Biographies from Historical and Biographical Annals by Morton Montgomery

EDINGER, LEVI

p. 837

Surnames: HIGH, TOBIAS, EDDINGER, DAVIDHEISER, HASSLER, ZIEBER, IDYLE, HOMAN, TATE, TROUT, HARTMAN, LINCOLN, RAUDENBUSH, CLOUSER, WOLF

Levi Edinger, one of the leading agriculturists of Berks county, Pa., whose excellent 200-acre property at Poplar Neck, in Cumru township, is known as the General William High homestead, was born Jan. 17, 1863, in Alsace township, Berks county, son of Levi and Esther (Tobias) Edinger.

Abraham Edinger (also spelled Eddinger), the progenitor of this family in America, came from Germany in the ship "Phoenix," landing at Philadelphia Oct. 1, 1754. He settled in Berks county, where the rest of his life was spent, and among others had these children: Christian, grandfather of Levi; Frederick; and Andrew, who settled in Western Pennsylvania.

Christian Edinger, son of Abraham, was a blacksmith in Oley township, where he lived for many years, but in later life went to Alsace township, where he followed his trade. It was while shoeing a horse that a kick from the animal caused Mr. Edinger's death, in 1856, in his fifty-sixth year, and he was buried at Spies's Church. Mr. Edinger married Catherine Davidheiser, and to them were born these children: Ann m. Reuben Hassler; John, born Aug. 15, 1827, m. Sarah Zieber; and has two children ----James and Sarah; Frederick was a carpenter of Alsace township; Elizabeth m. (first) James Idyle and (second) John Homan; Harrison was a resident of Reading; Levi; Daniel also lived in Reading; Kate m. James Tate, and Fannie m. Reuben Trout.

Levi Edinger, the father of Levi, was born July 25, 1831, in Alsace township, and died Aug. 21, 1882. In 1865 he removed from Alsace township to a farm in Spring township, continuing there for four years, when he located on the Edinger farm in Cumru township, this being his home until his death. He was a member of Montgomery Lodge, I. O. O. F., Reading, and of the Hebron Encampment of the same order. Mr. Edinger was buried at Spies's Church, of which he was an official member. On Feb. 2, 1850, Mr. Edinger married Esther Tobias, born March 3, 1834, daughter of Abraham and Hannah (Hartman) Tobias, of Bern township, and two children were born to this union: Hannah, born Aug. 30, 1851, m. Harrison G. Lincoln; and Levi.

Levi Edinger has been a farmer from his youth, with the exception of one year, 1885, when he lived in Reading and worked for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. Since 1869 he has lived in the Poplar Neck district, was for twenty-five years the operator of the Edinger farm, working first for his father and later for himself, and in 1894 he located on the well-known General William High homestead, which he has sine cultivated. This fine tract of land, consisting of 200 acres, has been brought by Mr. Edinger into an excellent state of cultivation, has been furnished by him with the latest and most highly improved farm implements and stocked with a herd of cows all raised by himself, whose product he sells in Reading. During the season Mr. Edinger does considerable threshing. He owns two houses in Reading, No. 907 North Eighth street, and No. 1049 Buttonwood street, and is a stockholder in the Reading Bone Fertilizer Company. He is a Republican in politics and a Lutheran in religion, he and his family attending Spies's Church in Alsace township. Mr. Edinger is a self-made man in every sense of the word, having fought his own way up the ladder of success, until he now stands at the top, one of Cumru township's most substantial men.

In 1880, Mr. Edinger was married to Sarah A. Raudenbush, born June 25, 1861, daughter of Richard B. Raudenbush. Mr. and Mrs. Edinger have had eight children; Laura E., born Jan. 8, 1881, m. Daniel Clouser; Harry T., born July 11, 1882, m. Annie Wolf; Maud, born Feb. 24, 1886; Esther L., born Aug. 23, 1887; died June 11, 1896; Paul L., born Feb. 9, 1891; Richard L., born Aug. 29, 1893, died June 17, 1896; Levi L., born March 12, 1895, died Aug. 4, 1896; and Earl J., born March 20, 1899, died Aug. 5, 1899.


EDINGER, WILLIAM C.

p. 843

Surnames: EDDINGER, REPPERT, FISHER, FRY, MEST, DeLONG, MILLER, CLAUSER, MOSER, KUMMERER, HATFIELD, HERBST, WENTZEL, SHANER, BAHR, MOYER, MATTHIAS, JOHNSON, GABEL, HARTMAN

William C. Edinger owns two farms in Colebrookdale township, Berks county, where he lives and farms, his home being near the town of Gablesville His great-grandfather Frederick Eddinger, was a Pioneer of the county, having been a resident of District township in 1790. He was a blacksmith by occupation. In religion he was a Lutheran, and he is buried at the Longswamp Church. He and his wife, Catharine (Reppert), had a family of four children: Frederick, Jr., Peter, Jacob and Joseph.

Peter Edinger son of Frederick, was born Jan. 1, 1795, in the Blue Mountain region, and died May 26, 1868-69, at the Devil's Hole; he is buried in an unmarked grave at Bally Catholic Church, of which he was a member, though he was originally a Lutheran, changing his church connection when he married, as his wife was a Catholic. Peter Edinger was a resident of Washington township, was a blacksmith by calling, and followed that trade at the forges in Lower Berks county. He married Maria Reppert, his mother's cousin, and they had a family of eight children: John lived Washington township; Abraham lived at Allentown Pa.; Catharine married John Fisher and lives with her daughter, Mrs. William Fry, in Hereford township; Anna married a Mr. Mest; Elias is mentioned below; Frederick, born June 21, 1826, died June 21, 1879; Elizabeth, widow of Daniel Reppert, lives at Chester, Pa.; Magdalena, widow of George DeLong, makes her home with her son, Oswin DeLong, at Huff's church. Of this family Frederick Edinger, born June 21, 1826, was killed by a mine explosion at Emaus, Lehigh county on which occasion eleven men lost their lives, June 21, 1879, his fifty-third birthday. In earlier life he lived in Douglass, and Washington townships Berks county, and he and his family were members of the Catholic Church at Bally, where they are buried. He married Sophia Miller, born in 1827, died 1902, and they had children as follows: Henry Annie, Edwin, Amanda, Jerome, Mary, Frederick and Lizzie.

