors. In this will he gave his land to his sons Jacob and Henry; fifty pounds to his daughter Cattarina; fifty pounds to his daughter Elizabeth (m. Casper Merkel); thirty pounds to Frantz Roth, "son of my daughter Margreth."

(II) Henry Grim, son of Gitti, married and had three children: Jacob; Jonathan, ancestor of Daniel P. Grim, of Kutztown; Gideon.

(II) Jacob Grim, son of Gitti, married and had a son Henry, born March 16, 1765, who died April 3, 1829, aged seventy-three years, and eighteen days, the father of five children-Rachel, Jonas, Abraham, Solomon and David.

(III) Jacob Grim, son of Henry, was born June 17, 1754. On Nov. 2, 1779, he married Catharina Hottenstein, and he died June 24, 1833, aged seventy-nine years, seven days. Both he and his wife are buried on the farm in Maxatawny township, now owned by Mrs. Cecilia (Grim) Butz, of Allentown. This adjoins the old homestead farm. To Jacob and his wife were born eleven children, namely: Jesse; David; Henry, who died in Philadelphia unmarried; Sem; Daniel, who died in infancy; Nathaniel, who died in infancy; a son that died in infancy unnamed; Sarah, m. to John Bailey; Judith, m. to John Appel; Catharina, who died in infancy; and one whose name is not known.

(IV) Jesse Grim, son of Jacob and Catharina (Hottenstein), had six children: Jacob, father of Mrs. Cecilia Grim Butz, of Allentown; Walter J.; Ephraim; Deborah; William and Allen.

(IV) Sem Grim, son of Jacob and Catharina (Hottenstein), married Anna Kline, and had five children: Dr. Henry; Isabella, m. to the Rev. A. J. Herman; Catharine, m. to Prof. Davis Garber; Louise and Oscar Sem, all of Allentown.

(IV) David Grim, son of Jacob and Catharina (Hottenstein), was born April 12, 1787. He died Oct. 12, 1838, and was buried in the cemetery on the farm owned by Mrs. Cecilia G. Butz. His five children were: Seth K., who had two daughters, Mary (m. William Kline, of Rothrocksville) and Catharina (m. Daniel P. Grim, of Kutztown); Daniel K.; David K., who had four children, Henry, George, Mary A. (m. William Miller, of Philadelphia), and Anna (m. a Mr. Bunker); Peter K., who married Elizabeth K. Mosser, and had nine children, David, Mary (m. William J. Frederick, of Reading), Catharine, Amanda, (m. John S. Hartzell, of Allentown), Emma (died in infancy), Jacob W. (whose only child, Anna K., is secretary of the Grim Reunion Association), Albert P., R. Matilda (m. Charles Appel, of Allentown) and Anna M. (m. Lewis Shankweiler, of Allentown); and Henrietta K., who married Jesse Kline.


Heinrich Grim, great-grandfather of Moses K., of Maxatawny township, was born in Maxatawny township in 1733, and he died upon his farm near Bowers Station in 1804. He owned the old Grim homestead two squares from Bowers Station, on which is the old mill-one of the land marks of the township. Heinrich Grim was a farmer and miller. He married Gertrude Trexler, and they had children: Absalom; Gideon (1760-1823); Jonathan; Daniel; Reuben; Solomon; Ann; and Polly.

Solomon Grim, son of Heinrich and Gertrude (Trexler), was a successful farmer and miller in Rockland township, where he died in 1815. He married Leah Kline, daughter of David Kline, the owner of much valuable property in Maxatawny. They had two children, Reuben, and a daughter that died in childhood.

Reuben Grim, son of Solomon and Leah (Kline), was born on his father's farm in Rockland township, March 7, 1816. For many years he conducted the mill in connection with farming, continuing this double occupation until 1866. He was very successful, and became the owner of three farms. In 1867 he moved to Maxatawny township to the farm now occupied by his son Moses K. He was a man of influence and was a prominent worker in the Lutheran Church at Lyons. He died Dec. 20, 1897. He married Diana Kutz, daughter of Daniel Kutz, of Maxatawny, and their children were: William; Solomon; Dewald, who died aged two years; Moses K.; Amanda, m. to Anthony Dengler, now of Michigan; Louisa, m. to the late Daniel Gaby; and Eliza, who died aged seven years.

Moses K. Grim, son of Reuben and Diana (Kutz), was born in Rockland township, May 8, 1845, and is now a prominent and successful farmer, located near Bowers Station, in Maxatawny township. His early training was along agricultural lines, and when he started out for himself in 1873, it was on the same farm on which he now resides. This consists of 110 acres, and Mr. Grim has been its owner since 1896. He is a man of much business capacity, and is possessed of more than ordinary intelligence, and is greatly esteemed in his locality. In his political affiliations he is a Republican, and from 1900 to 1903 served his township (which is nominally Democratic) on the school board, being that board's president for one year, and for some time its treasurer. With his family be belongs to Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church at Bowers. For a number of years they worshipped at St. Paul's Lutheran Church, at Lyons, where his father, Reuben, was an official.

In 1872 Mr. Moses K. Grim was married to Miss Emma C. Weiser, daughter of Elijah and Esther (Bieber) Weiser. Seven children were born of this union, namely: Jacob, born March 8, 1876; Louisa E., June 30, 1878; William G., April 25, 1881; Walter B., Nov. 4, 1883; Ida May, March 7, 1886; Julius H., July 2, 1888; and John E., April 2, 1890. ---------Gideon Grim, son of Heinrich and Gertrude (Trexler), was born in Maxatawny township in 1760, and died in 1823, an extensive and prosperous farmer. His wife, Elizabeth Kirby, was of English extraction. She bore him five sons and two daughters, as follows: David, Nathan, Gideon, Benjamin, Joshua, Hannah and Dinah.

