Peter Turney Ammond

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PETER TURNEY AMMOND, propietor of the tannery at Rural Valley, burgess and veteran of the Civil war, was born Oct. 14, 1847, in Kiskiminetas township, Armstrong Co., Pa., son of Henry M. And Susanna (Turney) Ammond.

Henry M. Ammond, father of Peter T. Ammond, was born in Westmoreland county, pa., and came to Armstrong county about 1840, establishing himself in business here as a shoemaker, following the trade more or less up to 1860. During the Civil war he enlisted in Company C, 103d Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, with which he served eighteen months, being taken a prisoner at the battle of Fair Oaks, Va., and sent to Libby and Andersonville prisons, where he was confined for some time. He was eventually exchanged at City Point, and was finally discharged on account of disability at Fairmont, Va., hospital. On the completion of his military service Mr. Ammond spent some time in Cowanshannock township, and in about 1883 or 1884 went to Michigan where he passed away at the age of seventy-seven years. He married Susannah Turney, daughter of Peter Turney, of German descent, who was a pioneer of Cowanshannock township, clearing up a farm in the vicinity of Yatesboro. His wife was Barbara Baird. The children born to Henry M. And Susannah (Turney) Ammond were six in number, as follows: Peter T.; John F.; Alexander; Jeremiah; Henry, and Rebecca, who married a Mr. Campbell.

Peter Turney Ammond, son of Herny M. Ammond, was reared in Armstrong county, and secured his education in the public schools of Rural Valley, which he attended until he was twelve years old. At that time he commenced serving an apprenticeship to the tanner's trade, but when only a lad of seventeen years, in the fall of 1864, enlisted in Company K, 104th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, with which he served eight months, taking part in the siege of Petersburg and numerous other engagements. On his return to the pursuits of peace Mr. Ammond resumed his trade, which he followed at different places until 1877, when he became a permanent resident of Rural Valley. At this time he is the propietor of the tannery in which he served his apprenticeship, and is considered one of his locality's substantial and enterprising citizens. In political matters a Republican, he is serving his second term as burgess, and under the newly constituted law will have served eight years when his term expires. He has proved as able an official as he has been a business man, and the conscientious manner in which he discharges the duties of his office has won him the confidence of his fellow citizens. Mr. Ammond is a popular comrade of the Grand Army of the Republic, and is a past commander of Anderson Fleming Post, No. 449. With his family he attends the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Mr. Ammond has been twice married, his first wife being Morrilla Armstrong, daughter of James Armstrong, of Armstrong township, Indiana county. By her he had two children: Laura, the wife of C. T. Schreckengost; and Mary, residing at home. Mr. Ammond's second marriage was to Letitia, third daughter of John and Margaret McLaughlin. Mrs. Ammond was first married to Thomas Templeton, who lived only about six months afterward, dying very suddenly.

Source: Pages 724-725 Armstrong County, Pa., Her People, Past and Present, J.H. Beers & Co., 1914
Transcribed October 1998 by Joyce Sherry for the Armstrong County Beers Project
Contributed for use by the Armstrong County Genealogy Project (http://www.pa-roots.com/armstrong/)

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