Elias Edinger, son of Peter, was born in Washington township, Berks' county, April 29,1822, and died Jan. 8,1892, on his farm one and a half miles west of Gablesville, aged seventy years, eight months, nine days. He is buried at Hill Church, of which he and his family were Lutheran members. Mr. Edinger was a blacksmith in Earl township, where he owned a thirty-acre tract, which he sold in time and bought the farm of sixty-five acres one and a half miles west of Gablesville, living there until his death. He married Mary Clauser, daughter of George and Catharine (Moser) Clauser and nine children were born to them: Hannah (m. William Kummerer) ; William C.; Mary Ann (m. Jacob Hatfield of Pottstown); Catharine, deceased (m. Horace Herbst) John (of Boyertown) ; Morris (of Barto, Pa.); Obediah (of Earl township); Ellen (m. Francis Wentzel, of Pottstown, Pa.) and Frank (lives in Earl township).

William C. Edinger was born in Berks county July 16,1848, and was reared to farming, continuing to work for his parents until he reached his majority. He followed carpentering for twelve years in Colebrookdale and Earl and surrounding districts, and in 1884 he began farming at Boyertown, on the Shaner homestead, which consisted of over one hundred acres, and upon which he remained eight years. In the spring of 1893 he moved to his present place, a ninety-six-acre farm in Colebrookdale township, to which he devotes most of his time, renting his other farm, which is the same size as his home place. The big stone house on his home place is a dwelling of Revolutionary times, built by Johannes Bahr, and though old is still in the best condition. The barn was built in 1801, and is in excellent shape, having been remodeled by the present owner in 1896. In addition to general farming Mr. Edinger engages in dairying, shipping his milk to a creamery. Mr. Edinger is interested in the welfare of his locality, and served three years as a member of the school board He is a Democrat in politics.

On Oct. 2. 1870, Mr. Eddinger married Maria Moyer, daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth (Matthias) Moyer, of Earl township, and granddaughter of Henry Moyer. Eight children have been born to this union, namely: Jacob, who rents his fathers farm before mentioned. m. Sallie Moyer, and they have a family of five children, Lena, Ralph, Mary, Beulah and Howard: Sallie m. Henry Johnson, and was a widow at the time she met death in the terrible theatre disaster at Boyertown (she had a daughter Gertie and a son Ernest who survive their mother and live with their grandparents; Mr., and Mrs. Wm. C. Edinger) Agnes m. Daniel Gabel. and both died in the disastrous Boyertown fire of Jan. 13, 1908; Lizzie m. Wayne Hartman, of Gablesville, and is the mother of four children, Russell, William, Hilda and Edith; Charles, who is unmarried, assists his father upon the farm ; William, also unmarried, helps with the work at home; Bertha is at home; Florence perished in the Boyertown fire previously mentioned.

Mr. Edinger and his family are members of St. John's Lutheran Church at Boyertown, and he has been one of the prominent workers in that congregation, having served as deacon and elder.


EGE, GEORGE

p. 332

Surnames: EGE, OBERFELDT, OLD, SHULZE, ERMENTROUT

George Ege, was born March 9, 1748, and died Dec. 14, 1829, aged eighty-one years, nine months. During his long and active business career he was extensively known as the largest landowner of his time in Berks county, and prominently identified with the iron interests of the county for a period of half a century. In 1774 he purchased an interest in Charming Forge for eight hundred and thirty-eight pounds. Nine months later he bought the remaining interest for one thousand six hundred and sixty-three pounds, and became its sole owner and manager. In 1804 he built and operated Schuylkill County Forge, near Port Clinton, then in Berks, now in Schuyl-kill county. At that time he was possessed of the following landed estates: Charming Forge, with four thousand acres; Reading Furnace, with six thousand acres; Schuylkill Forge, with six thousand acres; and four large farms in Tulpehocken and Heidelberg townships, embracing one thousand acres. The names of these farms were "Spring," "Sheaff," "Leiss" and "Richards." In 1824 the assessed value of his personal and real estate was three hundred and eighty thousand dollars. During the Revo-lutionary war he was an ardent patriot, and in 1783 was a member of the General Assembly of Pennsylvania. In 1791 he was appointed one of the first associate judges of Berks county under the Constitution of 1790, and served continuously with marked ability until 1818, a period of twenty-eight years, when he resigned the position to devote himself exclusively to his extensive business interests. He died at his home at Charming Forge, in Marion township, Berks county, and his remains were interred in the cemetery of Womelsdorf.

Judge Ege married Elizabeth Oberfeldt, of Amboy, N. J., by whom he had three children, George, Rebecca and Michael. There are no descendants of George now living; Rebecca married Joseph Old and died without issue,, Michael married Maria Margaretta Shulze, daughter. of Rev. Mr. Shulze, pastor of Tulpehocken church. One of the grandchildren of Michael and Margaretta Ege, Har-riet, married John Ermentrout, and lived at Reading to an advanced age.


EGE, JOHN

, p. 1636

Surnames: EGE, WONNBERGER, BOWER

John Ege, M. D., a practising physician at Reading since 1880, was born at Dettingen, in Wurtemberg, Germany, Feb. 13, 1854. After going to the local schools until he was fourteen years old, he studied the higher branches in advanced schools in that vicinity, and attended medical lectures for two years, when he emigrated to America in 1880. He landed at New York, and shortly afterward proceeded to Reading. After practising at Reading as a physician for a year, he attended medical lectures for two years in the Hahnemann College, at Philadelphia, and was graduated in 1883. He then directed his attention particularly to surgery and established a private hospital in connection with his office., Much of his time was given to the treatment of Consumption, and in 1887 he read a special paper on the subject before a medical convention at Washington, D.C.