Gideon Grim, son of Gideon and Elizabeth (Kirby), was born in Maxatawny township, Aug. 31, 1792, and died in Colebrookdale township, April 27, 1848. He married Esther Krouse, and they had two sons, William K.; and Levi, who died when eighteen years old.

William K. Grim, son of Gideon and Esther (Krouse), was born in Exeter township, May 28, 1825, and was one of the substantial and representative men of Boyertown. In his youth he learned the tanning trade, and this he followed successfully until 1874. In 1872 he moved to Boyertown, and there helped to organize the National Bank. He was also one of the organizers of the Farmers' National Bank of the same town. He was interested in the Colebrookdale Iron Company, of Pottstown, a large chartered corporation doing business since 1835. He was very level headed in business matters, and his judgment was frequently accepted as final. In 1853 he married Loretta B. Rhoads, daughter of John and Catharine (Boyer) Rhoads, and they have four children: Mahala, at home; Sallie, wife of Frank Sebold; William R., a bank cashier at Texarkana, Texas; and Kate, at home.


Jonathan Grim, son of Heinrich and Gertrude (Trexler), was a tanner in Maxatawny township, where he lived for many years. His later years were passed in Kutztown. He married (first) Catharine H. Bertolett, and by her had one son, Daniel B., born July 17, 1800. He m. (second) a Miss Snyder, and they had three children: Joshua S., Polly and Jonathan.

Daniel B. Grim, son of Jonathan and Catharine H. (Bertolett), born July 17, 1800, owned a farm of 220 acres at Grimville, where he kept a store, hotel and tannery many years, amassing a comfortable fortune. He was active in the State militia, and in public affairs always took an interested and prominent part. He was known as "Der Hellwedder Grim." In 1819 he married Elizabeth Krouse, and they became the parents of children as follows: Daniel P., born Aug. 31,1833, now a wealthy and influential citizen of Kutztown; Jonathan K.; Mary; Charlotte; Catharine; Sarah; Charles A. K.; Susan (Dietrich); and Amelia.



Joshua S. Grim, son of Jonathan by his marriage to Miss Snyder, became a tanner in Maxatawny township, near the Lehigh county line. He owned the farm of 140 acres now the property of Cyranius R. Grim. His first wife, whose maiden name was Bieber, bore him four children: Johathan; Catharine; Elizabeth; and Henry P. He m. (second) Mary Zimmerman, daughter of Esau Zimmerman, and the five children of this union were: Charles A., Joshua I., Cyranius R., Mary and Susan.

Cyranius R. Grim, son of Joshua S. and Mary (Zimmerman), was born on his father's farm July 22, 1852. In his earlier years he engaged in tanning, but in 1884 began farming, making a specialty of his poultry, of which he is very proud. For many years he has been one of the active and energetic workers in the Democratic party of Maxatawny township, and in 1889 was elected assessor, an office he has continued to fill to the satisfaction of all ever since. In 1881 he married Amelia L. Raubenhold, and they have six children: Mary E., Walter J., Cyranius R., Jr., Martha A., Rose Ann L. and Solon D.


GRIM, WILLIAM K.

p. 381

Surnames: GRIM, KIRBY, KNOUSE, RHOADS, SEIGFRIED, DRESHER, MERKER, SABOLD, HAUBERGER, BOYER

William K. Grim was a very prominent and influential citizen at Boyertown, and his death Aug. 14, 1905, was greatly deplored. The Grim family is one of the oldest in the county, and owes its residence here to the emigration from Germany of Johan Egidius Grim. The home of the family was originally in Normandy, and the lineage is traced back to a Baron there in the time of William the Conqueror. One branch of the family went to Alsace, and to that branch the Berks county Grims belong.

(I) Johan Egidius Grim came to America in 1728 with the Rev. John Casper Stoever, and he settled first in Weisenburg township, Northampton (now Lehigh) county, but it appears he later came to Maxatawny township, Berks county, and secured a large tract of land. His house was a most substantial one, and to it other settlers fled for refuge in time of Indian disturbances. Two of his sons served in the war of the Revolution, and most of his descendants are members of the Lutheran Church. The will of "Gitti, alias Gideon" Grim was made Jan. 28, 1760, and was probated Oct. 1, 1761, when Jacob and Henry Grim, his sons, were appointed as executors. In this will he gave his land to his sons Jacob and Henry; fifty pounds to his daughter Cattarina; fifty pounds to his daughter Elizabeth (who married Casper Merker); thirty pounds to Francis Roth "son of my daughter Margreth."

(II) Henry Grim, son of Gitti was born in Maxatawny township in 1733, and died in 1804. He married and had three children: Jacob, Jonathan and Gideon.

(III) Gideon Grim, son of Henry, was born in Maxatawny township, where he became an extensive and successful farmer. His death occurred in 1823, when he was aged sixty-three years. By his wife, Elizabeth Kirby, an Englishwoman, he became the father of five sons and two daughters, namely: David, who died unmarried; Nathan, who settled at farming in Columbia county, Pa.; Gideon and Benjamin, millers at Weisenburg, in Lehigh county; Joshua, a farmer on the homestead; Hannah (m. John Seigfried); and Dinah (m. John Dresher).

(IV) Gideon Grim, son of Gideon and Elizabeth , was born on the old homestead in Maxatawny township Aug. 31, 1792. He carried on milling and farming for many years in Exeter township at the home of his father-in-law, Henry Knouse. In 1830 he purchased in Colebrookdale township two farms of about ninety acres each, with a tan yard, and these he operated until his death April 27, 1848. He was buried in the Boyertown cemetery. He hauled the product of his farm and tannery to market in Philadelphia by team, and was well known throughout the county. He was an official member of the Lutheran Church. He married Esther Knouse, and had two children: William K.; and Levi, who died at the age of eighteen.