In 1889 Dr. Ege visited the Paris Exposition, after which he traveled through Switzerland to Berlin, where to took a special course on bacteriology and other branches of medical practice. During the last six years he has given special attention to the application of radium in the treatment of diseases, more particularly of a cancerous nature, and he has been very successful, having cured a number of remarkable cases. He possesses several radium tubes. One of them has the extraordinary strength of 1,800,000 activity, only six similar tubes being in America.

In 1883, Dr. Ege married Paulina Wonnberger (daughter of Prof. Carl Wonnberger, teacher of music, of Reading), by whom he has had five children: Olga (died in infancy), Carl (pharmacist, m. Stella Bower); Rhea (graduate of Girls' High School and now a teacher in a public school at Reading); Otto (student of interior decoration, attending the School of Industrial Arts of the Pennsylvania Museum at Philadelphia); and Waldo (attending the Reading Boys' High School).


EGOLF, JOHN H.

p. 1236

Surnames: EGOLF, BUNN, CONARD, EAGLE, KUPP, LUPPOLD, MURPHY, POTT, REIFSNYDER, RHOADS, SATTER, YOUNG, BARGE, HINE, McCANTY

John H. Egolf, one of the old-time business men of Douglassville, Berks Co., Pa., where he conducts a flourishing wholesale and retail coal, grain and feed business, was born Sept. 8, 1843 at Pottstown, Pa., son of Hezekiah B. and Lavina (Pott) Egolf.

Jacob Egolf, the great-grandfather of John H., was a native of New Hanover, Montgomery Co., Pa. June 4, 1795, he purchased from Henry Keim a tract of land consisting of 79 acres 32 perches, in Rockland township, Berks county, which property is recorded in Patent Book A, vol. 7, p. 123, and in Berks county in Deed Book 14, p. 421. Here the ancestor spent the remainder of his days. In 1907, twelve persons of the name were residing in Reading and some of the descendants of Jacob Egolf now live at Hamburg and in Fleetwood.

Adam Egolf, the grandfather of John H., is buried in the old Pottstown cemetery, the date of his birth and death unknown. In 1837 he purchased a property in Amity township from Henry Mane, and at one time owned a tract of 150 acres, on which he carried on farming. He retired some years before his death. He was a tall, slender man, was a consistent member of the Lutheran Church, and was known throughout his community as an honest and upright citizen. Adam Egolf married Elizabeth Bunn, and to them the following children were born: Hezekiah; Jacob who died young; Caroline, m. Samuel Murphy and lived in Chester county; Julian, m. John Luppold and lived in Amity township; and Rebecca, m. Amos Reifsnyder and lived in Amity township. All of these children are deceased.

Hezekiah B. Egolf was born in Rockland, Berks Co., Pa., April 13, 1816, and died Nov. 12, 1887, aged 71 years, 6 months, 29 days. He was a miller by trade, and conducted a grist mill in Union township for a number of years, this being known as Sixpenny Mill, as it was situated on Sixpenny creek.

Here he also carried on farming to some extent. Later he located in Douglassville, where for ten years he was engaged in a coal and lumber business, and became a successful business man and useful citizen of his community. In politics a stanch Democrat, Mr. Egolf was elected by his fellow citizens to the positions of school director, auditor, tax collector and assessor, and filled all of these incumbencies ably and faithfully. He was a member of the Amityville Lutheran Church, and was a member of the building committee that erected the present edifice. He is buried at Amityville cemetery, where his wife was also laid to rest.

Hezekiah B. Egolf was married to Lavina Pott, born in 1821, who died in 1904, daughter of John and Ellen (Eagle) Pott. Mr. Pott came from Germany in infancy. He and his wife both met their death on the Reading railroad tracks 1-1/2 miles above Douglassville, Pa., when the carriage in which they were riding was struck by the Aerial Engine. To Mr. and Mrs. Egolf there were born these children: John H.; Abigail, born in 1845, who died in 1881; Emily F., deceased, m. Walt Young; Anna, who died unmarried in 1865, aged 17 years; Ellen, who also died young; Elizabeth, born in 1858, who died in 1862; Franklin P., born in 1853, who died in 1857; and Bertha K., m. Ammon K. Rhoads of Amityville, Pa.

John H. Egolf was brought to Exeter township, Berks county, by his parents, when one year old, and his education was secured in the public schools of Union township and the Philomathean Institute below Birdsboro, which was organized by Prof. B.F. Barge in 1861. This gentleman, who was a graduate of Yale College, had first conducted his school in a private house, but later founded the well known institute. At an early age young Egolf began working in his father's mill, remaining there until 22 years of age, and on coming with the family to Douglassville he assumed charge of the Reading Station, a position which he held for 11 years. In 1877 Mr. Egolf purchased the good will, stock and fixtures of Charles H. Hine, conducting that well known general store for 25 years, and in 1903 he engaged in his present business, employing three men and being eminently successful. His business ventures have not been confined to these enterprises, however, and he now serves as treasurer of the Douglassville Iron Company, of which he was one of the founders, and which employs as many as 80 men. For 15 years he was president and a director of the Phoenix Mutual Fire Insurance Company, with main offices at Phoenixville, and he was also one of the organizers of the American Casuality Company.

Mr. Egolf's home is a large stone residence, situated near his place of business, built by Henry McKanty about 1838. It is surrounded by a fine, large, well-kept lawn and shrubbery and flowers add greatly to the beauty of the place. He also owns a tract of 42 acres, which is being cultivated under his personal supervision. In political matters, like his father, he is a stanch Democrat, and has served as school director, assessor, delegate to a number of county conventions, and State delegate on two occasions, once when the Hon. Mr. Day of Philadelphia was nominated for the office of State treasurer, and again when Robert E. Pattison was nominated the second time for the governorship, to which he was subsequently elected. During President Cleveland's administrations, Mr. Egolf was postmaster at Douglassville. With his family he attends divine worship at the Lutheran Church of Amityville.