(V) William K. Grim was a son of Gideon and Esther, and was born in Exeter township May 28, 1825. He early learned the tanner's trade from his father, and often used to accompany the latter on his trips to Philadelphia, and at the age of sixteen William K. began making these trips alone. He operated the tan yard until 1874, when that enterprise was abandoned on account of the scarcity of tan bark. A flour and grist mill was then built on the property, and this is still in operation. Two years before this Mr. Grim had moved to Boyertown, and in the business life of that town he at once entered, taking an active part therein until his death. He built the large Grim block, was instrumental in organizing the National Bank of Boyertown, of which he was a director for some years, and later he was one of the organizers of the Farmers' National Bank, in which he was a director and later vice president. He was a heavy stockholder in the Colebrookdale Iron Company, established in 1835, and incorporated in 1886, and located at Pottstown, and after he became its president its scope was largely increased, their goods being shipped to all parts of the world. In politics Mr. Grim was a Democrat, and for thirteen years was burgess of Boyertown, and during the administration of President Cleveland was its postmaster. He was a member of the Lutheran Church, and in that faith died Aug. 14, 1905.

On June 11, 1853, William K. Grim married Loretta B. Rhoads, daughter of John and Catharine Rhoads. She was born Aug. 21, 1825, and died Aug. 4, 1906. Her maternal grandparents were Henry and Sarah Boyer. Henry Boyer and his brother Daniel were the first settlers of Boyertown, and from them the town derived its name. To William K. and Loretta B. Grim were born four children: Mahella, Sarah (m. Frank W. Sabold, manager of the New York Telephone Company, at Yonkers, N. Y., who in 1902 became associated, in an official capacity, with The Hudson River Telephone Company, at Albany, N. Y., at which place he died April 16, 1904), William R., and Kate.

(VI) William R. Grim, son of William K. and Loretta B. Grim, was born April 24, 1860, and was given the benefit of a good education. After studying in the public schools, he went to Mt. Pleasant Seminary and then to Muhlenberg College, graduating from the latter in 1882. He read law at Salina, Kans., and was there admitted to the Bar. He later went to Texas, and located at Texarkana, where he became cashier of the Texarkana National Bank, and in 1903 was elected its president. This bank is a strong financial institution, and is a power in its locality. Mr. Grim is also interested in railroads. He married Sarah Hauberger, of Philadelphia, and they have two children, Emeline and Loretta.


GRIMES, PETER

p. 933

Surnames: GRIMES, HENRY, WENRICH, LEININGER, BECKER, THOMPSON, SHEARER, WHITE, BORRY, WALMER, ZIMMERMAN, TREXLER, NESTER, KNODERER

Peter Grimes, of Womelsdorf, Pa., who is engaged in carpentering, and who is a veteran of the Civil war, was born Aug. 29, 1846, in Heidelberg township, Berks county, son of Peter and Sarah (Wenrich) Grimes.

Henry Grimes, his grandfather, was of Heidelberg township, where as a lad he was bound out as a servant in a family. Later he engaged in agricultural pursuits and became the owner of a tract of 150 acres in the mountains in Heidelberg township, cultivating his land in addition to teaching the "three R's" in German subscription schools, the principal text-books being the Psalter and the New Testament. Mr. Grimes married Susanna Leininger, who after his death married George Becker. Mr. Grimes is buried at the Corner Church. He and his wife had these children: Peter; John; Anna; Benjamin; David; Henry; Joseph; Franklin, of Marion township; Daniel, of Mill Creek township, Lebanon county; Mary, of West Philadelphia; and Jacob of near Denver, Lancaster county.

Peter Grimes, father of Peter, was born Aug. 29, 1819, and died May 11, 1882, in Heidelberg township, after having spent his life in various places. He was engaged in agricultural pursuits and fence making. He was a member of Zion's Lutheran Church, where he was buried. Mr. Grimes married Sarah Wenrich, born June 14, 1821, died Dec. 21, 1895, daughter of David Wenrich, who was married three times, having five children by his first wife, five by the second, and nine by the third. Mrs. Grimes was of the second marriage, her mother's maiden name being Henry. To Mr. And Mrs. Grimes were born: John, who died during the Civil war at Beaufort Hospital, S. C.; Peter; Henry, of Womelsdorf; Franklin, deceased, who had a son Franklin; and Sarah, who married William Thompson, of Philadelphia, in which city she died.

Peter Grimes spent his youth upon the home farm, where he worked until the outbreak of the Civil war, at which time his youthful heart was fired by patriotism, and on Oct. 27, 1862, he enlisted as a drummer boy in Company A, 167th Pa. Vol. Inf., being then but sixteen years old. He served nine months, and was mustered out Aug. 12, 1863, at Reading, having participated in the battle of Black Water (where Colonel Knoderer was killed) and the siege of Suffolk. He re-enlisted Feb. 19, 1864, at Womelsdorf, becoming a private of Company B, 55th Pa. Vol. Inf., Capt. John C. Shearer, of Robesonia, and Col. Richard White, of Indiana County, Pa. He was mustered into the service at Reading, and received his honorable discharge at Petersburg, Aug. 30, 1865, the war having closed. During his long and faithful service Mr. Grimes participated in the battles of Old Town Creek; Proctor's Creek; Drury's Bluff; Cold Harbor, June 3-10, 1864, where he was wounded in the head by a piece of bursting shell; Petersburg, June 16-17-18, 1864; Cemetery Hill; Chapin's Farm; Hatcher's Run, March 30-31; Fort Gregg; capture of Petersburg, April 2; Rice Station, April 6, and surrender of Lee at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865. Mr. Grimes was always a faithful and willing soldier, gallant in action, and cheerful during the long and tedious marches. He was popular among his comrades and respected by his officers, and his war record is one of which any man might well be proud.