On March 8, 1878, Mr. Egolf was united in marriage with Lizzie J. Conard daughter of Adam and Elizabeth Conard, of Douglassville, and to them there have been born the following children: Nellie, m. to Frederick A. Satter, of Douglassville; Mabel, m. to Albert Kupp, a resident of Douglassville; and John Conard, and Frances E., who are attending school.


EHST, IRWIN T.

p. 374

Surnames: EHST, IHST, EAST, ISH, BECHTEL, BUTZ, EDDINGER, BAHR, FREED, LATSHAW, WEISE, SCHWERTLEY, MOYER, GABEL, FUNK, TEA, MAUL, ERB, OBERHOLTZER, BRUNNER, EMES.

Irwin T. Ehst, director of the National Bank of Boyertown, director and secretary of the Franklin Improvement Company, director and secretary of the Union Manufacturing Company, director of the Manatawny Mutual and Fire and Storm Insurance Company, secretary, treasurer and general manager of the Boyertown Gas Company, and interested in many other of the largest and most important industries of Berks county, was born in Oley township, this county, Nov. 19, 1860.

( 1 ) Nicholas Ehst (also spelled Ihst and East, and is the Pennsylvania archives among the list of emigrants Ish) was the ancestor of the American branch of the family. He was born in Switzerland in 1711, and he came to the New World on the ship "Pink Plaisance" which qualified at Philadelphia Sept. 21, 1732. He located in Colebrookdale township, Berks county, and became the owner of about 400 acres of land, near Gablesville, on the Popodickon creek. This tract has been divided into four farms, namely : the one on which the original buildings are located, now owned by Jacob B. Bechtel, and containing 103 acres ; the second owned by the widow of John Butz ; the third owned by William C. Eddinger ; and the fourth by John B. Bahr. On the part owned by Jacob B. Bechtel is a private burying ground where Nicholas Ehst and his wife, as well as later generations, are buried. The inscription on the tombstone of Nicholas Ehst, who died in 1804, reads : "Hier ruhen die Gebeine von Nicholas Ihst. war alt 93 Jahre": and on that of his wife : "Heir ruhen die Gebeine von Veronica Ihst. war alt 90 Jahre." The Ehst family are members of the Mennonite Church, and many of them are buried at Boyertown and Bally meeting houses. The children of Nicholas Ehst and his wife were: Daniel (whose children were -- John, Daniel, Abraham, Anna, and another daughter ), Abraham, Molly and Elizabeth.

(II) Abraham Ehst, son of the ancestor, became the father of four children : Samuel; Nicholas; John; and Anna (m. Henry Freed, and lived for some years near Norristown and then moved to Michigan, where both died., the parents of Catharine, Dinah, Anna, Mary, a daughter not named, Abraham, Henry, and John).

(III) Samuel Ehst, son of Abraham, met an accidental death in December, 1812, while in Philadelphia with a team. His three sons and six daughters were: Elizabeth, Polly, Dinah (born 1800), Abraham, Anna, Catharine, John L., a son (no name ), and Helena, the last named being a posthumous child.

(III) Nicholas Ehst, son of Abraham, married Elizabeth Latshaw, and settled in Chester county, Pa. They had three sons and five daughters, namely: Catharine, Dinah, Elizabeth, Mary, Abraham, Jacob, John, and Magdalena.

(III) John ( Johannes ) Ehst, son of Abraham, was born April 12, 1782, and owned the farm now the property of Jacob B. Bechtel. In 1806 he married Anna Margaret Weise (born July 28, 1786, died Dec. 10, 1810), and they had two children. He married (second) in 1812, Elizabeth Schwertley. To this second union were born three sons and five daughters: John, Polly, Abraham, Samuel, Elizabeth, Magdalena, Catharine and Anna. Of these Abraham and Samuel are both living (1908 ). Abraham was born March 28, 1817, on the original Ehst homestead, and he now lives at Barto, spending a part of his time with his son, Rev. John, who lives between Bally and Clayton. He is a most remarkable man, well preserved, bright, humorous, and possessed of a wonderful memory. He has never been obliged to wear glasses. At the age of twenty-one, he weighed 210 pounds, and now in his ninety-second year weighs 240. He married Susanna Moyer, born 1821, daughter of Michael Moyer. She died in 1869, the mother of Elizabeth, Rev. John, Henry, Abraham, Susanna, David and Jacob.

(IV) John L. Ehst, son of Samuel, was born Nov. 5, 1805, and at his death, Dec. 9, 1886, he was buried in Bally Mennonite Cemetery. He was a farmer in Colebrookdale township, but later he and his son Levi conducted a tannery near the Pike line in Oley township. He married Magdalena Gabel, born Feb. 22, 1806, died Jan. 1, 1899. They had four sons and one daughter: Leah, who married John H. Funk; Jacob, who conducted a hotel in Reading; William, living in Washington township; Henry G.; and Levi, of New Berlinville.

(V) Henry G. Ehst, son of John L., was born in Colebrookdale township, July 7, 1835, and he died on his farm in Washington township in 1890, and is buried at the Mennonite Meeting House at Bally, formerly called Churchville. He was a good quiet citizen, true to the teachings of his faith. He married Rachel Tea, daughter of James and Elizabeth ( Maul ) Tea, both natives of England. Their children were : Madora; Allen, a butcher at Bechtelsville; Warren, living near Bechtelsville; William, a school teacher in Washington township; Ammon, of Reading; Annie, m. to Allen Erb, of Bechtelsville; and Cora, m. to Elmer Oberholtzer, of Bechtelsville.