On his return from the war, Mr. Grimes located in Womelsdorf, and took up carpentering and fence making at which he gained quite a reputation. He has long been known as an expert carpenter, and has done much work in Womelsdorf and vicinity. In 1864 he purchased a house on South Front street; with his bounty money. In politics, he is a Republican, and twice against his will, he was elected to the town council, in which body he served very efficiently. He is a member of Capt. William Tice Post, No. 471, G. A. R., of Myerstown, Pa. He and his family are members of Zion Union Church, belonging to the Lutheran congregation.

On Jan. 22, 1871, Mr. Grimes was married to Henrietta Borry, daughter of Samuel Borry, of Lancaster county, Pa., and they have the following children: John B., of Lebanon, who married Annie Walmer; Charles D., who resides at Newmanstown, Pa., married to Nora Zimmerman; Calvin P., of Womelsdorf, who married Emma Trexler; Katie S. and Monroe O., unmarried, who are at home; Samuel, of Womelsdorf, who married Katie Nester; and Mary, who is unmarried and resides at home.


GRIMLEY, OLIVER P.

p. 1314

Surnames: GRIMLEY, MOYER, ZIEGLER, JACOBS, SHANER

Oliver P. Grimley, the popular cashier of the Kutztown National Bank and one of the organizers of that well-known institution, was born April 2, 1846, in Upper Hanover township, Montgomery Co., Pa., son of Jeremiah and Mary Ann (Moyer) Grimley, and grandson of Frederick Grimley.

Frederick Grimley, who was an agriculturist of Salford, Montgomery county, was the father of these children: William, Jeremiah, Amos, Mary, Mrs. Trout, Mrs. Hallman, Jesse and Albert.

Jeremiah Grimley was born and reared in Upper Salford, Montgomery county, and after the completion of his education engaged in teaching, which he followed for many years, first in New Hanover and later in Upper Hanover. Later in life he settled upon a farm in Frederick township, where he died in 1858, ripe in years, being respected by all who knew him for his many sterling qualities. He was a member of the Reformed Church and an active worker therein and deacon for many years. He was twice married, hi first wife being Mary Ann Moyer, a daughter of Jacob Moyer of Upper Hanover township. To this union there were born: Oliver P.; and J. M., an extensive dealer in carpets, wood and willow ware of Allentown, Pa. Jeremiah Grimley's second marriage was to Mrs. Ziegler, who bore the maiden name of Louisa Jacobs. One daughter was born to the second union, Clara A., a telegrapher of Philadelphia.

Oliver P. Grimley was reared on his father's farm and his early education was obtained in the local schools of his native township. Later he attended Freeland Seminary, Ursinus College and the Pierce Business College at Philadelphia, graduating from the latter institution in 1869. He began teaching in the public schools of Montgomery county in his early manhood and continued to serve for eleven terms. He then entered the service of the Perkiomen Railway Company as freight agent of Schwenksville and afterward became the station agent at Palm station. He remained in the employ of the company until 1883 when he removed to Boyertown to fill the position of teller of the National Bank of Boyertown and he continued there for fourteen years. In 1897 Mr. Grimley, with certain capitalists at Kutztown and vicinity, organized the Kutztown National Bank, with a capital of $50,000, and he was selected as the cashier. From the beginning the operations of the bank showed evidence of superior management and by the year 1904 it appeared on the roll of honor of the national banks of the United States. Its surplus was earned, not paid in, as is done in many cases; and the bank's success is attributable in a large degree to Mr. Grimley's ability as a financier.

In 1872 Mr. Grimley was married to Sevilla Shaner, daughter of Isaac Shaner, a farmer of Frederick township, Montgomery county. They have two sons: Isaac C., teller of the Kutztown National Bank till 1902, and now assistant cashier of that institution, is greatly interested in collecting historical autographs, and is an antiquarian of some distinction; and Oliver Raymond is head book-keeper of the Keystone Shoe Manufacturing Company at Kutztown. Mr. Grimley is identified with the Free Masons, the Odd Fellows, and the Knights of Pythias; in politics he is a Democrat.


GRING FAMILY

p. 1516

Surnames: GRING, WALDSCHMIDT, LICHTY, TROXEL, STAMM, HILL, ZERR, GRILL, WEACHTER, FISHER, WALTERS, STEFFY, GAUL, GENSEMER, OBERLY, FLEISCHER, MILLER, HARDER, MUHLENBERG, STRUNK, POTTEIGER, SPOHN, LORAH, LENGEL, SANDS, RUTH, MEADE

One of the old and honorable families of Berks county, Pa., members of which have distinguished themselves in business and political life and in military circles, is that of Gring, who has as representatives in Spring township many men of prominence. This sketch has to do with two brothers, Franklin H. and Charles H. Gring, and their nephew, Lewis W. Gring, well known citizens and substantial business men of Sinking Spring.

Johannes Gring, the founder of this family in America, crossed the ocean in the ship "Lydia" from Rotterdam, which landed at Philadelphia, Sept. 20, 1743.

Samuel Gring, son of Johannes, was born in Holland, and was but a lad when his parents emigrated. He settled in Cumru, about 1760, and there acquired land and prospered, dying a wealthy man, and he occupies an unknown grave in the vicinity of Sinking Spring.

David Gring, grandfather of Charles H. and Franklin H. and the great-grandfather of Lewis W., was born Feb. 9, 1760 in Cumru township, Berks county. In early life he located at the Tulpehocken creek, where he took up a tract of land, built several grist mills, and like his father, became prosperous. He died Feb. 1, 1848, aged eighty-eight years, less eight days. David Gring was married (first) Dec. 7, 1790, to Anna Maria Waldschmidt, of the Fatherland, whose parents came to America with Samuel Gring. Tradition has it that the Grings and Waldschmidts were neighbors before coming to this country. Anna Maria Waldschmidt was born Aug. 3, 1767, and died April 20, 1818. She bore her husband these children: John, a minister of the Reformed Church; William, a miller of the Tulpehocken Creek; David; Daniel, born July 9, 1798, a minister of the Reformed Church, who died Sept. 5, 1862 (his wife, Esther, born March 8, 1799, died Dec. 3, 1861); Susan, who died unmarried; a daughter, who married a Mr. Lichty; and one who married a Mr. Troxel. Mr. Gring's second wife was Gertrude Stamm, born July 12, 1772, who died March 31, 1857, aged eighty-four years, eight months and nineteen days.

David Gring, son of David and father of Charles H. and Franklin H., was born March 9, 1806 and died Jan. 26, 1890, aged eighty-three years, ten months, seventeen days. He was married June 25, 1826, to Maria Hill, who was born Oct. 6, 1803, and died May 18, 1885, aged eighty-one years, seven months and twelve days. Their union was blessed with these children: David H., born Jan. 11, 1829, a miller; Daniel, born July 27, 1830, a farmer; Samuel, born Oct. 7, 1832, who is still living, is a prominent lumber dealer of Reading; Ann, born Feb. 22, 1834, is the widow of George Zerr; Mary born Nov. 22, 1836, married Joshua Grill; John, born March 27, 1838, a miller and tanner; Charles H., born Feb. 18, 1840; Lewis, who died at the age of fifteen years, one day; Franklin H., born July 14, 1844; and Levi, born Nov. 30, 1847, died Dec. 1, 1862. The father of the above children followed in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, and at the time of his death he was the owner of several farms and a good grist mill. He was first a Whig and later a Republican in politics, and was prominent in public matters of his day and generation. Mr. Gring served ad captain, and later as major in the State Militia, occupying the latter rank for eleven years.

David H. Gring, father of Lewis W., and brother of Charles H. and Franklin H., was born Jan. 11, 1829, in Lower Heidelberg township, and died March 10, 1904. He was a farmer and miller and owned and conducted the well known Gring mill for more than half a century. Mr. Gring married Catherine Weachter, born April 30, 1836, who still survives and retains the old homestead. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. David H. Gring, namely: George, of Sinking Spring; Thomas of Wernersville, Pa.; Lewis W., who is mentioned below; and two who died in infancy.

Franklin H. Gring was born on the old stand across the line in Spring township, July 15, 1844, and was reared upon the farm. Until twenty-six years of age he worked for his parents, at which time he set out for himself, and in 1871 began farming the home property, where he lived for three years. The next location of Mr. Gring was Denver, Lancaster county, but subsequently, in 1876, he purchased the old Alex Fisher farm, at Fritztown, a tract of thirty-two acres of fertile land, and here he has since lived. He has a fine little place which he has greatly improved. It is located along the Lancaster road, and the road running from Fritztown to Wernersville, at the foot of Cushion Hill, and is supplied with some of the finest water in the world. The property includes many fruit trees, and is in an excellent state of cultivation. Mr. Gring is a Republican in politics, and he and his family are members of St. John's Reformed Church of Sinking Spring.

On Jan. 14, 1871, Franklin H. Gring was married to Mary Fisher, born Sept. 14, 1851, daughter of Alexander and Kate (Walters) Fisher, and granddaughter of John Fisher, who owned many acres of land around the Keener's mill. Mr. and Mrs. Gring have had eight children: Harry R., who resides near his father at Fritztown, and manufactures cigars, married Mary Steffey, and they have one son, Stephen; Katie V. died in infancy; Alva G. married Charles Gaul, of Wernersville, and has two sons, Robert and Harvey; Edwin F., of Lancaster, Pa., married Alice Gensemer, and has a son, Elwood; Millie E., who married H. C. Oberly, of Lancaster county; David A., who was killed Nov. 12, 1902, by the accidental discharge of a gun while hunting in Lebanon county; Mary A., who married Oscar Fleischer, born Oct. 7, 1885, an employe of the State Asylum at Wernersville; and William F., born July 10, 1890.

Charles H. Gring was born in Spring township, March 18, 1840, and was reared at Gring's Mill and on the farm belonging to the mill property. He attended the township schools, and worked with his father until he was of age, when he embarked in farming for himself. This he continued until his enlistment, Oct. 27, 1863, in Company E, 167th Pa. V. I., with which he served nine months, and later was drafted for three years in Company B, 11th U. S. Cavalry, serving until the close of the war. Mr. Gring had two miraculous escapes during the service. At Blackwater a bullet struck a tree, and glancing off, entered the back of his neck, this bullet, or a part of it, still being in his head, back of his right ear. On another occasion a bursting shell injured the third finger on his right hand. Mr. Gring has as many thrilling experiences during his army career as any soldier in the war. He became corporal of his company, and for meritorious service was promoted to skirmish bugler. He showed extraordinary courage on every occasion, and it was often remarked that he knew no fear. The hard and trying experiences of a soldier disabled Mr. Gring, and after his return home he was stricken with rheumatism, contracted during his service, and the year of sickness which followed wasted his body to such a degree that he weighed but ninety-two pounds.