(VI) Irwin T. Ehst, son of Henry G., was born in Oley township Nov. 19, 1860, and was reared upon his father's farm, attending the public schools in the vicinity of his home, and later Prof. D. B. Brunner's Scientific Academy, Reading. In 1879 he was licensed to teach school, and he taught one term in Washington township. He then came to Boyertown and learned the printer's trade in the office of the Boyertown Messenger. For about four years the firm was Ehst & Emes, the partner being Calvin F. Emes, and they carried on a stationery and printing establishment, but Mr. Ehst, since April, 1889, has been alone. Mr. Ehst is a progressive and public- spirited man, and he has taken an active interest in many of the leading enterprises of his town and county. He is a director and stockholder in the National Bank of Boyertown, Burial Casket Company (employing 350 people), the Union Manufacturing Company (employing sixty people, and making all kinds of castings), and a director of the Franklin Improvement Co., builders. He is the principal owner of the Boyertown Gas Company, of which he is secretary, treasurer and general manager, and he is the business manager of Ehst & Co., largest real estate dealers in and about Boyerstown. He is director of the Manatawny Mutual Fire and Storm Insurance Company.

Mr. Ehst has been prominent in the public life of Boyerstown. In Politics he is a Republican, and for five years he was justice of the peace, and since 1896 he has been a notary public. He has been the adjudicator of a number of estates. At the time of the Opera House fire, Jan. 13, 1908, he was appointed by the Burgess as chairman of the Relief committee, with the privilege of choosing his own committee. This committee had charge of the identification and burial of the 171 dead, caring for orphans and relief, and the distributing of the $23,000 popular subscription.

Fraternally Mr. Ehst is a Mason, belonging to Stichter Lodge, No. 254, F. & A. M. , Pottstown; Bloomsburg Lodge of Perfection, 14th degree; Bloomsburg Consistory, 32d degree; Rajah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., Reading. He also belongs to Washington Camp, No. 104, P. O. S. of A., of Boyertown. He is unmarried.


EICHLER, HUGO

p. 1436

Surnames: EICHLER, LENHART, BARBEY, WERDORF

Hugo Eichler, brewmaster for the well-known brewing house of P. Barbey & Son, Reading, Pa. is a native of Dresden, Germany, born Sept. 29, 1853, son of August and Mary (Lenhart) Eichler, the former of whom, a prosperous tanner and currier of the old country, died there in 1894, aged sixty-six years. Of the nine children of August and Mary Eichler, three came to America, Hugo, Richard and Helen. The family are Lutherans.

Hugo Eichler received his education in Germany, and in 1869 was employed in a brewery in that country as an apprentice to the brewmaster, remaining there until he had mastered the art of brewing. In 181 he came to America, and from New York City, where he had landed, he proceeded at once to Cincinnati, O., accepting a position with one of the largest breweries of that section, remaining there six years. On his return to New York City he was employed as brewmaster by a large house there until 1900, in which year he came to this city, accepting his present position with the above named firm. Mr. Eichler is an expert in his line of business, and he has few superiors in the brewing of ales, lager and porter.

Mr. Eichler was married in Germany to Bertha Werdorf, and two children have been born to this union: Frieda and Elizabeth.

Mr. Eichler and his family are connected with the Lutheran Church. In political matters he is a Democrat. He is very popular in fraternal circles, and is connected with Teutonia Lodge, F. & A. M.


EILER, HOWARD IRVIN

p. 1669

Surnames: EILER, RITCHER, HOYT, STEPHENS, BRENEISER

Howard Irvin Eiler, architect, of Reading, is a descendant of one of the city's old and respected families. His great-great-grandfather was a member of the Hessian army sent here during the Revolution to fight the colonists, and like many of his comrades, remained in this country after learning the true cause of the struggle. Mr. Eiler's great-grandfather was born in Reading, and there spent his life, as has also Peter L. Eiler, his grandfather, who is now living there, retired from his extensive manufacturing interests, at the age of seventy-five years. Peter Eiler was born in Reading, where he has spent his entire life.

William H. Eiler, father of Howard I., died in Reading in 1899, aged forty-eight years. He was twice married, his first wife bearing him two children: Amelia, who died in infancy; and Howard I. To his second marriage four children were born: one who died in infancy; Emery, at home; Luther, in high school; and Horace, at school. Howard I. Eiler was born in Reading May 11, 1881. He received his education in the public schools of Reading, and left school to study architecture in the office of Mr. Abner A. Ritcher. He now has charge of Mr. Ritcher's office in the Colonial Building, Reading, the main office being in Lebanon. Here Mr. Eiler attends to all of the business, and superintends all of the building.

Mr. Eiler was married Jan 28, 1904, to Miss Ida Hoyt Stephens, daughter of Albert Stephens, and the belong to Grace Lutheran Church, he being financial secretary of the primary Sunday school. In politics he is a Republican.

Mrs. Eiler's grandmother on the maternal side, Emma Louisa Breneiser, is still living. Her father owned a saddlery and was a pioneer of Berks county. The Breneisers located in Berks county prior to the Revolutionary war, some of them taking up arms in that struggle.


EISENBISE, WILLIAM

, p. 1202

Surnames: EISENBISE, SCHMECK, SAYLOR, BECHTOLD, SCHAEFFER, KOCH, YOUNG

William Eisenbise, now living retired in Reading, at No. 341 1-2 South Seventh street, has throughout his long life known no other home than that city, in which he was born June 27, 1834.

Peter Eisenbise, father of William, was likewise born in Reading, and made it his lifelong residence. He combined the two vocations of hatter and brick manufacturer, following the latter calling during the summer months. He married Miss Susan Schmeck and several children were born to them, but only three are living, William, James K., and Ann Barbara (wife Of George Saylor, of Reading). Peter Eisenbise died a long time before his wife, at the age of fifty-three, a believer in the Lutheran faith. Mrs. Eisenbise died aged seventy-five. She belonged to the Reformed Church.

William Eisenbise was kept in school during his boyhood, and then was put to work carrying brick from a yard, an occupation in which he continued five seasons. Then began his connection with the Whittaker Rolling Mills, which plant was afterward purchased by Messrs. Seyfert & McManus. There Mr. Eisenbise worked for the greater part of his active career, there being but three brief periods when he was otherwise engaged. In 1862 he enlisted for nine months in Company B, 167th P. V. I., and was mustered out at the end of his term as first sergeant. He afterward served in the United States army. Another break occurred when he passed one year in the service of the Philadelphia & Reading Railway. But with these exceptions Mr. Eisenbise remained steadily with the one concern and was one of their trusted employes. He retired in 1891, and since then has given his attention to the erection of several houses, which have proved profitable investments.

On June 21, 1855, Mr. Eisenbise married Elvina, daughter of George Bechtold, and their wedded life has extended over more than half a century. Surrounded by their children they celebrated their Golden Wedding anniversary, at their home, No 341 1/2 South Seventh street. The house was decorated with plants and cut flowers, and red, white and blue streamers ran from the corners of the rooms. The event was made doubly interesting by the marriage of a grandson of the aged couple----Fred B. Schaeffer to Miss Amy Koch. After their wedding they proceeded to the house of the grandparents to help the latter celebrate their golden wedding. Many handsome gifts were exchanged, and a fine supper was served. Mr. and Mrs. Eisenbise were each seventy-one years of age. They were married by Rev. Joseph Young, a former United Brethren Pastor of Reading.

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Eisenbise were twelve in number: Ada, Peter, William, Alvina, Emma, Alice, George, Harry, Lillie M., Albert, Mary and John. Mr. Eisenbise is a member of the Reformed Church, and fraternally belongs to Lodge No. 62, F. & A. M., while his name is also found on the rolls of the Liberty Fire Company. Politics was always an engrossing interest with him, and he has done much work in support of his chosen party, the Democratic. He was twice a member of the city council from the Second ward, and after his removal from the Second to the Fifth ward, was a delegate from the latter. His life has been quiet and unostentatious, but nevertheless filled with faithful service and real usefulness, and he commands the respect of all who know him.


EISENBROWN, PENROSE F.

p. 340

Surnames: EISENBROWN, WOLF, BAUER, KUHL, HAUCK, KEIFFER, BEITEL, EGGERT, STEINBACH, FUHRMAN, GROSSHOLZ, SOUDERS, HOFFMAN, TROXEL, MYERS, KNAUS, SCHEFFER, FRITZINGER, SMITH, SNYDER, CHRISTIAN, KAUFFMAN, FIX, FAUST, BIEHL, REESER, WENTZEL, GEISE

Penrose F. Eisenbrown, who died suddenly at his home in Allentown, July 4, 1898, was one of the oldest business men of Berks county, and a man whose life had been so ordered as to merit the high esteem and affection of all who knew him. He was born near Allentown April 3, 1831, son of John Daniel and Charlotte Barbara ( Wolf ) Eisenbrown.

John Daniel Eisenbrown was born in Adelberg, Germany. He came to this country when sixteen years of age, landing at Philadelphia. He was an organist and also followed tombstone cutting, and taught in a parochial school. He moved to Allentown in the fifties and lived there until March, 1874, when he died suddenly of apoplexy, just as he was preparing to move to Greenbrier, Northumberland county. His remains rest in Union cemetery, Allentown. Mr. Eisenbrown was twice married. His first wife was Charlotte Barbara Wolf, daughter of John George and Maria ( Bauer ) Wolf. She died in 1833, the mother of eight children, and is buried in a graveyard at Egypt Church in Northampton county. The children born to John Daniel and Charlotte Barbara (Wolf ) Eisenbrown were: (1) Frances m. (first ) a Mr. Kuhl, a lithographer in Philadelphia, and had two children, George and Mary. She m. (second ) Peter Hauck, of Philadelphia, who owned a large confectionery establishment and considerable property in Allentown. There were no children born to this second marriage. (2) Edward Constantine m. the only daughter of a well-to-do farmer named Keiffer, near Milton, and they had one child who died just ten days before his father. The latter's death was the result of an accident. He had sold some cattle and was on his way home when he was caught by a train on a bridge and was killed. (3) Mary Ann m. , lived and died in Whitehall, Pa. (4) Charlotte, deceased, m. Joseph Beitel, who lives in Allentown. (5) Wilhelmina m. Charles H. Eggert, and lived in Bethlehem. She died and is buried in the Moravian cemetery there. Her husband died in 1907. Two children survive. (6) Matilda, Mrs. Steinbach, lived at Limestoneville, Montour county, where she is buried. Her husband was a shoemaker by trade. He enlisted in the Civil War. They were the parents of six children. (7) Penrose Frederick was born April 3, 1831. (8) William, born in 1833, was adopted at Egypt by a family named Troxel, who afterward moved to Carroll county, Md. He became a painter by trade. He m. Mary Fuhrman and they now live on her father's homestead, which they own. They have no children. John George Wolf, father of Mrs. John Daniel Eisenbrown, was born in January, 1774, and died June 27, 1842; his wife, Anna Maria Bauer, was born July 17, 1775, and died in 1843. Their family consisted of two sons -- Fred and George -- and four daughters -- Mrs. Christiana Grossholz, Mrs. Souders, Mrs. Hoffman, and Mrs. Eisenbrown. John George Wolf was a wood turner, making a specialty of spinning wheels.

John Daniel Eisenbrown, for his second wife, m. Mary Troxel. They were members of St. Paul's New School Lutheran Church, at Allentown, and both are buried in the cemetery there. Of the children of this marriage, Emma m. James Myers, a shoemaker, and they lived at the corner of Jordan and Liberty streets, opposite the thread mill in Allentown ; Pauline m. a Mr. Knaus, a cabinet- maker of Philadelphia ; Theresa died when eighteen years old ; Christine became Mrs. Scheffer, and died a year after her marriage ; Alfred was a drummer boy in the Union Army, and died in the service ; Otto m. Amanda Scheffer, and is deceased.