After partial recovery Mr. Gring engaged in farming on his father's property, where he continued for twelve years, at the end of which time this was sold, and he located in Heidelberg township, where he operated the property of Henry and Charles Miller, when this farm was also sold. Mr. Gring then spent one year at Wernersville, and in 1880 he purchased the "Centennial Hotel," at Sinking Spring, which he successfully conducted for three years. In 1884 he again engaged in farming on the 200-acre tract of William Harder, in Heidelberg township, which he cultivated for two years, and at the end of this time took charge of the well known H. H. Muhlenberg farm of 542 acres, now embraced in the city limits of Reading. Here he had ninety-two milk cows and twenty-two head of horses. In addition to his nine children, he hired six regular men and several maids, forty people going to one table. Besides farming, he conducted a stone quarry, where he employed eleven men.

Mr. Gring has always been noted for his generosity and hospitality, and on Labor day, for four successive years, he gave a great dinner to the letter carriers and clerks of Reading, this being one of the jolliest occasions of the whole year. His home was a great gathering place for the Reading firemen, and any one was welcome to share his bed and board. On this farm Mr. Gring continued to reside until the death of his good wife, when he sold out his vast farm stock at the public sale in the spring of 1899, at which time he took out a license for his hotel at Sinking Spring, which he has conducted very successfully to the present time. He has a first rate hostelry, which is patronized by the best people of the community. Throughout his life Mr. Gring has been an industrious, hard-working man, and as a consequence, although he has lost over $10,000 through loaning to dishonest persons, he is in very comfortable circumstances. In politics he is a Republican. He is a member of the Jr. O. U. A. M.; the Knights of the Golden Eagle; Post No. 76, G. A. R.; and the Marion Fire Company, of Reading, since 1887. He is a member of St. John's Reformed Church, where his children have all been confirmed, and where he has been a deacon. Mr. Gring has a fine family lot in the new cemetery.

Mr. Gring is an enthusiastic sportsman, and every year takes a trip to some distant point, his outing in the fall of 1906, being to the spot where he was wounded. He has also quite a collection of relics, souvenirs, etc., principal among which are the sword, epaulettes and hat of Gen. George Washington, concerning which we are allowed to quote from a local paper: "Very few people are aware of the fact that the original hat worn by Gen. Washington and his sabre and epaulettes are in the possession of a Berks county man. Charles H. Gring, proprietor of the upper hotel at Sinking Spring, claims to be the fortunate owner of these articles, and they have been in his possession for many years. He prizes them very highly and takes great pleasure in showing them to visitors. Mr. Gring has had frequent offers to sell them to historical societies and relic hunters, but refused them all. Mr. Gring's father, the late Major David Gring, who was in the civil war, received the articles from his grandfather. The latter was a lieutenant on Gen. Washington's staff, and a short time before the close of the Revolution Gen. Washington, it is declared, presented Lieut. Gring with his sabre and belt, hat and epaulettes. The articles were in Major David Gring's possession for many years, and a short time before his demise he presented them to his son, the present owner. Mr. Gring saw three years service in the Civil war, and besides his father was the only one of the family to go to the front. For this reason the articles were given to him. The hat once worn by Gen. Washington is kept in a large box. It is in a fair state of preservation. It is shaped like a half moon and is made of some stiff black cloth material. Both sides are trimmed with black braid about a quarter of an inch wide and well worn. In the center of the hat on the outside is a large American eagle of silver. Silver cords encircles the brim and the hat almost comes to a point. When Mr. Gring first secured the old hat there was a red and a blue feather on top of it. Both have long since crumbled away. There was a small piece of paper on the band containing the name and date of the presentation of the hat to Lieut. Gring. It is a foot high and twenty-two inches long. The sabre and belt are in excellent condition. The sword is of the finest kind of steel and is handsomely engraved. The hilt is formed from a solid gold plate. The grip is formed by a coiled snake, the tail of which is fastened in an eagle's beak. At several places on both sides of the blade are thirteen stars, one for each of the original colonies. The scabbard is of steel and the belt of genuine horsehide. The epaulettes are of solid silver, with a red white and blue field on the top piece. The fringe is of silver cord of heavy weight."

In 1860 Mr. Gring was married to Mary A. Miller, born Sept. 25, 1838, who died Jan. 6, 1901, daughter of Isaac and Mary (Strunk) Miller, of Spring township, and to this union there were born children as follows: William, m. to Katie Fisher; Lillie, m. to John Potteiger; Charles H., of Alsace Church; Katie, m. to John Spohn; Edwin, m. to Edith Lorah; Annie, m. to Frank Lengel; Harvey; Irwin, who is unmarried; and Edith, m. to William Sands.

Lewis W. Gring, son of David H., was born July 19, 1867, in Spring township, and was educated in the district schools and also spent two years at a graded school. He was reared on his father's farm, and at the mill conducted by him, and when but eighteen years of age engaged in the manufacture of hosiery on his father's farm, erecting a small mill, the machinery of which was run by water power. Here he continued for about seven years, when he came to Sinking Spring, and for one year engaged in manufacturing alone, when he took into partnership James Ruth, which connection continued for about one year. At the end of this time Mr. Gring became the employe of Nolde & Horst, extensive hosiery manufacturers of Reading, with which firm he remained about two years, subsequently becoming employed at the Textile Works. After two years in this company's employ, Mr. Gring erected a small house and factory at Sinking Spring, and on Jan. 25, 1904, he began manufacturing again. He now has a one story factory, 40 x 70 feet, and employes about forty people, the daily output, which finds a ready market, being 200 dozen machine grade and 144 needle goods. Mr. Gring is a thorough business man, and has the respect and esteem of the community in which he resides.