Penrose F. Eisenbrown was but a year and a half old when his mother died, and he was taken to the home of his grandfather Wolf. Mr. Wolf was a woodcarver by trade, and he early trained his grandson in that line, at the same time cultivating in him habits of industry and thrift. Mr. Eisenbrown was ambitious and determined to enter business for himself. He began at Minersville, with a small establishment and a few hands, and there he was very successful. Thence he went to Pottsville, where he met with equal success, but his health failed, and he sold out in 1870, to engage in farming. About three years later he came to Reading, and he entered the marble business, building up a trade and reputation second to none. Monuments public and private, the work of his establishment, have been distributed all over the state. His taste was excellent and his workmanship the best. About 1896 he gave up active workmanship in the firm, which of late years was known as P. F. Eisenbrown, Sons & Co. , and moved to Allentown, where his death occurred.

Mr. Eisenbrown was a great lover of literature, and his library was large and well chosen. He possessed no little poetical talent, and produced many German and English poems, some of which were published in the Allentown and other papers, while many remained unprinted, only to be found among his papers at his death. He was an earnest Christian. In 1848 he organized a Sunday-School at Lehigh Church and superintended it many years. This school was very successful, and only a very short time before his death Mr. Eisenbrown participated in the exercises celebrating its fiftieth anniversary. He was a kind and sympathetic man, and as an instance of this, while he was teaching in the Lehigh Church and still a young man, an epidemic broke out, and the people were being swept before it in great numbers. He saw the need of assistance, and at once entered upon the task of nursing and tending those afflicted, and remained steadfast at this until the scourge abated. For his fidelity and kindness he was ever after held in grateful remembrance by those people. When he was a little boy some five years of age, and living with his grandfather, an uncle Frederick Wolf, donated the land for the church and cemetery since known as Zion's Hill, Bucks Co., Pa. , and Mr. Eisenbrown had the great pleasure of lifting the first shovelful of earth at the excavating for the erection of the first church there. It was his delight all through life to labor for and assist any and all matters for the Church and Sunday-School.

On July 3, 1859, at Greenbrier, Northumberland county, by the Rev. Jared Fritzinger, Mr. Eisenbrown was married to Sarah S. Smith, born Oct. 25, 1839, only daughter of Jonathan and Sally ( Snyder ) Smith. The following children were born of this union : Harvey Jonathan, born Sept. 22, 1860, at Greenbrier, baptized Nov. 22, 1860, died July 22, 1861, aged ten months ; Alice Charlotte, born Aug. 26, 1862, at Minersville, m. , Edward Christian, who is connected with the marble business ; Harry Wolf, born in Minersville, Sept. 16, 1864, baptized Nov. 14, 1864, is deceased. ; Charles Smith, born in Pottsville, Oct. 19, 1866, baptized June 28, 1867, m. Alice Kauffman, and is the senior member of the firm ; Annie, born in Pottsville, Sept. 18, 1868, died Dec. 29, 1870 ; George Franklin, born in Pottsville, Oct. 31, 1870, baptized Feb. 27, 1871, m. Rosa Fix, and is a member of the firm ; Wilson Henry, born Aug. 24, 1872, baptized April 29, 1873, m. Annie Faust, daughter of J. B. Faust ( superintendent of the lettering department in the plant ) and is in the Biehl Carriage and Wagon Works ; Edward Penrose, born in Reading, April 15, 1875, baptized July 4, 1875, m. Sarah Reeser, and is superintendent of the Granite Department at the North Reading Granite Works ; Mary Henrietta, born May 8, 1877, in Reading, baptized Oct. 1, 1877, died Dec. 4, 1879 ; Samuel Frederic, born in Reading, Sept. 16, 1879, baptized Jan. 4, 1880, m. Rosa Wentzel, widow of Harry Eisenbrown, and is a salesman for the firm ; Martha Sarah, born in Reading, March 4, 1882, baptized July 2, 1882, m. Dr. Samuel B. Geise of Jersey Shore, Lycoming Co. , Pa. ; and John Daniel, born June 6, 1886, baptized Oct. 3, 1886, is unmarried and is engaged in the firm as bookkeeper.

Mrs. Eisenbrown resides at No. 522 Elm street, Reading. She owns the old homestead of 125 acres in Greenbrier-- a farm once the property of her grandfather. Her sons have continued the marble and granite business so substantially successful under the father's management, and they are meeting with that prosperity that attends well-directed effort and honorable dealings.


EISENHOWER FAMILY

p. 1489

Surnames listed: EISENHOWER, FICHTHORN, FINK, FRILL, MOHN, MOWREY, HENRY

James Eisenhower, a retired citizen and native of Reading, Pa., is a son of Nathan M. and Margaret (Mowrey Eisenhower, and a grandson of John and Margaret (Mohn) Eisenhower.

John Eisenhower was of German descent and was an early pump-maker of Reading, his place of buisness being on South Tenth street, Reading, where he died in 1839, aged about seventy-two years. In religious belief he was a Lutheran, and he and his wife were the parents of four children: Nathan; David; Angelina m. John Fink, and Polly m. Solomon Frill.

Nathan M. Eisenhower was born in the city of Reading in 1812, and received his education in the subscription schools of Reading, and when a young man apprenticed himself to the carpenter and joiner's trade, with a Mr. Henry, who was the builder of Trinity Lutheran Church. After completing his apprenticeship, he worked for some years as a journeyman, and then engaged in contracting and building, at one time being one of the leading men in his line of business in the city. A stanch Republican, he took quite an active part in political matters, and in 1864 was prevailed upon to run for the office of mayor, to which he was elected by a large majority, filling that office from 1865 to 1867. Many reforms were inaugurated during his administration, among them the organization of the first uniformed police squad in the city. Mr. Eisenhower's death occurred in 1877. He was a member of Lodge No. 62, F.& A.M., Chapter and K. T. Commandery No. 42. He was a captain in the State Militia, being in Colonel Knoderer's regiment, and was a member of the Reading Artillery in 1846, taking an active part in the military maneuvers until its disbandment. Mr. Eisenhower was a member of Montgomery Lodge of the I.O.O.F.

The children born to Captain Eisenhower and his wife were: William, born Dec. 17, 1834; George, who went to California after the Rebellion and died there; Charles, who died at the Soldiers' Home in Erie, was a member of Co. B, 128th P.V.I.; Daniel, who was a member of the 46th P.V.I.; James; Nathan M., a carpenter of Reading; and Emma m. Joseph Green. In religious belief Mr. and Mrs. Eisenhower were members of the Lutheran Church. She died in 1881, aged seventy-two years.

James Eisenhower received his education in the common schools of Reading, and as a boy apprenticed himself to Douglas & Connard, machinists, working with them until 1861, when he enlisted with the old Reading Heavy Artillery under Capt. George W. Alexander. Having served out his term of enlistment, he re-enlisted with Company B 128th P.V.I., Aug. 14, 1862, under Capt. William McNall and Colonel Crosedale, the latter of whom was killed at Antietam, being succeeded by Colonel Matthews. Mr. Eisenhower entered the service as second sergeant, and was then promoted to ambulance sergeant, serving as such during his term of enlistment. Receiving his discharge June 19, 1863, he re-enlisted in 1864 in the 3d Heavy Artillery, serving in Hampton Roads and at Fortress Monroe until his discharge in 1865.

After his discharge Mr. Eisenhower returned to Reading and completed his trade with Douglas & Connard, remaining with them for a period of two years and then went to Corry, Pa., engaging with the Atlantic & Great Western Railway Company as machinist. Returning to his former employers he continued with them until his retirement.

Mr. Eisenhower married Miss Mary Fichthorn, daughter of William Fichthorn, and five children were born to this union. We have record of James; Paul, who was drowned; and two children who died in infancy. Mr. Eisenhower is a member of Mt. Penn Lodge, No 65, K.P. In politics he is a Republican.


EISENHOWER FAMILY

p. 1489

Surnames listed: EISENHOWER, FICHTHORN, FINK, FRILL, MOHN, MOWREY, HENRY

James Eisenhower, a retired citizen and native of Reading, Pa., is a son of Nathan M. and Margaret (Mowrey Eisenhower, and a grandson of John and Margaret (Mohn) Eisenhower.

John Eisenhower was of German descent and was an early pump-maker of Reading, his place of buisness being on South Tenth street, Reading, where he died in 1839, aged about seventy-two years. In religious belief he was a Lutheran, and he and his wife were the parents of four children: Nathan; David; Angelina m. John Fink, and Polly m. Solomon Frill.

Nathan M. Eisenhower was born in the city of Reading in 1812, and received his education in the subscription schools of Reading, and when a young man apprenticed himself to the carpenter and joiner's trade, with a Mr. Henry, who was the builder of Trinity Lutheran Church. After completing his apprenticeship, he worked for some years as a journeyman, and then engaged in contracting and building, at one time being one of the leading men in his line of business in the city. A stanch Republican, he took quite an active part in political matters, and in 1864 was prevailed upon to run for the office of mayor, to which he was elected by a large majority, filling that office from 1865 to 1867. Many reforms were inaugurated during his administration, among them the organization of the first uniformed police squad in the city. Mr. Eisenhower's death occurred in 1877. He was a member of Lodge No. 62, F.& A.M., Chapter and K. T. Commandery No. 42. He was a captain in the State Militia, being in Colonel Knoderer's regiment, and was a member of the Reading Artillery in 1846, taking an active part in the military maneuvers until its disbandment. Mr. Eisenhower was a member of Montgomery Lodge of the I.O.O.F.

The children born to Captain Eisenhower and his wife were: William, born Dec. 17, 1834; George, who went to California after the Rebellion and died there; Charles, who died at the Soldiers' Home in Erie, was a member of Co. B, 128th P.V.I.; Daniel, who was a member of the 46th P.V.I.; James; Nathan M., a carpenter of Reading; and Emma m. Joseph Green. In religious belief Mr. and Mrs. Eisenhower were members of the Lutheran Church. She died in 1881, aged seventy-two years.

James Eisenhower received his education in the common schools of Reading, and as a boy apprenticed himself to Douglas & Connard, machinists, working with them until 1861, when he enlisted with the old Reading Heavy Artillery under Capt. George W. Alexander. Having served out his term of enlistment, he re-enlisted with Company B 128th P.V.I., Aug. 14, 1862, under Capt. William McNall and Colonel Crosedale, the latter of whom was killed at Antietam, being succeeded by Colonel Matthews. Mr. Eisenhower entered the service as second sergeant, and was then promoted to ambulance sergeant, serving as such during his term of enlistment. Receiving his discharge June 19, 1863, he re-enlisted in 1864 in the 3d Heavy Artillery, serving in Hampton Roads and at Fortress Monroe until his discharge in 1865.

After his discharge Mr. Eisenhower returned to Reading and completed his trade with Douglas & Connard, remaining with them for a period of two years and then went to Corry, Pa., engaging with the Atlantic & Great Western Railway Company as machinist. Returning to his former employers he continued with them until his retirement.

Mr. Eisenhower married Miss Mary Fichthorn, daughter of William Fichthorn, and five children were born to this union. We have record of James; Paul, who was drowned; and two children who died in infancy. Mr. Eisenhower is a member of Mt. Penn Lodge, No 65, K.P. In politics he is a Republican.

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