On April 14, 1895, Mr. Gring was married to Ellen Meade, daughter of Patrick Meade (born Aug. 7, 1826, who died Jan. 16, 1882), and his wife Mary A. (born April 5, 1833, who died in Aug. 1907). Mr. Gring and his wife reside in a nice residence on the Lancaster road, in Sinking Spring, adjoining his factory, and they attend St. John's Reformed Church.


GRING, HARRY R.

p. 1429

Surnames: GRING, WALDSCHMIDT, LICHTY, TROXEL, STAMM, HILL, ZERR, GRILL, FISHER, WALTERS, GAUL, GENSEMER, OBERLY, FLEISCHER, STEFFY, KLINE

Harry R. Gring, cigar manufacturer of Fritztown, Berks county, belongs to one of the old families of the county, being a son of Franklin H. Gring and a descendant of Johannes Gring.

Johannes Gring, the founder of the family in America, crossed the ocean on the ship "Lydia," from Rotterdam, which landed at Philadelphia Sept. 20, 1743. His son Samuel, who was a lad when his parents emigrated, settled in Cumru, some time after 1760. Here he acquired land and prospered, dying a wealthy man, and occupies an unknown grave in the vicinity of Sinking Spring.

David Gring, the great-grandfather of Harry R. Gring, was born Feb. 9, 1760, in Cumru township, Berks county. In early life he located at Tulpehocken Creek, where he took up a tract of land, built several gristmills and, like his father, became prosperous. He died Feb. 1, 1848, aged eighty-eight years less eight days. David Gring was married (first) Dec. 7, 1790, to Martha Waldschmidt, of the Fatherland, whose parents came to America with Samuel Gring. Tradition has it that the Grings and Waldschmidts were neighbors before coming to this country. Martha (Waldschmidt) Gring was born Aug. 3, 1767, and passed to her reward April 20, 1818. She and her husband had the following children: John, a minister of the Reformed Church; William, a miller on Tulpehocken creek; David; Daniel, a minister of the Reformed Church, born July 9, 1798, died Sept. 5, 1862 (his wife, Esther, born March 8, 1799, died Dec. 3, 1861, aged sixty-two years, eight months, twenty-five days); Susan, who died unmarried; a daughter, who married a Mr. Lichty; and one who married a Mr. Troxel. Mr. Gring's second wife was Gertrude Stamm, born July 12, 1772, who died March 31, 1857, aged eighty-four years, eight months, nineteen days.

David Gring, grandfather of Harry R. Gring, was born March 9, 1806, and died Jan. 26, 1890, aged eighty-three years, ten months, seventeen days.

He was married June 25, 1826, to Maria Hill, born Oct. 6, 1803, died May 18, 1885, aged eighty-one years, seven months, twelve days. Their union was blessed with these children: David, born Jan. 11, 1829, a miller; Daniel, born July 27, 1830, a farmer; Samuel, born Oct. 7, 1832, who is still living, a prominent lumber dealer of Reading; Ann, born Feb. 22, 1834, widow of George Zerr; Mary born Nov. 22, 1836, who married Joshua Grill; John, born March 27, 1838, a miller and tanner; Charles H., born Feb. 18, 1840; Lewis, who died aged fifteen years, one day; Franklin H., born July 14, 1844; and Levi, born Nov. 30, 1847, died Dec. 1, 1862.

The father of this family followed in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, and at the time of his death was the owner of several farms and a good gristmill. He was first a Whig and later a Republican in politics, and was prominent in the public matters of his day and generation. Mr. Gring served as captain, and later as major, in the State militia, occupying the latter rank for eleven years.

Franklin H. Gring was born on the old stand across the line in Spring township July 15 (14), 1844, and was reared upon the farm. Until twenty-six years of age he worked for his parents, at which time he set out for himself, and in 1871 began farming the home property, where he lived for three years. The next location of Mr. Gring was Denver, Lancaster county, but subsequently, in 1876, he purchased the old Alexander Fisher

farm, at Fritztown, a tract of thirty-two acres of fertile land, and here he has since lived. He has a fine little place, which he has greatly improved. It is located along the Lancaster road and the road running from Fritztown to Wernersville, at the foot of Cushion Hill, and is supplied with some of the finest water in the world. On the property are many fruit trees and it is in an excellent state of cultivation. Mr. Gring is a Republican in politics, and he and his family are members of St. John's Reformed Church at Sinking Spring.

On Jan. 14, 1871, Franklin H. Gring married Mary Fisher, born Sept. 14, 1851, daughter of Alexander and Kate (Walters) Fisher, and granddaughter of John Fisher, who owned many acres of land around the Keener's mill. Mr. and Mrs. Gring have had eight children: Harry R. is mentioned further on; Katie V. died in infancy; Alva G. m. Charles Gaul, of Wernersville, and has two sons, Robert and Harvey; Edwin F., of Lancaster, Pa., m. Alice Gensemer, and has one son, Elwood; Millie E. m. H. C. Oberly, of Lancaster county; David A. was killed by the accidental discharge of a gun while hunting in Lebanon county, dying Nov. 12, 1902, aged eighteen years, six months, eighteen days; Mary A. m. Oscar Fleischer, born Oct. 7, 1885, an employe of the State Asylum at Wernersville; and William F. was born July 10, 1890.

Harry R. Gring, eldest of the family of Franklin H. Gring, was born in 1871 in the building at Fritztown where his cigar factory is now located. He attended the public schools of Lower Heidelberg township, and as well a summer school, and by the time he was seventeen was prepared to teach school, beginning at the Spohn school in Spring township. Before he began teaching he was in the lumber business in Bedford county, Pa., for a year. After teaching three terms he went into the service of the Pennsylvania & Reading Railroad Company, remaining in that employ for two years. He was next engaged by the Montello Brick Company for two and a half years, after which he commenced in his present line, as foreman for his brother-in-law, P. K. Steffy, who was then in the cigar manufacturing business at Fritztown. In 1899 he embarked in the business on his own account. He had been foreman for his brother-in-law for two years, during which time he acquired a thorough knowledge of cigar manufacturing, in which he has made a decided success. His factory is No. 43. Mr. Gring employs as many as twenty-seven hands in his establishment, and the product is sold mainly in Philadelphia and the West.

On Nov. 23, 1889, Mr. Gring was married to Mary V. Steffy, daughter of Isaac L. and Margaret (Kline) Steffy. One child has been born to them, Stephen E. Mr. Gring is a member of St. John's Reformed Church at Sinking Spring. He is a member of the K. of P. lodge at that place, of I. O. O. F. Lodge No. 835, at Wernersville and of Reading Tent, K. O. T. M. He is a Republican in politics and interested in local public affairs, having served three years as school director of Lower Heidelberg township.


GRING, SAMUEL H.

p. 372

Surnames: GRING, HILL, WALSMITH, LICHTY, TROXEL, RINGLER, HILL, ZERR, GRILL, HOYER, CALDWELL, SNYDER, LEITHEISER, FISHER

Among the representative business men of Reading, who have been identified with the large interests of the city, may be mentioned Mr. Samuel H. Gring, a prominent lumberman, contractor and financier. Mr. Gring was born in Cumru township, Berks Co., Pa., Oct. 7, 1832, son of David and Mary (Hill) Gring, and grandson of David Gring.

The great-grandfather, Samuel, son of Johannes (who emigrated in 1743, and who founded the family in America), came from Holland, and settled in Cumru township, where he became an extensive land-owner and died a wealthy man. His son, David, was born in Cumru township, but in early life located at Tulpehocken creek, where he took up a tract of land, built mills, and like his father became very prosperous. He died at the age of eighty-eight years in February, 1847. By his first wife, a Miss Walsmith, he had eight children as follows: John, who was a minister of the Reformed Church; William, a miller; David, father of Samuel H.; Daniel, a minister of the Reformed Church; Susan, who died unmarried; Mary, m. to a Mr. Lichty; Elizabeth, m. to a Mr. Troxel; and Kate, m. to a Mr. Ringler.

David Gring followed in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, and at the time of his death, Jan. 26, 1890, aged eighty-three years, ten months, seventeen days, he was the owner of several farms and a good mill. He was a Whig, and later became a strong Republican, was prominent in the affairs of his day, and served as captain and major in the State militia for eleven years. He married Mary Hill, who died May 18, 1885, at the age of eighty-one years, seven months, twelve days. To this union were born twelve children, eight of whom grew to maturity, as follows: David, a miller; Daniel (engaged in farming); Samuel H.; Annie (m. George Zerr); Mary (m. Joshua Grill); John (a miller and tanner); Charles (proprietor of a hotel); and Franklin (a farmer). The family were all members of the Reformed Church.

Samuel H. Gring was educated in the schools of Spring township and remained on the home farm until twenty-five years of age, working about the home mill, driving a team, and turning his hand to any employment that presented itself. He then went to East Cocalico township, near Denver, where he purchased a mill and remained until 1871, selling out in this year and removing to Newville, Cumberland county. Here he engaged in a lumber business, buying a tract of timber land which he converted into lumber for railroad purposes, and in 1876 he removed to Muhlenburg, locating in his present home two years later. This house was built about 1734, and at the time Mr. Gring purchased it it was the property of Dr. Muhlenberg. His next lumber enterprise was back of Lewistown, where he purchased a tract of pine and oak timber. He then went to Mount Rock, Cumberland county, and afterward in turn to a tract near Mechanicsburg, to near the Loop in Perry county, Pa., to Bloomfield, Perry county (where he operated two saw mills), to Turley Valley (where he operated three mills), to Huntingdon county, Pa. (where he carried on operations for three years), and to Bedford county, Pa., until 1886, in which year he purchased 10,000 acres of land, building a railroad sixteen miles long to get lumber out, this road being known as the Diamond Valley Railroad. In 1890 he returned to Perry county and leased seventy-one tracts of timber land, surveyed the line to New Germantown, a distance of thirty miles, and in September of that year grading was commenced, ties put down and rails laid. By Jan. 26th of the following years, sixteen miles of railroad had been built, and the following year the road was built to Blaine, and in 1892 completed from Newport to New Germantown. Mr. Gring's son, David Gring, is the president of both of these roads, including the one from Duncannon to Bloomfield, which is known as the Perry County Railway, and father and son deal extensively in lumber in North Carolina, Virginia and throughout the South, also being the owners of twenty-five water companies.

On Dec. 14, 1856, Mr. Samuel H. Gring married Catherine Hoyer, daughter of Simon Hoyer, a bridge-builder. She died June 8, 1900, aged sixty-three years. Nine children were born to this union: David, of Newport, m. Emma Caldwell, and has five children--Bruce, Rodney, Herbert, Wilber and Elizabeth; Kate m. Daniel B. Snyder, and had nine children --Sue S., Evan G., Lucy M., Charles L., Lester B. and four that died young; Elizabeth m. John Leitheiser, and has two children--Hattie and Grace; Samuel, deceased, m. Annie Fisher, and has one child--Bertha; Charles died at the age of twenty years; Susan died at the age of four years; and three died in infancy. In religious belief Mr. Gring and his family are members of the Grace (Alsace) Reformed Church of Reading, he being a member of the finance committee. In politics a Republican, he was treasurer of the township of East Cocalico, Lancaster Co., Pa., during the latter years of the war.

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